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Another Point of View, or Hamlet Revisited

The CBS Radio Workshop

Another Point of View, or Hamlet Revisited

Jun 22 1956



CAST:

NARRATOR

ANNOUNCER

CLAUDIUS, the king; kindly, gentle, and mature

HAMLET, the prince; sullen, sulky, and adolescent

GERTRUDE, the queen

POLONIUS, the court chamberlain; garrulous

OPHELIA, Polonius' daughter

LAERTES, Polonius' son

and the AUDIENCE at the play




NARRATOR: You've often heard that old saying, "Things are not always what they seem." Well, let us be brutally frank with you tonight and say that it is our happy duty to demolish completely that ridiculous little phrase with this objective reappraisal: "Things are always, and only, what they seem. It depends entirely on the point of view." It is upon this premise, then, that tonight we would like you to take a closer look at "Hamlet, Prince of Denmark."


MUSIC: INTRODUCTION ... THEN BEHIND ANNOUNCER, OUT AT [X]


ANNOUNCER: From Hollywood, CBS Radio presents THE CBS RADIO WORKSHOP, dedicated to man's imagination -- the theater of the mind. [X]


Tonight, transcribed for your amusement -- or fury, according to your temperament or philosophy -- "Another Point of View, or Hamlet Revisited," being an analytical misrepresentation of Shakespeare's greatest hero figure, compiled especially for the Workshop by Ben Wright and William Conrad. And now, once again, here is Mr. Conrad.


NARRATOR: Now, with regard to Hamlet, it seems a little more than strange to us -- and historical debate gives us grounds -- that if Hamlet were such a hero in Denmark, he would automatically have been elected king upon the death of his father, and yet he was not. We wonder why. 


Again, it seems highly probable that Claudius did not kill Hamlet's father purely from jealousy or desire to usurp the throne, but simply because he was a patriot with the highest moral motives who realized that the danger to Denmark made the removal of a useless king a national necessity. And again, historical debate gives us most valid grounds for this supposition. And finally it occurs to us that there was really nothing rotten in the state of Denmark, but Hamlet made it so.


You will, of course, demand proof, and proof you shall have. Firstly, however, we must confess that though we use only the words of the Bard of Avon in our drama, we've had to make deep and prolonged cuts for the sake of timing, for the play uncut, as of course you're all well aware, runs some four and a half hours.


Well, without further ado, ladies and gentlemen, we present, for your consideration, "Another Point of View, or Hamlet Revisited."


MUSIC: INTRODUCTION ... THEN BEHIND NARRATOR--


NARRATOR: Our scene: Denmark, Elsinore Castle. The new king Claudius has been enthroned and, having offered himself in marriage to his brother's widow Gertrude, has been accepted by her most gratefully, for she has well-realized that marriage to Claudius will mean not only happiness and security for herself, but will provide a strong and guiding hand for her moody and difficult son, young Hamlet. And here, in our first scene, Claudius is trying most sincerely to make friends with his stepson:


CLAUDIUS

Now, my cousin Hamlet, and my son--


HAMLET (FLIPPANT)

A little more than kin, and less than kind!


CLAUDIUS (TAKEN ABACK)

How-- How is it that the clouds still hang on you?


HAMLET

Not so, my lord; I am too much i' the sun.


NARRATOR: Now, Claudius -- rather taken aback by this unpleasant bit of double-talk, but determined to make a go of things -- looks pleadingly to his queen for a little help in the awkward conversation, and Gertrude, ever helpful, tries this piece of sensible advice on Hamlet:


GERTRUDE

Good Hamlet, cast thy nighted colour off,

And let thine eye look like a friend on Denmark.

Do not for ever with vailed lids

Seek for thy father in the dust:

Thou know'st 'tis common,--all that lives must die,

Passing through nature to eternity.


HAMLET

Ay, madam, it is common.


GERTRUDE

If it be,

Why seems it so particular with thee?


HAMLET

Seems, madam! Nay, it is.


NARRATOR: Well, obviously, the young man is annoyed at mama, too, but, uh, Claudius, dear soul that he is, is quite determined to be, in the true sense of the word, a "dad" to his stepson, and is now prepared to jackknife backwards to keep the peace, for let's not forget that this little altercation takes place in front of the entire court. So how is this for a beautiful piece of understanding and moderation?


CLAUDIUS

'Tis sweet and commendable in your nature, Hamlet,

To give these mourning duties to your father;

But 

We pray you, throw to earth

This unprevailing woe; and think of us

As of a father: for let the world take note

You are the most immediate to our throne;

And with no less nobility of love

Than that which dearest father bears his son

Do I impart toward you. 

And we beseech you, bend you to remain

Here in the cheer and comfort of our eye,

Our chiefest courtier, cousin, and our son.


GERTRUDE

Let not thy mother lose her prayers, Hamlet:

I pray thee stay with us.


HAMLET

I shall in all my best obey you, madam.


NARRATOR: And now surely you've got to admit that that's just about as petulant a stamp of the foot as you could look for in a month of ballet rehearsals -- and rather ugly behavior for a hero. Now, does Claudius swing one at Hamlet for this baldish effrontery? He does not. And why? Because he has obviously read all the books about bringing up children properly and knows very well the dangers of submitting them to the traumatic shocks of anger. No, to dear old Claudius, a dad is very simply a dad, and he's duty-bound to see the youngster through the difficult years. And let's not forget for one second that our young Hamlet is only thirty-one or thirty-two at the most. Now, note this for a superb example of turning the other cheek. Hamlet has just sulkingly mouthed:


HAMLET

I shall in all my best obey you, madam.


NARRATOR: To which Claudius says:


CLAUDIUS (CHEERFUL)

Why, 'tis a loving and a fair reply:

Be as ourself in Denmark.


NARRATOR: Now, quite honestly, have you ever heard anyone be so warm or charming? Yet this is Claudius speaking, the very man that we are asked -- nay, forced -- to call villain. 


Now, to expand our premise, let's listen to a fragment of Hamlet's outlook on life. Of course, he comes downstage center for this, as he is wont to do with all his little pleasantries.


MUSIC: PENSIVE ... IN AND BEHIND HAMLET--


HAMLET

O that this too too solid flesh would melt,

Thaw, and resolve itself into a dew!

Or that the Everlasting had not fix'd

His canon 'gainst self-slaughter! O God! God!

How weary, stale, flat, and unprofitable

Seem to me all the uses of this world!


NARRATOR: (EXHALES) Well, one could say that that's a fairly unhealthy attitude toward life. But let's try to be understanding. Let's try to be as understanding as Claudius. Now, perhaps Hamlet is, er, sick -- with love. After all, the court chamberlain has a most attractive daughter, Miss Polonius -- or Ophelia to her friends -- and Hamlet has certainly been playing a bit of footy-footy with her, much to the distress of her father, for even Polonius seems to have a pretty good idea of Hamlet's moral worth. Consider now his advice to her:


POLONIUS

For the Lord Hamlet,

Do not believe his vows; for they are brokers,--

Not of that dye which their investments show,

But mere implorators of unholy suits,

Breathing like sanctified and pious bawds,

The better to beguile. This is for all,--

I would not, in plain terms, from this time forth

Have you so slander any moment leisure

As to give words or talk with the Lord Hamlet.

Look to't, I charge you.


NARRATOR: Now, of course, Ophelia is not a particularly bright girl and not a very stable character, either -- in fact, pretty easily knocked off-balance, as we find out all too soon. 


But, ah, back to Hamlet for a moment. It might be well at this time to point out that our young hero suffers from hallucinations. You will remember, of course, that he's convinced that he's had a long chat with the ghost of his deceased father. Also that papa's spirit has begged him to avenge his death, et cetera, et cetera, et cetera. Now, of course, unfortunately, we cannot prove that Hamlet is a chronic alcoholic, but it is not beyond the realm of possibility that, on the night in question, he may have had-- (CHUCKLE) Well, let us say, one too many? 


However, for the moment, Hamlet does nothing about revenge, merely contenting himself with a visit to his lady fair to do a little courting. The effect on Ophelia is not surprising. She comes belting into her father, not only bewildered, but terrified. Listen:


SOUND: OVERLAPS WITH ABOVE ... OPHELIA'S HURRIED STEPS IN


OPHELIA (OVERLAPS WITH ABOVE, UPSET)

O, my lord! My lord!


POLONIUS

How now, Ophelia! what is the matter?


OPHELIA

O, alas, my lord, I have been so affrighted!


POLONIUS

With what, i' the name of God?


OPHELIA

My lord, as I was sewing in my chamber,

Lord Hamlet,--with his doublet all unbrac'd;

No hat upon his head; his stockings foul'd,

Ungart'red, and down-gyved to his ankle;

Pale as his shirt; his knees knocking each other;

--he comes before me.


POLONIUS

Mad for thy love?


OPHELIA

My lord, I do not know;

But truly I do fear it.


POLONIUS

What said he?


OPHELIA

He took me by the wrist, and held me hard;

Then goes he to the length of all his arm;

And with his other hand thus o'er his brow,

He falls to such perusal of my face

As he would draw it. Long stay'd he so.


NARRATOR: Uh, now a question, gentle listener: Has the boy next door ever behaved in that manner toward your daughter? I mean, when she was just sitting there on the front porch, tending to her knitting? (CHUCKLES) Well, that's pretty frightening behavior, don't you think? And it would take a good deal of understanding -- Ah, understanding -- a quality in which, more than anything else, our Claudius abounds. The very first thing he does when he realizes that  Hamlet not only is a problem, but has one, is to invite -- regardless of expense to the management -- two of Hamlet's old school friends to Elsinore for a long vacation, hoping that they may get Hamlet, er, out of himself with a few brisk games of ping pong or croquet or whatever. 


And how does Hamlet react to all this? The usual gambit: he is abominably rude to his friends, suspects them of treachery -- an incipient paranoiac if there ever was one! -- and finally, having dismissed them in a most cavalier fashion, cuts back sharply at what he feels about his stepfather, poor old Claudius. Well, this time we're only going to give you a snippet of the speech because-- Well, it's really rather frightening.


HAMLET (SAVAGELY)

Bloody, bawdy villain!

Remorseless, treacherous, lecherous, kindless villain!

O, vengeance!


NARRATOR: Very unstable, this young prince. And rather a cad, too, as you must agree when you hear our next scene. Do you recall what our hero says to little Ophelia, the girl whom he has professed to love?


HAMLET (COOL, FLIPPANT)

I did love you once.


OPHELIA

Oh, indeed, my lord, you made me believe so.


HAMLET

You should not have believ'd me; I loved you not.


OPHELIA

I was the more deceived.


HAMLET (CRUEL)

Get thee to a nunnery: why wouldst thou be a breeder of sinners? 


OPHELIA (ASIDE)

O, help him, you sweet heavens!


HAMLET

If thou dost marry, I'll give thee this plague for dowry,--be thou as chaste as ice, as pure as snow, thou shalt not escape calumny. Get thee to a nunnery. Or, if thou wilt needs marry, marry a fool; for wise men know well what monsters you make of them.


NARRATOR: Now, honestly, doesn't that rather shock you? Well, there's more yet. For instance, has it ever struck you how conceited Hamlet is? A veritable know-it-all. You remember in what terms he talks to the actors when they visit Elsinore for a one-night stand? No? Well, listen:


HAMLET (BOSSY, DISPARAGING)

Speak the speech, I pray you, as I pronounced it to you, trippingly on the tongue: but if you mouth it, as many of your players do, I had as lief the town crier spoke my lines. 


NARRATOR: Now, isn't that a gracious little speech? One might suppose that a professional theater company might know how to read their lines. Therefore, it seems that our hero figure is not only a cad, appallingly ill-mannered, but conceited beyond belief. And now we must add to these strange hero virtues his extraordinary propensity for intrigue. 


Yes, that's right -- intrigue. You must realize that since the day the crown was ripped unceremoniously from his grimy little fingers, Hamlet has gone his petulant way, making life just as difficult as possible for his Uncle Claudius. Ah, but he finally really gets down to business and comes up with as unpleasant a piece of underhanded nonsense as you could wish for. What? This:


HAMLET (CRAFTY)

I'll have these players

Play something like the murder of my father

Before mine uncle: I'll observe his looks;

I'll tent him to the quick: if he but blench,

I'll know my course.


NARRATOR: Item: gift, from Hamlet to stepfather Claudius and mummy -- two on the aisle for this gloomy little one-acter. (CHUCKLE) Charming, huh? But Claudius goes along with it, for he wants more than anything else to make Hamlet happy. And so the evening arrives and the stage is set, the audience assembles, and the play begins.


SOUND: AUDIENCE APPLAUDS ... THEN SETTLES DOWN AND LAUGHS A LITTLE BEHIND--


MUSIC: A GENTLE ELIZABETHAN AIR ... THEN IN BG


NARRATOR: The drama proceeds -- and, as it draws toward the end, a quiet uneasiness falls over the audience.  


SOUND: AUDIENCE WHISPERS UNEASILY BEHIND--


NARRATOR: And now the death scene. It takes place in a garden. The Player King lies down to take a nap. The onlookers have long since caught the parallel to their own king and they wait expectantly, breathlessly for the entrance of the serpent. Ah, but wait -- there will be no serpent. In a moment, an entrance will be made by the king's brother. He will creep quietly to the king's side and pour a vial of poison into the king's ear. (LOW) Ah, he's making his entrance now. Listen:


SOUND: THE AUDIENCE'S WHISPERS CHANGE TO GASPS AND EXCLAMATIONS OF SURPRISE AND HORROR BEHIND--


MUSIC: CHANGES TO AGITATO FOR THE MURDER ... THEN UP AND OUT FOR--


CLAUDIUS

Light! Give me some light! 


MUSIC: RESUMES MOLTO AGITATO FOR CLAUDIUS' HURRIED EXIT ... IN BG


CLAUDIUS

Lights, I say!


SOUND: AUDIENCE SHRIEKS AND REACTS WITH DISMAY AT CLAUDIUS' OUTBURST AND EXIT


MUSIC: SLOWS TO A STOP ... THEN OUT


NARRATOR: Ah, poor old boy. Hmph. You know, it's no wonder he's upset. Who wants to be continually reminded of past unpleasantnesses of that sort? After all, it was a necessity of state, wasn't it? (CHANGES SUBJECT) Ah, but Hamlet. Well, our hero is feeling just dandy, thank you. Here he is now, after he has so successfully cleared the hall:


HAMLET

'Tis now the very witching time of night,

When churchyards yawn, and hell itself breathes out

Contagion to this world: now could I drink hot blood,

And do such bitter business as the day

Would quake to look on. Soft! now to my mother.


NARRATOR: (CLEARS THROAT) Well, that's about as quaint a set of night thoughts as you could wish for. Yet it is in this same frame of mind that our young friend trots upstairs to kiss mummy goodnight. But en route he happens to pass the open door beyond which he sees his badly shaken stepfather at his prayers.


MUSIC: SOMBER, NOCTURNAL ... IN AND THEN IN BG--


NARRATOR: We are now permitted to hear another side of Hamlet's nature which, frankly, makes our hair curl -- and only heightens our compassion for poor old Claudius. (LOW) Softly now. Come in a bit closer. Ah, that's it. Now:


CLAUDIUS (OVERLAPS WITH ABOVE, IN QUIET PRAYER)

What then? what rests?

Try what repentance can: what can it not?

O wretched state! 

(CONTINUES INDECIPHERABLY BEHIND--)


HAMLET (LOW, TO HIMSELF)

Now might I do it pat, now he is praying;

And now I'll do't;--and so he goes to heaven;

No.

Up, sword, and know thou a more horrid hent:

When he is drunk asleep; or in his rage;

At gaming, swearing; or about some act

That has no relish of salvation in't;--

Then trip him, that his heels may kick at heaven;

And that his soul may be as damn'd and black

As hell, whereto it goes.


MUSIC: OUT


NARRATOR: (CLEARS THROAT) Now, we feel that that is pretty revealing. However, having delivered himself of these few kind words, our hero pops in to say goodnight to mama


Well, now, we're very sorry, but we simply cannot bring ourselves to tell you what he says to mummy in there, nor what he does in her bedroom, but you can take it from us that when he leaves, mama is due for quite a heavy dose of phenobarbital in order to catch forty winks that night. The following scene, however, will give you a pretty fair inkling as to what happened, as Gertrude rushes madly into her husband's chamber:


SOUND: GERTRUDE'S HURRIED STEPS IN


GERTRUDE (DISTRESSED)

Oh, my good lord, what have I seen to-night!


CLAUDIUS

What, Gertrude? How does Hamlet?


GERTRUDE

Mad as the sea and wind, when both contend

Which is the mightier: in his lawless fit

Behind the arras hearing something stir,

He whips his rapier out and cries 'A rat, a rat!'

And in this brainish apprehension, kills

The unseen good old man. (WEEPS)


CLAUDIUS

O heavy deed!

It had been so with us, had we been there:

His liberty is full of threats for all;

To you yourself, to us, to every one.

Alas, how shall this bloody deed be answer'd?


NARRATOR: Well, there you are. Um, do you have a penknife handy? Good. Notch one killing for Claudius, done for the common good; call him "villain." Now notch one murder for Hamlet, done solely because Polonius happens to have been eavesdropping in the queen's bedchamber. However, call Hamlet "hero." So far, so good: one apiece, even-steven. 


But meanwhile, back in the throne room, Claudius, realizing that things are getting a little out of hand with this fractious boy, has made a decision. He subtly leads up to it:


CLAUDIUS

Now, Hamlet, where is Polonius?


HAMLET

At supper.


CLAUDIUS

At supper! where?


HAMLET

Not where he eats, but where he is eaten: a certain convocation of politic worms are e'en at him. 


CLAUDIUS

What dost thou mean by this?

Where is Polonius?


HAMLET

In heaven: send thither to see: if your messenger find him not there, seek him i' the other place yourself. But, indeed, if you find him not within this month, you shall nose him as you go up the stairs into the lobby.


CLAUDIUS

Hamlet, this deed, for thine especial safety,--

Which we do tender, as we dearly grieve

For that which thou hast done,--must send thee hence

With fiery quickness: therefore prepare thyself;

The bark is ready, and the wind at help,

The associates tend, and everything is bent

For England.


HAMLET

For England?


CLAUDIUS

Ay, Hamlet.


HAMLET

Good.


NARRATOR: Did you expect a touch of remorse from our hero, perhaps? Oh, no -- not a bit of it. One word, that's all: "good." 


However, you haven't forgotten Ophelia, have you? Well, we should hope not. That's right, the rather dim but pretty young thing that Hamlet has cared for so gently. Ah, here she comes now. And, sad to say, as nutty as a fruitcake. Well, with reason, though. After all, her lover has just made a pincushion of her poor old father. Ah, there's nothing to be done about it, though.


MUSIC: SNEAKS IN DURING ABOVE ... A GENTLY LILTING SINGSONG WITH A DARK UNDERTONE ... FOR OPHELIA'S MADNESS ... IN BG


OPHELIA (DELIRIOUS)

There's rosemary, that's for remembrance; pray, love, remember: and there's pansies, that's for thoughts. And there's fennel for you, and columbines:--there's rue for you; and here's some for me:--we may call it herb grace o' Sundays:--

(SINGS)

And will he not come again?

And will he not come again?

No, no, he is dead,

He never will come again. (FADES OUT)


MUSIC: FADES OUT WITH OPHELIA


NARRATOR: And there she goes, out of doors, down to the nearest stream, and then -- plunk -- right into the middle of it, to do a little boating on her back, with flowers for company. Fatal, of course; she drowns. However! Box score for murder: Claudius, villain, one; Hamlet, hero, two. Unless you want to quibble about Ophelia's death being accidental. We don't. We say "murder"; notch two for Hamlet.


But at least Claudius has finally gotten Hamlet out of the country -- with his two chums, Rosencrantz and Guildenstern -- and that certainly must have been a relief. But it didn't last long, though. No, back bounces happy Hamlet, having in the meantime contrived the death of both of his dear old school chums. And why? Oh, some delusion that they were going to have him killed in England. And in fact he mentions as evidence a letter that he is supposed to have seen expressly ordering this, written by kindly old Claudius. Now, what can one think? After all, when a young man believes in ghosts and is quite convinced that he's had a long chat with one -- a ghost, mark you! -- we feel that a pinch of salt is indicated.


Now then, with our hero back home again and in fine fettle, here is the murder score for the second half: Claudius, one; Hamlet, four. And do you know what he does the first crack out of the box on his homecoming? He makes a circus out of his fiancée's funeral -- and right in front of her brother Laertes, too, and the whole court. Well, here's Laertes now, quite understandably mourning his loss:


SOUND: SNEAKS IN DURING ABOVE ... A BLEAK WIND BLOWS ... IN BG


LAERTES

O, treble woe

Fall ten times treble on that cursed head

Whose wicked deed thy most ingenious sense

Depriv'd thee of!--Hold off the earth awhile,

Till I have caught her once more in mine arms.


NARRATOR: And then Hamlet, a little jealous of Laertes being downstage center and feeling that he should get in on the act, pops up with this:


HAMLET

What is he whose grief

Bears such an emphasis? this is I,

Hamlet the Dane!


LAERTES (FURIOUS)

The devil take thy soul!


SOUND: HAMLET AND LAERTES GRAPPLE IN OPHELIA'S GRAVE ... STRUGGLE, GRUNTS, GROANS, ET CETERA ... IN BG


CLAUDIUS (AN ORDER)

Pluck them asunder!


GERTRUDE (DESPAIRING)

Hamlet?! Hamlet!


SOUND: AFTER A MOMENT, THE FIGHT ENDS


HAMLET

Why, I will fight with him upon this theme

Until my eyelids will no longer wag!


GERTRUDE

O my son, what theme?


HAMLET

I lov'd Ophelia; forty thousand brothers

Could not, with all their quantity of love,

Make up my sum.--What wilt thou do for her?


CLAUDIUS

O, he's mad, Laertes.


HAMLET

Woul't weep? woul't fight? woul't fast? woul't tear thyself?

Dost thou come here to whine?

To outface me with leaping in her grave?

Be buried quick with her, and so will I:

I'll rant as well as thou!


SOUND: WIND OUT


NARRATOR: And he does, too. Well, ladies and gentlemen, we are now rapidly approaching the end of our play and it's well worth bearing in mind that it is not until the end of the play approaches that our friend Claudius causes us a slight twinge of uneasiness. Oh, yes, you're quite right: the duel scene and the poison swords. 


Now, let me ask you another question. At what point would your patience have run out? Put yourself in that place and in that time. Now, here is Claudius, the head of a state, threatened with invasion by the power-hungry young Fortinbras of Norway -- and Claudius is trying desperately to put that state in order. And he might well have had a good chance had it not been for his stepson Hamlet. He has done everything in his power to keep Hamlet on an even keel. He has, in fact, been kindness itself -- while Hamlet, with great precision is knocking off, one by one, his entire court, and finally has the bead drawn on Laertes. 


Now, we feel that Laertes cannot be blamed for hating the man who was directly responsible for the death of his dear sister, who also skewered his papa without so much as an "I beg your pardon." And, in all fairness, we cannot blame Claudius for helping Laertes to his revenge.


Now, unfortunately being a little pressed for time, we have had to condense the last scene, the dueling scene. However, we feel that you are all familiar with the gory details. So we will just make the pertinent points. And they are - as follows:


GERTRUDE

(GURGLE, GASP, BLOODCURDLING DEATH SCREAM)


NARRATOR: Yes, there goes Gertrude. Poison, you know.


LAERTES

(GASPS, EXHALES HIS DYING BREATH)


NARRATOR: And that, of course, will be the end of Laertes. Yes, poison on the end of the sword.


CLAUDIUS

(GASP, DEATH GROAN)


NARRATOR: And that was poor old Claudius. And here comes--


HAMLET

(BIG GROAN)


NARRATOR: Yes, that's right -- Hamlet. Now, let us move in, ladies and gentlemen, and hear Hamlet's last speech, his dying speech. For here, we make a point -- and a big one as you shall discover -- for, with his last breath, our hero proves himself, beyond a doubt, a traitor to Denmark:


HAMLET

O, I die, Horatio;

The potent poison quite o'er-crows my spirit:

I cannot live to hear the news from England;

But I do prophesy the election lights

On Fortinbras: he has my dying voice.


NARRATOR: You have just heard Hamlet, Prince of Denmark, cast his vote for Fortinbras of Norway, relentless and savage enemy of Hamlet's own country. And that is our last point, ladies and gentlemen. 


To recapitulate then. Qualities for our hero Hamlet: he is vain, bad-mannered, suffers from paranoiac delusions; is an intriguer, a cad, and a traitor. But for our villain Claudius: he is patient, kindly, and understanding; abounds with moral courage, love, and selfless patriotism. Final score in the Scandinavian murder stakes: villain Claudius, one; hero Hamlet -- by means both direct and indirect -- seven.


There you are, ladies and gentlemen. That is our case. And we rest it.


Oh, uh, one final note. Did you realize that the Danish name Ambleth -- or Hamlet, in its Anglicized form -- means: "The Bungler"?


(AMUSED) Good night.


MUSIC: CURTAIN


ANNOUNCER: CBS Radio has presented THE CBS RADIO WORKSHOP. Tonight, "Another Point of View, or Hamlet Revisited." This scandalous misrepresentation was transcribed and produced by Antony Ellis and written by Ben Wright and William Conrad. The felony was compounded by Mr. Conrad's direction. Those aiding and abetting with portrayals were Ben Wright, John McIntire, Jeanette Nolan, Sammie Hill, and Fred MacKaye. Music was composed and conducted by Jerry Goldsmith. This is Hugh Douglas.


MUSIC: A GENTLE ELIZABETHAN AIR ... THEN IN BG, UNTIL END


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