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A Farewell to Arms

Studio One

A Farewell to Arms 

Feb 17 1948



CAST:

ANNOUNCER

HOST, Fletcher Markle


FREDERIC HENRY, American

CATHERINE BARKLEY, English

RINALDI, Italian surgeon

FERGUSON, English nurse

MANERA, Italian driver

MAJOR, educated Italian (1 line)

PASSINI, Italian

GORDINI, Italian

GAVUZZI, Italian

PORTER'S WIFE, Italian

PORTER, Italian

EMILIO, Italian barman

LIEUTENANT, Swiss

DOCTOR, Swiss

NURSE, Swiss



ANNOUNCER: Tonight, Miss Madeleine Carroll stars in Ernest Hemingway's "A Farewell to Arms" from Studio One at CBS.


MUSIC: FANFARE ... THEN IN BG--


CATHERINE: No one ever knows anything or is sure of anything in a war. Men go to the front and some of them come back and some of them don't. It's a dreadful thing; a terrible way for women to have to live, but there's absolutely nothing you can do about it.


MUSIC: UP, FOR AN INTRODUCTION ... THEN OUT BEHIND--


ANNOUNCER: We invite you to Studio One, radio's celebrated playhouse of dramatic entertainment, featuring the world's greatest stories in special hour-length versions for listening. And now, to introduce tonight's great story, here is the director of Studio One, Fletcher Markle.


HOST: Tonight, ladies and gentlemen, we bring you one of the most incomparable emotional experiences in American storytelling. Mr. Ernest Hemingway's "A Farewell to Arms" is, first of all, a magnificent romance told with shining simplicity and understanding. But it is also an unforgettable commentary on men and women at war. And tonight we're not only pleased and fortunate to have a great story for you, we're also very excited about having with us in Studio One a great actress and a great person, Miss Madeleine Carroll. The role Miss Carroll is performing tonight is more than a little familiar to her for just as the Catherine Barkley of "A Farewell to Arms" was a hospital worker in the battle areas of Italy in World War I, so was Miss Carroll a hospital worker in that same country in World War II, in recognition of which service she was awarded last week the U. S. Army Medal of Freedom. As for our other principals tonight, you'll be hearing Everett Sloane as Rinaldi, with Hester Sondergaard as Ferguson, and I'm going to remain at the microphone with them to tell the story of Lieutenant Frederic Henry, an American serving in the ambulance corps of the Italian army in Nineteen Hundred and Sixteen.


MUSIC: AN INTRODUCTION ... THEN BEHIND FREDERIC, OUT AT [X]


FREDERIC: (NARRATES) In the late summer of that year we lived in a house in a village that looked across the river and the plain to the mountains. The Austrians were there in the north and all day and all night Italian troops and big guns pulled by motor tractors went by the house and down the road. There were many victories that year. But one day the snow came very fast and then suddenly it was winter and we knew it was all over for that year. None of the mountains beyond the river had been taken. That was all left for the offensive next year. I went on a long leave and when I came back to the front we still lived in that town. There were many more guns in the country around and the spring had come. The room I shared with Lieutenant Rinaldi, a surgeon in the Italian medical corps, looked out on a courtyard. The window was open and there was a breeze from the sea. [X] Rinaldi had been asleep when I came in, but he awoke when he heard me in the room and got up and put his arms around my neck and kissed me.


RINALDI: (LAUGHS HEARTILY) Baby! You look fine! What kind of a time did you have?


FREDERIC: Magnificent.


RINALDI: Where did you go and what did you do? Tell me everything at once.


FREDERIC: Oh, I went everywhere. Milan, Florence, Rome, Naples, Messina--


RINALDI: Did you have any beautiful adventures?


FREDERIC: Yes.


RINALDI: Where?


FREDERIC: Milan, Florence, Rome, Naples--


RINALDI: (LAUGHS) That's enough. Tell me really what was best.


FREDERIC: In Milan.


RINALDI: Ah, that's because it was first. (LAUGHS) But here now we have beautiful girls. English girls; never been to the front before.


FREDERIC: Ah, good.


RINALDI: Ah, you don't believe me? We will go now this afternoon and see. English girls. I am now in love with Miss Barkley. I will take you to call. I will probably marry Miss Barkley.


FREDERIC: I have to get washed up and report. Doesn't anybody work now?


RINALDI: Next week the war starts again. They say so. The winter is over. You will come with me to see Miss Barkley?


FREDERIC: No.


RINALDI: Oh, yes, baby! You will please come and make a good impression on her.


FREDERIC: All right. Wait till I get cleaned up.


RINALDI: Wash up and come as you are. Wait. We should have a drink.


SOUND: CORK POPS ... DRINKS POURED DURING FOLLOWING--


FREDERIC: Not Strega. 


RINALDI: No. Grappa!


FREDERIC: All right.


RINALDI: There. For you. For me.


SOUND: THEY DRINK 


FREDERIC: (EXHALES)


RINALDI: Another, eh? And then I will take you to see Miss Barkley.


FREDERIC: All right.


RINALDI: All right!


SOUND: DRINKS POURED DURING FOLLOWING--


RINALDI: (AN AFTERTHOUGHT) Oh, ah-- Have you got any money, baby?


FREDERIC: Yes.


RINALDI: Good! Loan me fifty lire.


MUSIC: TRANSITION ... THEN BEHIND FREDERIC--


FREDERIC: (NARRATES) The British hospital was a big villa built by the Germans before the war. Miss Barkley was in the garden with another nurse; her name was Ferguson. We walked through the trees. Miss Barkley somehow walking with me and Rinaldi ahead with the other nurse. Miss Barkley was blonde and had a tawny skin and gray eyes. She carried a thin rattan stick, bound in leather like a riding-crop. I thought she was very beautiful. 


SOUND: THEIR FOOTSTEPS ON DIRT ... IN BG


CATHERINE: You're not an Italian, are you?


FREDERIC: Oh, no. I'm an American.


CATHERINE: What an odd thing -- to be in the Italian army.


FREDERIC: It's not really the army. It's only the ambulance. It's just that I was in Italy when it started and I speak Italian.


CATHERINE: It's very odd though. Why did you do it?


FREDERIC: I don't know. There isn't always an explanation for everything.


CATHERINE: Oh, isn't there? I was brought up to think there was.


FREDERIC: (BEAT) What's that stick you're carrying?


CATHERINE: (QUIETLY) It belonged to a boy who was killed last year.


SOUND: THEY STOP WALKING 


FREDERIC: I'm awfully sorry.


CATHERINE: He was a very nice boy. He was going to marry me and he was killed in the Somme. (BEAT) There's not really any sort of war down here, is there?


FREDERIC: Not yet.


CATHERINE: His mother sent me this little stick. They returned it with his things.


FREDERIC: Had you been engaged long?


CATHERINE: Eight years. We grew up together.


FREDERIC: Why didn't you marry?


CATHERINE: I don't know. I was a fool not to. I could have given him that anyway. But I thought it would be bad for him going away.


FREDERIC: I see.


SOUND: THEY RESUME WALKING


CATHERINE: Have you ever loved any one?


FREDERIC: No. Let's sit down on the bench here.


CATHERINE: All right.


SOUND: THEY STOP WALKING AND SIT


MUSIC: FROM OFF, A CONCERTINA PLAYS QUIETLY IN BG


FREDERIC: (EXHALES) You have beautiful hair. 


CATHERINE: Do you like it?


FREDERIC: Very much.


CATHERINE: I was going to cut it all off when he died.


FREDERIC: (BAD IDEA) Oh, no.


CATHERINE: I wanted to do something for him. He could have had anything he wanted if I would have known. I would have married him or anything. I know all about it now. But then he wanted to go to war and I didn't know. I thought it would be worse for him. I thought perhaps he couldn't stand it and-- And then of course he was killed and - and that was the end of it.


FREDERIC: Oh, I don't know.


CATHERINE: Oh, yes. That's the end of it.


BIZ: VOICES OF RINALDI AND FERGUSON LAUGHING IN THE DISTANCE


CATHERINE: Your friend is a doctor, isn't he?


FREDERIC: Yes. He's very good.


CATHERINE: That's splendid. You rarely find any one any good this close to the front. This is close to the front, isn't it?


FREDERIC: Quite close.


CATHERINE: Are they going to have an offensive?


FREDERIC: Yes.


CATHERINE: Then we'll have to work. There's no work now.


FREDERIC: Have you done nursing long?


CATHERINE: Since the end of 'fifteen. I started when he did. I remember having a silly idea he might come to the hospital where I was. With a sabre cut, I suppose, and a bandage around his head. Something picturesque.


FREDERIC: Ha! This is the picturesque front.


CATHERINE: Do you suppose it'll always go on?


FREDERIC: No.


CATHERINE: What's to stop it?


FREDERIC: It'll crack somewhere.


CATHERINE: (EXHALES) Do we have to go on and talk this way?


FREDERIC: No.


CATHERINE: That's a relief, isn't it?


MUSIC: TRANSITION ... THEN IN BG--


FREDERIC: (NARRATES) After a while we said good-night and left. Walking home, Rinaldi said--


RINALDI: Miss Barkley prefers you to me. That is very clear. But the other one is very nice.


FREDERIC: Very. You like her?


RINALDI: (UNHAPPILY) No.


MUSIC: HUMOROUS ACCENT ... THEN BEHIND FREDERIC--


FREDERIC: (NARRATES) The next evening I went to call on Miss Barkley again at the British hospital. She was sitting on a bench in the garden. Miss Ferguson was with her. They seemed glad to see me, but in a little while Miss Ferguson got up to go.


FERGUSON: I'll leave you two. You'll get along very well without me.


CATHERINE: Don't go, Helen.


FERGUSON: Oh, well, I'd really rather. I must write some letters.


FREDERIC: Good-night, then.


FERGUSON: Good-night, Mr. Henry.


FREDERIC: (LIGHTLY) Don't write anything that'll bother the censor.


FERGUSON: Oh, don't worry. I only write about what a beautiful place we live in and how brave the Italians are.


FREDERIC: That way you'll be decorated.


FERGUSON: (MOVING OFF) Oh, that'll be nice. Good-night, Catherine.


CATHERINE: I'll see you in a little while, Fergy.


FREDERIC: I don't think Ferguson likes me very much.


CATHERINE: Oh, nonsense, she's really very nice. She's a nurse.


FREDERIC: Aren't you a nurse?


CATHERINE: Oh, no. I'm something called a V. A. D. We work very hard but no one trusts us.


FREDERIC: Why not?


CATHERINE: Oh, I suppose because we're volunteers. The Italians didn't want women so near the front. So we're all on very special behavior. We're not allowed out.


FREDERIC: I can come here though.


CATHERINE: Oh, yes. We're not cloistered.


FREDERIC: Let's drop the war.


CATHERINE: It's very hard. There's no place to drop it.


FREDERIC: (MOVING IN FOR A KISS, BREATHY) Let's drop it anyway.


CATHERINE: No, please don't! Your arm--


FREDERIC: Why not? I want to kiss you.


CATHERINE: No.


FREDERIC: Yes. Please.


SOUND: SLAP IN THE FACE


FREDERIC: (EXHALES BEHIND--)


CATHERINE: Oh, I'm sorry. I didn't mean to slap you.


FREDERIC: (CHASTENED) You were quite right.


CATHERINE: I'm dreadfully sorry. I - I just couldn't stand the nurse's-evening-off aspect of it. I did hurt you, didn't I?


FREDERIC: You did exactly right. I don't mind at all.


CATHERINE: Poor man.


FREDERIC: You see, I've been leading a sort of a funny life here. And you're so very beautiful.


CATHERINE: You don't need to say a lot of nonsense. I said I was sorry. We do get along.


FREDERIC: Yes. (LIGHTLY) And we have gotten away from the war.


CATHERINE: (CHUCKLES WARMLY) You are sweet. 


FREDERIC: No, I'm not.


CATHERINE: Yes. You're a dear. (BEAT) I'd be glad to kiss you if you don't mind.


MUSIC: IN BG--


FREDERIC: (NARRATES) I looked in her eyes and put my arms around her as I had before and kissed her. I kissed her hard and as I held her suddenly she shivered. 


CATHERINE: (GASPS)


FREDERIC: (NARRATES) I held her close against me and could feel her heart beating and her head went back against my hand and then she was crying.


MUSIC: OUT


CATHERINE: (INHALES SHARPLY) Oh, darling. You will be good to me, won't you?


FREDERIC: Isn't there anywhere we can go?


CATHERINE: No, we - we have to just stay here. You did say you love me, didn't you?


FREDERIC: Yes. 


CATHERINE: Say it.


FREDERIC: I love you.


CATHERINE: And you'll call me Catherine?


FREDERIC: Catherine.


CATHERINE: (EXHALES) This is a rotten game we play, isn't it?


FREDERIC: What game?


CATHERINE: You're a nice boy, and you play it as well as you know how. But it's a rotten game. 


FREDERIC: Do you always know what people think?


CATHERINE: Not always. But I do with you. You don't have to pretend you love me. That's over for the evening. Is there something else you'd like to talk about?


FREDERIC: But I do love you.


CATHERINE: Please let's not lie when we don't have to. 


FREDERIC: Catherine--


CATHERINE: It sounds very funny now -- Catherine. Not the way he said it. You don't pronounce it very much alike. But you're very good. And you will come and see me?


FREDERIC: Of course.


CATHERINE: And you don't have to say you love me. That's all over for a while. Good-night. 


FREDERIC: I want to kiss you. 


CATHERINE: Do you want to -- very much?


FREDERIC: Yes.


CATHERINE: All right.


MUSIC: FILLS A PAUSE ... THEN BEHIND FREDERIC--


FREDERIC: (NARRATES) We walked to the door and I saw her go in and down the hall. I liked to watch her move. I went on home. It was a hot night and there was a good deal going on up in the mountains. I watched the guns flashing on San Gabriele and then I went up to my room.


RINALDI: So you make progress with Miss Barkley, eh, baby?


FREDERIC: Oh, we're friends.


RINALDI: Heh! You have that smug air of a cat with a mouthful of canary.


FREDERIC: And you have the air of an ignorant, uninformed Italian oaf. Good-night.


RINALDI: (LAUGHS HEARTILY) Good-night, little kitten!


MUSIC: HUMOROUS ACCENT ... THEN BEHIND FREDERIC--


FREDERIC: (NARRATES) The next afternoon we heard there was to be an attack up the river that night and that we were to take four ambulances there. I was riding in the first car and as we passed the entry to the British hospital I told my driver to stop. I hurried up the driveway and, inside the reception hall, I asked for Miss Barkley. She was on duty and they sent an orderly to find her and she came back with him and we stepped outside. 


CATHERINE: I wasn't expecting you until to-night.


FREDERIC: I'm leaving now for a show up above Plava.


CATHERINE: An attack? 


FREDERIC: It's all right. I don't think it's anything.


CATHERINE: And you'll be back?


FREDERIC: To-morrow.


CATHERINE: Here. Please take this. It's a Saint Anthony. They say a Saint Anthony's very useful.


FREDERIC: I'll take care of him for you. 


CATHERINE: And come to-morrow night?


FREDERIC: Yes. (BEAT) Good-by.


CATHERINE: No, not good-by.


FREDERIC: All right.


CATHERINE: Be a good boy and be careful. 


FREDERIC: (MOVING IN FOR A KISS, LOW) Catherine--


CATHERINE: (LOW) No. No, you can't kiss me here. You can't.


FREDERIC: All right.


CATHERINE: To-morrow night?


MUSIC: TRANSITION ... THEN IN BG--


SOUND: AMBULANCES DRIVE ON ROUGH ROAD ... IN BG


FREDERIC: (NARRATES) We drove very fast and soon we saw the dust of the other three cars ahead of us and Manera, my driver, settled back and began to talk.


MANERA: Tenente, there is nothing as bad as war. We in the auto-ambulance cannot even realize how bad it is. 


FREDERIC: (NARRATES) We went along the rough new military road that followed the crest of a ridge and I looked to the north at the two ranges of mountains, green and dark to the snow-line and then white and lovely in the sun. Those were all the Austrian mountains and we had nothing like them.


MANERA: When people realize how bad war is they cannot do anything to stop it because they go crazy. 


FREDERIC: (NARRATES) There were many troops on the road and motor trucks and mules with mountain guns and as we went down, keeping to the side, I could see the river far down below. And under a hill beyond the river, the broken houses of the little town that was to be taken.


MANERA: Some people never realize how bad war is. 


FREDERIC: (NARRATES) The sun was going down when we reached our rendezvous points. The road there was below the level of the river bank and all along the side there were holes dug in the bank with infantry in them. We parked the cars and I reported to the major.


SOUND: DURING ABOVE, AMBULANCES OUT


MAJOR: If this thing goes well, Lieutenant, I will see that you are decorated.


MUSIC: GENTLY OUT


FREDERIC: (NARRATES) I said I hoped it would go well but that he was too kind. And then I went to the big dugout where my drivers had been placed.


MANERA: Hey, this is going to be a dirty mess, eh, Tenente?


FREDERIC: Yes.


GORDINI: They will shell us to very little pieces.


FREDERIC: They will surely try, Gordini.


MANERA: Tenente, what if we take San Gabriele? What if we take the Carso and Monfalcone? Where are we then? Did you see all the far mountains to-day? 


FREDERIC: Yes.


MANERA: Do you think we could take all them too? Only if the Austrians stop fighting. 


GAVUZZI: One side must stop fighting. 


GORDINI: Why don't we stop fighting? 


PASSINI: Yes, if the Austrians come down into Italy they will get tired and go away. They have their own country. But no, instead there is a war. 


FREDERIC: You're an orator, Passini.


PASSINI: We think. We read. We are not peasants. We are mechanics. And even the peasants know better than to believe in a war. Everybody hates this war.


MANERA: There is a class that controls a country that is stupid; does not realize anything, never can. 


GAVUZZI: Also they make money out of it.


PASSINI: Most of them don't, Gavuzzi. It's as Manera says. They are too stupid. They do it for nothing! For stupidity!


MANERA: Eh, we must shut up. We talk too much even for Tenente.


GORDINI: Hey, do we eat yet, Tenente?


FREDERIC: I'll go and see.


MANERA: Is there anything I can do, Tenente? Can I help in any way?


FREDERIC: Come with me if you want, Manera.


MANERA: Of course.


MUSIC: BEHIND FREDERIC--


FREDERIC: (NARRATES) It was dark outside and the long light from the searchlights was moving over the mountains. It was quiet as we crossed the brickyard to the main dressing station where the major was sitting at a field-telephone. And as we returned to the dugout with food, from all the guns behind us the bombardment started.


MUSIC: ACCENT ... THEN OUT BEHIND--


SOUND: MASSIVE BOMBARDMENT! ... CONTINUES IN BG--


FREDERIC: Here you are, patriots.


PASSINI: How are the cars, Tenente?


FREDERIC: All right.


GORDINI: Hey, did they scare you, Tenente?


FREDERIC: You bet they did. Put the basin of macaroni on the floor, Manera. We'll all eat.


GORDINI: There are no forks.


PASSINI: But there are hands. Eat!


FREDERIC: Here, give me your pocketknife, Passini. The cheese is covered with brick dust.


PASSINI: There is wine in my canteen. In the corner, Gavuzzi.


FREDERIC: Everybody eat!


SOUND: AN ESPECIALLY LOUD EXPLOSION NEARBY


GAVUZZI: (UNHAPPILY) Four hundred twenty.


FREDERIC: No, there aren't any four hundred twenties in the mountains.


PASSINI: They have big Skoda guns. I've seen the holes.


FREDERIC: Three hundred fives, Passini.


SOUND: ANOTHER NEARBY EXPLOSION 


PASSINI: Ah! This isn't a deep dugout.


FREDERIC: That was a big trench mortar.


PASSINI: Yes, sir.


MUSIC: IN BG--


FREDERIC: (NARRATES) I ate the end of my piece of cheese and took a swallow of wine. And then it came.


SOUND: EXPLOSION! A DIRECT HIT ... BOMBARDMENT CONTINUES IN BG


MUSIC: UP, FOR A BIG ACCENT ... THEN IN BG--


PASSINI: (IN GREAT PAIN) Mama mia! Mama mia! Stop it! Stop it! (CONTINUES IN BG)


FREDERIC: (NARRATES) After the blast and the pain and the floating lights, I heard somebody crying. I tried to move but I could not move. I heard the machine-guns and rifles firing across the river. All this in a moment. And then the crying came close. It was Passini and when I touched him he screamed.


PASSINI: (LONG BLOODCURDLING SCREAM IN PAIN)


FREDERIC: (NARRATES) His legs were toward me and I saw that they were both smashed above the knee. Then he was quiet, and unmoving, and dead. Now there were three others to locate. I sat up. My legs felt warm and wet and my shoes were wet and warm inside. I knew that I was hit and leaned over and put my hand on my knee. My knee wasn't there. It was down on my shin. I wiped my hand on my shirt and another floating light came very slowly down and I looked at my leg and was very afraid. 


MANERA: Tenente!


FREDERIC: (NARRATES) Some one took hold of me under the arms and somebody else lifted my legs.


MUSIC: OUT BEHIND--


SOUND: SHELL WHISTLES DOWN FROM ABOVE AND EXPLODES NEARBY


MANERA: Tenente!


FREDERIC: There are three others. One is dead. (COUGHS BEHIND--)


MANERA: This is Manera, Tenente. We went for a stretcher but there was nothing. How are you?


FREDERIC: Where is Gordini and Gavuzzi?


MANERA: Gordini's at the post getting bandaged. Gavuzzi has your legs. Hold on to my neck, Tenente. Are you badly hit?


FREDERIC: In the leg. How is Gordini?


MANERA: He's all right. It was a big trench mortar shell.


FREDERIC: Passini's dead.


MANERA: Yes. He's dead.


SOUND: NEARBY EXPLOSION ... MEN DROP FREDERIC ... THEN HURRIEDLY PICK HIM UP BEHIND--


MANERA: I'm sorry, Tenente. Hang onto my neck.


FREDERIC: (ANGRY) If you drop me again--


MANERA: It was because we were scared.


FREDERIC: (EXHALES) Are you unwounded?


MANERA: Eh, we were both wounded a little.


FREDERIC: Can Gordini drive?


MANERA: I don't think so.


FREDERIC: (EXCLAIMS, IN PAIN ... WHIMPERS)


MANERA: Sorry, Tenente. We won't drop you again.


MUSIC: TRANSITION ... THEN BEHIND FREDERIC--


FREDERIC: (NARRATES) In the ward at the field hospital they told me a visitor was coming to see me in the afternoon. It was a hot day and there were many flies in the room. Lying on the cot in my dirty bandages, I thought about Catherine seeing my name on the wounded list. I could easily guess what Ferguson would say. It was very obvious to me what Ferguson would be saying.


FERGUSON: I knew it! Oh, I knew it! Already he's been wounded. You're going to be sorry about this, Catherine. There can be worse trouble than this and you'll be sorry.


CATHERINE: Oh, stop it, Fergy. No use talking that way.


FERGUSON: This time he's been wounded. Next time he may never come back.


CATHERINE: "Never" isn't a pretty word.


FERGUSON: Sometimes you can't use pretty words.


CATHERINE: Oh, Fergy, stop it now. No one ever knows anything or is sure of anything in a war. Men go to the front and some of them come back and some of them don't. And women can't expect to have any more luck than the men. It's very simple, after all. It's a dreadful thing; a terrible way for women to live, but there's absolutely nothing you can do about it.


FERGUSON: I don't understand why you're talking like this.


CATHERINE: That's very simple, too, Fergy. I'm in love with him. I'm in love with him and there's absolutely nothing I can do about it.


MUSIC: TRANSITION ... THEN BEHIND FREDERIC--


FREDERIC: (NARRATES) My visitor that afternoon was Rinaldi and he came in very fast and bent down over the bed and kissed me. 


RINALDI: How are you, baby? How you feel? I bring you a bottle of cognac and good news. You will be decorated. 


FREDERIC: Huh? What for?


RINALDI: Because you are gravely wounded. Tell me exactly what happened. Did you do any heroic act?


FREDERIC: No. I was blown up while we were eating cheese.


RINALDI: Ohhh, be serious, baby. You must have done something heroic either before or after. Didn't you carry anybody on your back? Gordini says--


FREDERIC: I didn't carry anybody. I couldn't move.


RINALDI: Well, that doesn't matter. Didn't you refuse to be medically aided before the others?


FREDERIC: Not very firmly.


RINALDI: Well, it doesn't matter. It was all a great success.


FREDERIC: Did they cross the river?


RINALDI: Enormously. 


FREDERIC: How is everything?


RINALDI: Splendid. We are all splendid. Everybody is proud of you. And here now is some cognac.


SOUND: BOTTLE ON GLASS ... DRINK POURED


FREDERIC: (CHUCKLES)


RINALDI: There! Drink that, baby. How is your poor head? 


FREDERIC: (DRINKS, EXHALES)


RINALDI: I looked at your papers. You haven't any fracture. Only your leg. They will probably have to operate. Ah, that major at the first post was a hog-butcher. I would take you and never hurt you. You must forgive me for talking so much, baby. I am very moved to see you badly wounded. The cognac is good, isn't it?


FREDERIC: (EXHALES) Yes.


RINALDI: (LAUGHS) It ought to be good. It cost fifteen lire. Five stars. 


FREDERIC: Rinaldi, have you seen Miss Barkley?


RINALDI: I will bring her to you. I will go now and arrange it. You are going to be taken to the new American hospital at Milan, you know.


FREDERIC: Oh, don't go yet. Tell me about things.


RINALDI: Oh, I wish you were going to be back with me, baby. No one to come in at night from adventures. No one to make fun of. No one to lend me money. 


FREDERIC: (CHUCKLES)


RINALDI: We are war brothers! We love each other!


FREDERIC: You be good while I'm gone.


RINALDI: I will arrange to send Miss Barkley to Milan. You are better for her than me. You are purer and sweeter.


FREDERIC: And you're an ignorant, frozen-faced, no-account--


RINALDI: Ha ha! Don't be angry, baby. Laugh! Take another drink! I must go, really. Kiss me good-by.


FREDERIC: You're sloppy.


RINALDI: No. I am just more affectionate. But I won't kiss you if you don't want. I will send your English girl to Milan. (MOVING OFF, HEARTILY) Good-by, baby! The cognac is under the bed! Get well soon!


MUSIC: TRANSITION ... THEN BEHIND FREDERIC--


FREDERIC: (NARRATES) The next day in the morning I left for Milan. It was a bad trip. The pain went on and on and I could feel it going in and out of the bone. Everything was new at the hospital and they were not prepared for wounded yet. There was no room ready and the doctor was in Lake Como and no one knew anything about a Miss Barkley. I slept badly with the pain, but when I woke in the morning I heard someone coming along the hall and the door opened. It was Catherine Barkley. She stood there for a moment. She looked fresh and young and very beautiful. When I saw her, everything turned over inside me and I knew that I was really in love with her. She looked up and down the hall, saw there was no one, and then she came to the side of the bed and leaned over and kissed me. 


CATHERINE: Hello, darling.


FREDERIC: Oh, you sweet. Weren't you wonderful to come here?


CATHERINE: It wasn't very hard. Rinaldi arranged it. Ferguson and I were transferred together. But it may be hard for me to stay.


FREDERIC: You've got to stay. Oh, you're wonderful. I want to hold you.


CATHERINE: You mustn't. You're not well enough.


FREDERIC: Yes, I am. Please.


CATHERINE: (BEAT, BREATHES) Feel our hearts beating.


FREDERIC: I don't care about our hearts. Oh, you're lovely. You've got to stay. They can't send you away. I'm crazy in love with you.


CATHERINE: We'll have to be awfully careful. You'll have to be careful in front of other people.


FREDERIC: I will.


CATHERINE: You'll have to be. Now, I must go, darling. Really. The doctor's coming. He telephoned from Milan. [Lake Como]


FREDERIC: Oh. When does he get here?


CATHERINE: He'll be here this afternoon. I'll come back when I can.


MUSIC: TRANSITION ... THEN BEHIND FREDERIC--


FREDERIC: (NARRATES) The doctor decided to operate on my leg the next morning. It was good that Catherine was there. She stayed on duty that night and it was good to have her near. A breeze came in the night and we watched the beam of a searchlight move across the sky and we heard the men of the anti-aircraft gun on the next roof talking. And then I went to sleep. And in the morning when it was light Catherine came in looking fresh and lovely and sat on the bed. As the sun rose we could smell the dew on the roofs of the town.


CATHERINE: Now, you be careful, darling. You've such a lovely temperature and we don't want to spoil that. I'm awfully proud of your temperature, darling.


FREDERIC: Maybe all our children will have fine temperatures.


CATHERINE: (CHUCKLES) Our children will probably have beastly temperatures. Oh, darling, when you're going under the ether please think about something else -- not us. Because people get very blabby under an anaesthetic.


FREDERIC: What should I think about?


CATHERINE: Anything. Anything but us. Think about your people. Or even any other girl.


FREDERIC: No.


CATHERINE: Say your prayers then. That ought to create a splendid impression.


FREDERIC: (DEFINITELY) I won't talk at all.


CATHERINE: (AMUSED) Now you're bragging, darling. Just start your prayers when they tell you to breathe deeply. You'll be lovely that way and I'll be so proud of you. I'm very proud of you anyway. 


FREDERIC: Hm.


CATHERINE: You have such a lovely temperature and you sleep like a little boy with your arm around the pillow -- and dream that it's me. (BEAT) Or is it some other girl? 


FREDERIC: Oh, it's you.


CATHERINE: I hope so. How many people have you ever loved?


FREDERIC: Nobody.


CATHERINE: Not me even?


FREDERIC: Yes, you.


CATHERINE: How many others really?


FREDERIC: None.


CATHERINE: You're lying to me.


FREDERIC: (BEAT) Yes.


CATHERINE: It's all right. Keep right on lying to me. That's what I want you to do. Were they pretty?


FREDERIC: I don't know anything about it.


CATHERINE: You're just mine. That's true and you've never belonged to any one else. But I don't care if you have. I'm not afraid of them. But don't tell me about them. Please, darling, don't ever tell me.


MUSIC: TRANSITION ... THEN BEHIND FREDERIC--


FREDERIC: (NARRATES) When I was awake after the operation I saw sandbags at the end of the bed. They were on pipes that came up out of the cast. And there was a strange nurse in the room. And I recognized her. It was Ferguson.


FERGUSON: How is it now?


FREDERIC: Oh, it's better.


FERGUSON: He did a wonderful job on your knee.


FREDERIC: How long did it take?


FERGUSON: Two hours and a half.


FREDERIC: Did I say anything silly?


FERGUSON: (CHUCKLES) Not a thing. Now, don't talk. Just be quiet.


MUSIC: TRANSITION ... THEN BEHIND FREDERIC--


FREDERIC: (NARRATES) Catherine was greatly liked by the nurses because she would do night duty indefinitely and there was no indication that she would be sent away. I loved her very much and she loved me. I slept in the daytime, too, and sometimes we wrote notes during the day when we were awake and sent them by Ferguson. 


FERGUSON: How are you feeling to-day?


FREDERIC: Fine. And I'm writing an important note. Will you come to our wedding, Fergy?


FERGUSON: You'll never get married.


FREDERIC: We will.


FERGUSON: No you won't.


FREDERIC: Why not?


FERGUSON: You'll fight before you marry.


FREDERIC: We never fight.


FERGUSON: Well, you've time yet.


FREDERIC: Ah, we don't fight.


FERGUSON: Well, you'll die then. Fight or die. (READY TO WEEP) That's what people do. They don't marry.


FREDERIC: (SURPRISED) Fergy! (BEAT, SYMPATHETIC) Give me your hand. 


FERGUSON: Don't - don't - don't take hold of me. I'm not crying. Maybe you'll be all right you two. But watch out for yourselves.


FREDERIC: We will. You're a fine girl, Fergy.


FERGUSON: I'm not. Don't try to flatter me. How does your leg feel?


FREDERIC: All right.


FERGUSON: You're a lucky young man. Have you the letter done? I'm going down.


MUSIC: TRANSITION ... THEN BEHIND FREDERIC--


FREDERIC: (NARRATES) We had a lovely time that summer. When I could go out, we went to the cathedral and we rode in a carriage in the park. I remember the carriage, the horse going slowly, and up ahead the back of the driver with his varnished high hat, and Catherine sitting beside me. Even if we let our hands touch, just the side of my hand touching hers, we were excited. 


SOUND: HORSE-AND-CARRIAGE BACKGROUND


CATHERINE: Oh, darling, I couldn't feel any more married. There isn't any me any more. I'm you. Don't I make you a good wife?


FREDERIC: You're a lovely wife.


CATHERINE: You see, darling, I had one experience of waiting to be married.


FREDERIC: I - don't want to hear about it.


CATHERINE: You know I don't love any one but you. You shouldn't mind because some one else loved me.


FREDERIC: I do.


CATHERINE: You shouldn't be jealous of someone who's dead when you have everything.


FREDERIC: No, but I don't want to hear about it.


CATHERINE: Poor darling. Don't worry. I won't ever leave you for some one else. I suppose all sorts of dreadful things will happen to us. But you don't have to worry about that. 


FREDERIC: I'll - have to go back to the front pretty soon.


CATHERINE: We won't think about that until you go. You see, I'm happy, darling, and we have a lovely time. I haven't been happy for a long while and - and when I met you perhaps I was nearly crazy. Perhaps I was crazy. But now we're happy and we love each other. You are happy, aren't you? Is there anything I do you don't like? Can I do anything to please you? 


MUSIC: TRANSITION ... THEN BEHIND FREDERIC--


FREDERIC: (NARRATES) The summer went that way. I don't remember much about the days, except that they were hot and there were many victories in the papers. My legs were healing quickly and it was not long before I was on crutches and then walking with a cane. One night late in the summer, we were talking softly out on the balcony. There was a mist over the town and in a little while the mist turned to rain and we came in. Soon it was raining hard and we could hear it drumming on the roof. I got up to see if it was raining in but it wasn't, so I left the door open.


SOUND: HARD RAIN BACKGROUND


CATHERINE: (TENSE) Listen to it. Such a sound.


FREDERIC: It's raining very hard now.


CATHERINE: Darling, you'll always love me, won't you?


FREDERIC: Of course.


CATHERINE: And the rain won't make any difference?


FREDERIC: No.


CATHERINE: That's good. Because I'm afraid of the rain.


FREDERIC: Why?


CATHERINE: I don't know, darling. I've always been afraid of the rain.


FREDERIC: I like it.


CATHERINE: I like to walk in it. But - but it's very hard on loving.


FREDERIC: I'll love you always.


CATHERINE: I'll love you in the rain and in the snow and in the hail-- And what else is there?


FREDERIC: (CHUCKLE) I don't know. (BEAT) You're not - really afraid of the rain are you?


CATHERINE: (LOVINGLY) Not when I'm with you.


FREDERIC: Why are you afraid of it?


CATHERINE: I don't know.


FREDERIC: Tell me.


CATHERINE: Don't make me.


FREDERIC: Tell me.


CATHERINE: All right. I'm afraid of the rain because - sometimes I see me dead in it.


FREDERIC: (SURPRISED, QUIETLY) Catherine!


CATHERINE: And sometimes I see you dead in it.


FREDERIC: That's more likely.


CATHERINE: No, it's not, darling. Because I can keep you safe. I know I can. But nobody can help themselves.


FREDERIC: Now, please stop this now. We won't be together much longer.


CATHERINE: I'll stop it. It's all nonsense.


FREDERIC: Yes, it's all nonsense.


CATHERINE: (INCREASINGLY HYSTERICAL) It's all nonsense. It's only nonsense. I'm not afraid of the rain. I'm not afraid of the rain! Oh, dear God, I wish I wasn't. (BURSTS INTO TEARS)


MUSIC: CURTAIN


SOUND: APPLAUSE


ANNOUNCER: From Studio One, radio's celebrated playhouse of dramatic entertainment, you are hearing Miss Madeleine Carroll starring in "A Farewell to Arms" by Ernest Hemingway, one of the world's greatest stories in a special version for listening by Fletcher Markle. 


MUSIC: IN BG


ANNOUNCER: Tonight's story will resume after the customary pause for station identification. This is CBS, the Columbia Broadcasting System.


MUSIC: CONTINUES, FILLING THE PAUSE FOR STATION IDENTIFICATION


SOUND: TRANSITIONAL PAUSE


MUSIC: AN INTRODUCTION ... THEN IN BG--


ANNOUNCER: From Studio One, we continue tonight's full-hour dramatic entertainment. Miss Madeleine Carroll stars in Fletcher Markle's production of "A Farewell to Arms" by Ernest Hemingway.


MUSIC: UP, TO FILL A PAUSE ... THEN BEHIND FREDERIC--


FREDERIC: (NARRATES) In September the first cool nights came, and then the days were cool and the leaves on the trees in the park began to turn color and we knew the summer was gone. The fighting at the front went very badly and they could not take San Gabriele. My leg was now as well as it would get for a long time and in October I got word that I would receive three weeks' convalescent leave and then return to the front. I told Catherine about it as soon as she came off duty that day.


CATHERINE: (CHEERFUL) Well, that's lovely, darling. Where do you want to go?


FREDERIC: Nowhere. I want to stay here.


CATHERINE: That's silly. You pick a place to go and I'll come too.


FREDERIC: How will you work it?


CATHERINE: I don't know. But I will. If necessary I'll simply leave.


FREDERIC: You're such a good girl. Where should we go?


CATHERINE: (INCREASINGLY TAUT AND UPSET) I don't care. Anywhere you want. Anywhere we don't know people.


FREDERIC: Don't you care where we go?


CATHERINE: No. I'll like any place.


FREDERIC: (BEAT) Now, Catherine, what's the matter?


CATHERINE: Nothing. Nothing's the matter.


FREDERIC: I know there is. Tell me, darling.


CATHERINE: It's nothing.


FREDERIC: Tell me.


CATHERINE: I don't want to. I - I'm afraid I'll make you unhappy or worry you.


FREDERIC: No, it won't.


CATHERINE: You're sure? It doesn't worry me but I'm - I'm afraid to worry you.


FREDERIC: It won't if it doesn't worry you.


CATHERINE: Do I have to?


FREDERIC: Yes.


CATHERINE: I'm going to have a baby, darling. It's almost three months along. You're not worried, are you? Please, please don't.


FREDERIC: I'm not worried. Only about you.


CATHERINE: Oh, that's what you mustn't do. People have babies all the time. Everybody has babies! 


FREDERIC: (AMUSED) You are a fine girl.


CATHERINE: No, I'm not. But I try to be a good wife to you.


FREDERIC: You are.


CATHERINE: (FORCED GAIETY) And please don't worry. We'll be all right, and-- And I'll-- I'll write you every day while you're at the front.


FREDERIC: Where will you be?


CATHERINE: I don't know yet, but somewhere splendid. I'll look after all that.


FREDERIC: We should have a drink to all this. Would you like a brandy?


CATHERINE: No, thank you. It only makes me dizzy. But you have one.


FREDERIC: Didn't you ever drink brandy?


CATHERINE: (QUIETLY) No, darling. I'm a very old-fashioned wife.


MUSIC: TRANSITION ... THEN BEHIND FREDERIC--


FREDERIC: (NARRATES) The night I was to return to the front, Catherine and I walked to the cathedral square in Milan and had a farewell dinner in a front room in a little hotel at the far end of the square. We drank a bottle of capri and ate very slowly, and afterwards Catherine said--


CATHERINE: Oh, it's a fine room.


FREDERIC: And you're a fine girl.


CATHERINE: I'm a very simple girl.


FREDERIC: I didn't think so at first. 


CATHERINE: I know. I was a little crazy. But I wasn't crazy in any complicated manner. I didn't confuse you, did I, darling?


FREDERIC: (AMUSED) No.


CATHERINE: We have such a fine time now. I don't take any interest in anything else any more. I'm so very happily married to you.


SOUND: CLOCK CHIMES SEVEN, IN BG


FREDERIC: "But at my back I always hear / Time's winged chariot hurrying near."


CATHERINE: I know that poem. It's by Marvell. But it's about a girl who wouldn't live with a man.


FREDERIC: It's nearly time to go. (BEAT) How often will you write?


CATHERINE: Every day. Do they read your letters?


FREDERIC: They can't read English enough to hurt any.


CATHERINE: (LIGHTLY) I'll make them very confusing.


FREDERIC: But not too confusing. (BEAT) I'm afraid we have to start to go.


CATHERINE: All right, darling. We're never settled anywhere very long, are we?


FREDERIC: We will be.


CATHERINE: I'll have a fine home for you when you come back.


FREDERIC: Maybe I'll be back right away.


CATHERINE: (LIGHTLY) Perhaps you'll be hurt just a little in the foot.


FREDERIC: Yes. Or the lobe of the ear.


CATHERINE: No, I want your ears the way they are.


FREDERIC: And not my feet?


CATHERINE: Your feet have been hit already.


FREDERIC: We have to go, darling. Really.


CATHERINE: All right. You go first.


MUSIC: FOR A PARTING, IN BG--


FREDERIC: (NARRATES) We drove in a carriage to the station in the rain. The rain was clear and transparent against the light from the station. We stopped and I turned to Catherine. Her face was in the shadow from the hood of the carriage.


SOUND: LIGHT RAIN FALLS


CATHERINE: It's raining, darling.


FREDERIC: Yes, but it's a soft rain. (BEAT) We might as well say good-by.


CATHERINE: I can't go in?


FREDERIC: No. Good-by, Cat.


CATHERINE: Will you tell the driver to take me back to the hospital?


FREDERIC: I have already. Good-by. Take good care of yourself and Young Catherine.


CATHERINE: Yes. Good-by, darling.


FREDERIC: (NARRATES) I stepped out into the rain and the carriage started. 


SOUND: HORSE-AND-CARRIAGE TROTS AWAY


FREDERIC: (NARRATES) Catherine leaned out and I saw her face in the light. She smiled and waved and the carriage went up the street.


MUSIC: UP, TO FILL A BRIEF PAUSE ... THEN BEHIND FREDERIC--


FREDERIC: (NARRATES) Back at the front, the trees were all bare and the roads were muddy. We crossed the river and I saw that it was running high. It had been raining in the mountains, too. I reported to the major and then went up to my room, the room I shared with Rinaldi. He wasn't in the room, but his things were there. I lay on the bed and thought about Catherine and waited for him. It didn't feel like a homecoming until Rinaldi came in. We talked and he was very funny.


RINALDI: (LAUGHS HEARTILY) Well, baby! Good old baby. It's fine to have you back. Let me see your knee.


FREDERIC: Oh, it's all right.


RINALDI: But I want to see what kind of a job they did in Milan. I don't trust them.


FREDERIC: (WITH EFFORT, LOWERS PANTS) Here. Look for yourself.


RINALDI: (BEAT, AS HE EXAMINES KNEE) Ah. Mm hm. Is that all the articulation you have?


FREDERIC: Yes.


RINALDI: Oh, it's a crime to send you back, baby. They ought to get complete articulation.


FREDERIC: It's a lot better than it was. It was very stiff-- (PULLS UP PANTS, IN PAIN) Oooh!


RINALDI: Yes. Yes, you ought to have more treatment on it with the machines. But the knee itself is a good job. Now then, tell me more about everything.


FREDERIC: Oh, there's nothing more to tell. I've led a quiet life.


RINALDI: You do act like a married man. What's the matter with you?


FREDERIC: Nothing. What's the matter with you?


RINALDI: Oh, this war is very depressing. All summer and all fall I have operated. I never think any more; I operate. Believe me, baby, I am becoming a wonderful surgeon.


FREDERIC: Good.


RINALDI: Come! We will have a drink.


FREDERIC: All right.


RINALDI: It's Austrian cognac. Seven stars. It's all they captured on San Gabriele.


FREDERIC: Oh, were you up there?


RINALDI: No. I haven't been anywhere. This war is terrible. I've been here all the time operating. Look, baby, this is your tooth-brushing glass. 


FREDERIC: (CHUCKLES)


RINALDI: I kept it all the time to remind me of you.


FREDERIC: To remind you to brush your teeth.


RINALDI: No. I have my own too. 


FREDERIC: You're an ape.


RINALDI: I know, you are the fine good Anglo-Saxon boy. I know. (CHUCKLES) Here.


FREDERIC: Thank you.


SOUND: CLINK! OF GLASSES


RINALDI: We drink to your English girl.


FREDERIC: (QUIETLY) Yes. To Catherine.


MUSIC: TRANSITION ... THEN BEHIND FREDERIC--


FREDERIC: (NARRATES) For a long time, there were only small attacks and counter-attacks. And then one night the wind rose and at three o'clock in the morning with the rain coming in sheets there was a great bombardment and Rinaldi was killed.


MUSIC: UP, FOR A BIG GRIM ACCENT ... THEN OUT


FREDERIC: (NARRATES) The next night, the Austrians broke through the lines up toward Caporetto and the order came through to retreat.


SOUND: RETREAT BACKGROUND ... RAIN, AMBULANCE LURCHING THROUGH MUD, ET CETERA


FREDERIC: (NARRATES) In the night, going slowly along the crowded roads we passed troops marching under the rain, horses, wagons, mules, motor trucks, all moving away from the front. At the beginning, the retreat was orderly, wet and sullen. We moved slowly and haltingly in the rain, the radiator cap of our car close to the tailboard of the truck ahead of us, and there were many stops. 


SOUND: ALL FADES OUT ... EXCEPT FOR THE POURING RAIN BEHIND--


FREDERIC: (NARRATES) Just before dawn, the column stalled and did not start again for a long time. My driver was exhausted.


MANERA: (SIGHS) We sleep now.


FREDERIC: (NARRATES) Manera slept, and I was alone. And I heard myself say out loud: "Good-night, Catherine. I hope you sleep well. Try and go to sleep, sweet."


MUSIC: SNEAKS IN DURING ABOVE ... FOR A DREAM ... IN BG


CATHERINE: I was asleep - all the time. You've been talking in your sleep. Are you all right? 


FREDERIC: Are you really there? 


CATHERINE: Of course I'm here. I wouldn't go away. This doesn't make any difference between us. 


FREDERIC: You're so lovely and sweet. You wouldn't go away in the night, would you? 


CATHERINE: Of course I wouldn't go away. I'm always here. I come whenever you want me. I--


MUSIC: OUT WITH--


SOUND: LOUD CRUNCH! ... AS AMBULANCE GETS IN GEAR AND STARTS DOWN ROAD


MANERA: They've started again.


FREDERIC: I - I was dozing.


MANERA: I woke up. You talked out loud.


FREDERIC: I was having a fine dream.


MANERA: Ah, good, good.


SOUND: RETREAT BACKGROUND RESUMES ... JOINED BY DRONE OF AEROPLANES BEHIND--


FREDERIC: (NARRATES) And now the retreat lost its order, and it was very wet and cold, and everyone was hungry and weak. Planes came now and bombed the high roads.


SOUND: BOMBS ... TWO EXPLOSIONS! ... ENGINES SLOW TO A STOP ... RAIN AND BOMBS CONTINUE TO FALL IN BG


FREDERIC: (NARRATES) The cars and trucks sank in the mud, and soon nearly everyone around us was lurching along on foot. Or lying in the ditches. Or hiding. Or dead.


SOUND: SCENE FADES OUT


FREDERIC: (NARRATES) You do not know how long you are in a nightmare like that retreat from Caporetto. It is long and slow and there is no food and no sleep and no time. But when it became rumored that there were Germans in Italian uniforms mixing with the retreat and that many officers were being shot on the merest suspicion by the Italian battle police, I knew that now there had been enough of all of it for me. I deserted the bruised and broken column I had been moving with. I deserted the war.


MUSIC: TRANSITION ... THEN BEHIND FREDERIC--


FREDERIC: (NARRATES) Somehow I got to a railway line and climbed aboard a flat-car in a freight train going south with guns. I dropped off the train in Milan as it slowed into the station in the early morning. I bought some civilian clothes from a friend and destroyed all of my papers except my old passports. Then I rode out to the American hospital and went to the porter's lodge. The porter and his wife were glad to see me. 


PORTER'S WIFE: Ah, you are back. You are safe.


FREDERIC: Yes. Tell me, is Miss Barkley here at the hospital now?


PORTER: Miss Barkley?


FREDERIC: The English lady nurse.


PORTER'S WIFE: His girl.


PORTER: No, she is away.


FREDERIC: You're sure? I mean the tall blonde English young lady.


PORTER: I am sure. She is gone to Stresa.


PORTER'S WIFE: That is true.


FREDERIC: When did she go?


PORTER: She went two days ago with the other lady inglese.


MUSIC: TRANSITION ... THEN BEHIND FREDERIC--


FREDERIC: (NARRATES) I bought a ticket to Stresa and rode through the Lombard country feeling lonely and sad. At Stresa, I went straight to the Grand Hotel where I knew the barman from times when I had spent leaves there. He was surprised to see me.


EMILIO: But this is not the season, Tenente. What are you doing here?


FREDERIC: I'm on leave, Emilio. Convalescing-leave.


EMILIO: But there is almost no one around. I don't know why they keep the hotel open.


FREDERIC: Did you ever get the American tobacco I sent you?


EMILIO: Yes. Thank you. Lasted a long time.


FREDERIC: Tell me, have you seen two English girls in the town? They came here day before yesterday.


EMILIO: Well, they are not staying at this hotel, Tenente.


FREDERIC: They're nurses, and one of them is my wife.


EMILIO: Oh, yes! I've seen two nurses. They're at the little hotel near the station. Ho ho! I am glad to hear you are married, Tenente.


MUSIC: TRANSITION ... THEN BEHIND FREDERIC--


FREDERIC: (NARRATES) It was very thrilling to see Catherine again and we had an evening of great celebration. The following morning, looking out the window of our room at the sunlight on the lake and the mountains beyond, Catherine said--


CATHERINE: Darling, won't they arrest you if they catch you out of uniform?


FREDERIC: (MISERABLE) They'll probably shoot me.


CATHERINE: Then we won't stay here. We'll get out of the country.


FREDERIC: I'd thought something of that.


CATHERINE: We'll get out. Darling, you shouldn't take silly chances. You're liable to be arrested here any time. I won't have it. And where would we be if they took you off?


FREDERIC: Let's not think about it. I'm tired of thinking about it.


CATHERINE: I won't let you go out of the hotel again until we leave here.


FREDERIC: (SNAPPISH) Where are we going to go?


CATHERINE: Please don't be that way, darling. We'll go wherever you say. 


FREDERIC: Well, Switzerland is down the lake. We can go there.


CATHERINE: That will be lovely.


FREDERIC: I wish we didn't have to live like criminals.


CATHERINE: Darling, don't be that way. You haven't lived like a criminal very long. And we never live like criminals. We're going to have a fine time.


FREDERIC: I feel like a criminal. I've deserted from the army.


CATHERINE: From the war, you mean. You don't really feel like a criminal, do you?


FREDERIC: No. Not when I'm with you.


CATHERINE: And we'll always be with you, darling -- Little Catherine and I. And we'll go with you any place, any time you wish.


MUSIC: TRANSITION ... THEN BEHIND FREDERIC--


FREDERIC: (NARRATES) That night there was a storm and I woke to hear the rain lashing the window-panes. Some one had knocked on the door. I got up quietly, not to disturb Catherine, and opened it. It was Emilio, the barman.


SOUND: STORM BACKGROUND ... MOSTLY POURING RAIN


EMILIO: Can I speak to you, Tenente?


FREDERIC: What's the matter, Emilio?


EMILIO: A very serious matter.


FREDERIC: What is it? Are you in trouble?


EMILIO: No. You are, Tenente. They are going to arrest you in the morning.


FREDERIC: Arrest me?


EMILIO: I came to tell you. I was out in town and I heard them talking in a café. They know you were here before as an officer and now you are here out of uniform. After this retreat they arrest everybody.


FREDERIC: Oh. What time will they come?


EMILIO: In the morning. I don't know the time.


FREDERIC: What do you say to do?


EMILIO: Go to Switzerland.


FREDERIC: How?


EMILIO: In my boat. The storm is over. It's rough but you'll be all right. Go right away. They might come to arrest you very early.


FREDERIC: What about our bags?


EMILIO: Get them packed. Get your wife dressed. I'll take the bags out of the servants' entrance and go to the boat. You know where it is, Tenent'?


FREDERIC: Yes, you showed me yesterday.


EMILIO: Good. Hurry, Tenent'. Just walk out downstairs as though you were going for a walk.


MUSIC: BRIEF TRANSITION ... THEN BEHIND FREDERIC--


FREDERIC: (NARRATES) We got dressed and went out into the night. There was a cold, wet November wind and I knew it was snowing in the mountains. We went down to the chained boats in the slips along the quay where I had seen the barman's little boat. Emilio stepped out from the shadows.


SOUND: STORM BACKGROUND ... WIND AND RAIN


EMILIO: The bags are in the boat, Tenente.


FREDERIC: I want to pay you for the boat.


EMILIO: You send me the money later. That'll be all right.


CATHERINE: But how much, signor?


EMILIO: What you wish. In the boat are sandwiches and a bottle of brandy.


FREDERIC: Well, let me pay you for those then.


EMILIO: All right, give me fifty lire. You'd better get in, and let the lady be careful.


CATHERINE: I will, thank you. 


SOUND: CATHERINE CLIMBS INTO BOAT BEHIND--


CATHERINE: (TO FREDERIC) Darling, do you know where to go?


FREDERIC: Uh, up the lake.


EMILIO: You know how far?


FREDERIC: Past Luino.


EMILIO: Past Luino, Cannero, Tranzano. The wind is with you, but you aren't in Switzerland until you come to Brissago. 


CATHERINE: What time is it, darling?


FREDERIC: (CHECKS HIS WATCH) It's - only eleven o'clock.


EMILIO: If you row all the time you ought to be there by seven o'clock in the morning.


FREDERIC: Is it that far?


EMILIO: It's thirty-five kilometres. When the wind is strong, use the big umbrella you'll find in the boat. Will help. Good luck to you and -- send me some more American tobacco if you can.


FREDERIC: I will. And good luck to you.


CATHERINE: Thank you so very much, signor. Good luck.


FREDERIC: Are you ready, Cat?


CATHERINE: Yes.


MUSIC: TRANSITION ... THEN BEHIND FREDERIC--


SOUND: NO MORE RAIN ... JUST WIND AND THE STEADY SLOSH OF WATER AS FREDERIC ROWS ... IN BG--


FREDERIC: (NARRATES) I rowed in the dark keeping the wind in my face. The rain had stopped and only came occasionally in gusts. It was very dark, and the wind was cold. 


CATHERINE: I think we're across the lake now, aren't we?


FREDERIC: (WITH SOME EFFORT, AS HE ROWS) I think so. I think I saw the lights of Pallanza back there.


CATHERINE: How are you, darling?


FREDERIC: I'm fine.


CATHERINE: I could take the oars for a while.


FREDERIC: No. I'm fine.


CATHERINE: Poor Ferguson. Tomorrow she'll come to the hotel and find we're gone.


FREDERIC: I'm not worrying so much about that as about getting into the Swiss part of the lake before it's daylight and the custom guards see us.


CATHERINE: Is it a long way yet?


FREDERIC: Yes.


CATHERINE: I'll hold the umbrella up for a while.


MUSIC: BRIEF TRANSITION 


SOUND: SLOSH OF WATER AS FREDERIC ROWS ... IN BG--


FREDERIC: Are you warm enough, Cat?


CATHERINE: I'm all right. Just a little stiff.


FREDERIC: Bail out that water and you can put your feet down.


CATHERINE: And you take a rest. I'll open a sandwich.


MUSIC: UP, FOR A BRIEF TRANSITION 


SOUND: SLOSH OF WATER AS FREDERIC ROWS ... IN BG--


CATHERINE: You must be dead, darling. Let me row a while.


FREDERIC: I'm all right. My hands are sore is all.


CATHERINE: Let me row.


FREDERIC: I don't think you ought to.


CATHERINE: Nonsense. Rowing in moderation would be very good for me. 


MUSIC: UP, FOR A BRIEF TRANSITION ... THEN BEHIND FREDERIC--


SOUND: SLOSH OF WATER AS FREDERIC ROWS ... IN BG--


FREDERIC: (NARRATES) When it was beginning to be daylight we were quite close to the shore. I could see the trees dimly.


SOUND: DISTANT MOTOR BOAT APPROACHES, IN BG ... FREDERIC STOPS ROWING BEHIND--


CATHERINE: (TENSE, LOW) Darling, what's that?


FREDERIC: (LOW) Motor boat. Motor boat; probably customs guards. Whisper.


CATHERINE: Oh, no, darling. It mustn't be. Where are they?


FREDERIC: Astern of us. Don't move.


SOUND: MOTOR BOAT ENGINE SLOWS TO A STOP, OFF ... GENTLE SLOSH OF WATER AGAINST THE BOAT, IN BG


CATHERINE: Can they see us?


FREDERIC: I don't know. I can hardly see them. It looks like three of them in the boat. Maybe four.


CATHERINE: Pray, darling.


FREDERIC: Yes.


CATHERINE: (PAUSE) I think we're all right, darling.


FREDERIC: Yes. Give me some of the brandy, will you?


CATHERINE: (SHIVERS) Of course. That's easy.


MUSIC: TRANSITION ... THEN BEHIND FREDERIC--


FREDERIC: (NARRATES) We knew we were in Switzerland when it was clear daylight and we saw a Swiss soldier walking along the road skirting the shore. We were so excited, we waved to him and he waved back. Presently, we came to a little town hunched around the roads. There were many fishing boats along the quay and nets were spread on racks. It was very thrilling and I pulled hard on the oars and brought us alongside the quay. There was a soft November rain falling and we stepped up to the wet stone and stood in Switzerland. 


SOUND: SOFT RAIN FALLS, IN BG


CATHERINE: What a good feeling, darling!


FREDERIC: Yes.


CATHERINE: And what a lovely country. I love the way it feels under my shoes.


FREDERIC: Isn't it fine? 


CATHERINE: Let's go and have breakfast. Darling, do you realize we're here and out of that awful place?


FREDERIC: I do; more and more every minute.


CATHERINE: Look at the houses. Isn't this a fine square? There's a place over there we can get breakfast.


FREDERIC: They never had rain like this in Italy. It's cheerful rain.


SOUND: LIEUTENANT'S FOOTSTEPS APPROACH ... THEN BEHIND--


CATHERINE: And we're here at last! Do you realize--? (TENSE, LOW) Oh, darling, look. A soldier.


FREDERIC: Yes.


LIEUTENANT: (BUSINESSLIKE) Is this your boat?


FREDERIC: Uh-- Yes.


LIEUTENANT: Where do you come from?


FREDERIC: Up the lake.


LIEUTENANT: Then I have to ask you to come with me.


FREDERIC: Well, where to?


LIEUTENANT: The customs house.


FREDERIC: How 'bout the bags?


LIEUTENANT: You can bring the bags.


MUSIC: TRANSITION 


LIEUTENANT: What nationality are you?


FREDERIC: American and British.


LIEUTENANT: Let me see your passports.


FREDERIC: Of course, Lieutenant.


CATHERINE: Here's mine, darling.


FREDERIC: Thanks. (TO LIEUTENANT) Here you are, sir.


LIEUTENANT: Thank you. Why do you enter Switzerland this way in a boat?


FREDERIC: I, er-- I am a sportsman. Rowing is my great sport. 


CATHERINE: Yes, my husband always rows when he gets a chance.


LIEUTENANT: Why do you come here?


FREDERIC: For the winter sport. We're tourists and we want to do the winter sport.


LIEUTENANT: (STERNLY) This is no place for winter sport.


CATHERINE: We know that. But we want to go where they have the winter sport.


LIEUTENANT: What have you been doing in Italy?


FREDERIC: I - I've been studying architecture. My wife has been studying art.


LIEUTENANT: Why do you leave there?


FREDERIC: We want to do the winter sport. With the war going on you cannot study architecture.


LIEUTENANT: How much money have you?


FREDERIC: Twenty-five hundred lire.


LIEUTENANT: (IMPRESSED, QUIETLY) Well! How much has your wife?


CATHERINE: I have a little over twelve hundred lire.


LIEUTENANT: Indeed! (SUDDENLY VERY FRIENDLY) Well, if you are going for the winter sports, Montreux is the place. My father has a very fine hotel at Montreux and houses to rent.


FREDERIC: (RELIEVED) Oh, that's fine, then. Could you give me the name?


LIEUTENANT: I will write it on this card. It is a very fine place. I think you will like that place.


CATHERINE: Don't we need visas or permits or something?


FREDERIC: Yes. Yes, we - we do.


LIEUTENANT: There! I have given you all the information to find my father. And you do not need to worry about papers. I will give you a provisional visa. (BEAT, A WARM CHUCKLE) You will like my father.


MUSIC: GENTLE ACCENT ... THEN BEHIND FREDERIC--


FREDERIC: (NARRATES) That winter we lived in a brown wooden house in the pine trees on the side of the mountain over Montreux and it was very fine. By the middle of January I had a beard and the winter had settled into bright cold days and hard cold nights. We went for long walks, walking slowly and resting often because of Little Catherine, and we read books and learned many two-handed card games. And at night we always sat in front of a fire.


CATHERINE: Why don't we have some beer tonight instead of tea? It's very good for Young Catherine; it's supposed to keep her small.


FREDERIC: Ha! Young Catherine. That loafer.


CATHERINE: (LAUGHS) She's been very good. She makes very little trouble.


FREDERIC: Of course she's good.


CATHERINE: I love your beard, darling. It's a great success. It looks so stiff and fierce and it's very soft and a great pleasure.


FREDERIC: Do you like it better than without?


CATHERINE: I think so. I like everything now. All of this. I never want it to stop. (BEAT) How are we for money, darling?


FREDERIC: We have plenty. They honored the last sight draft.


CATHERINE: Won't your family want to hear what's happened now they know you're in Switzerland?


FREDERIC: Probably. I'll write them something.


CATHERINE: You'd better. You know, darling, I don't think I'll cut my hair now until after Young Catherine's born. But afterwards I'm going to cut it and then I'll be a fine new and different girl for you. We'll go together and get it cut, or I'll go alone and come and surprise you. You won't say I can't, will you?


FREDERIC: No. I think it would be exciting.


CATHERINE: And maybe I'd look lovely, darling, and be so thin and exciting to you and you'll fall in love with me all over again.


FREDERIC: But I love you enough now. What do you want to do? Ruin me?


CATHERINE: Yes. I want to ruin you.


FREDERIC: Good. That's what I want too.


CATHERINE: (CHUCKLES) All right, then.


MUSIC: TRANSITION ... THEN BEHIND FREDERIC--


FREDERIC: (NARRATES) We had a splendid life. The winter was very beautiful and we were very happy. There were short thaws when the wind blew warm and the snow softened and the air felt like spring, but always the clear hard cold came again and the winter returned. At the end of March the winter broke up and it started raining. 


SOUND: SOFT RAIN FALLS, IN BG


CATHERINE: It won't be long now before Young Catherine, darling.


FREDERIC: I know, and the weather's changing. We'd better move down into a little hotel in the town and be near the hospital.


CATHERINE: Whatever you say. Darling, where will we go afterwards?


FREDERIC: Where would you like?


CATHERINE: To America. And then we'll all be Americans, won't we? That's the law; I looked it up.


FREDERIC: And you want to go to America?


CATHERINE: Yes, I want to see it with you. I want us to go to Niagara Falls.


FREDERIC: Ha! You're a fine girl.


CATHERINE: And there's something else I want to see, but I can't remember it.


FREDERIC: Um, the Woolworth building?


CATHERINE: No.


FREDERIC: The Grand Canyon?


CATHERINE: No. But I'd like to see that.


FREDERIC: Well, what was it?


CATHERINE: The Golden Gate! That's what I want to see. Where is the Golden Gate?


FREDERIC: San Francisco.


CATHERINE: Then let's go there. Oh, darling, we're going to have a fine time, aren't we?


MUSIC: TRANSITION ... THEN BEHIND FREDERIC--


FREDERIC: (NARRATES) We moved into a little hotel in the town and were very comfortable there. And then one morning in April I took Catherine to the hospital. After a while they sent me away and told me to come back later. I went down the empty streets and found a café that was open. I drank a little and talked to the old man who ran the place. And then I went back to the hospital. The doctor met me in the hall.


DOCTOR: You're Mr. Henry?


FREDERIC: Yes. How does it go, doctor?


DOCTOR: It doesn't go.


FREDERIC: What do you mean?


DOCTOR: Just that. I made an examination. Since then I've waited to see. Now I - I think it is possible only with an operation.


FREDERIC: (SHAKEN, TO HIMSELF) Catherine-- (ANXIOUS) What do you think, Doctor?


DOCTOR: I would advise an operation. Have I your permission? The sooner we operate now, the safer.


FREDERIC: Operate as soon as you can.


DOCTOR: Thank you.


MUSIC: TENSE ... BEHIND FREDERIC--


FREDERIC: (NARRATES) I stood in the empty hall and watched the door of the operating room. What if she should die? No, but she wouldn't die, I thought. People don't die in childbirth nowadays. This was what all husbands thought. No, she won't die. She can't die. It's just nature; she can't die. But what if she should die? 


MUSIC: UP, FOR AN ACCENT ... THEN OUT


NURSE: Mr. Henry, I - I'm sorry. The baby was born dead. It was a boy.


FREDERIC: How is she?


NURSE: She's all right. The doctor's with her now. You - you should go and try and have some supper and then come back, if you wish.


MUSIC: BRIEF TRANSITION ... THEN BEHIND FREDERIC--


FREDERIC: (NARRATES) I went down the hall and then down the stairs and out the door of the hospital and down the dark street in the rain to the café. I sat at a corner table for a long time. And then suddenly I knew I had to get back. I paid for whatever it was I'd eaten and walked through the rain up to the hospital. Upstairs, I met the nurse on the landing.


NURSE: I just called you at your hotel.


FREDERIC: Well, what's wrong?


NURSE: Mrs. Henry had a hemorrhage.


FREDERIC: (EXHALES) Can I go in?


NURSE: Not yet, no. The doctor's still with her.


FREDERIC: (BEAT) Is it dangerous?


NURSE: It's very dangerous. 


MUSIC: BRIEF TRANSITION ... THEN BEHIND FREDERIC--


FREDERIC: (NARRATES) The nurse went into the room and shut the door. I sat outside in the hall. Everything was gone inside of me. I didn't think. I couldn't think. I knew she was going to die and I prayed she wouldn't. (A PRAYER) Don't let her die. Oh, God, please don't let her die. Please, please, dear God, don't let her die. (BEAT, NARRATES) The nurse opened the door and motioned for me to come. Catherine did not look up when I came in. I went over to the side of the bed. Catherine looked at me and smiled. I bent down over the bed and started to cry.


CATHERINE: (SOFTLY) Poor darling.


FREDERIC: You're all right, Cat. You're going to be all right.


CATHERINE: I'm going to die. (BEAT) I hate it.


FREDERIC: You'll be all right, Cat. I know you'll be all right.


CATHERINE: (HALTINGLY) I meant to write you a letter to have if anything happened, but I didn't do it.


FREDERIC: Do you want me to get a priest or any one to come and see you?


CATHERINE: Just you. Just you, darling. (BEAT) I'm not afraid. I just hate it.


FREDERIC: Do you want me to do anything, Cat? Can I get you anything?


CATHERINE: No. You - you won't say our things to another girl, will you?


FREDERIC: You know I won't.


CATHERINE: I want you to have girls, though.


FREDERIC: I don't want them.


DOCTOR: I'm sorry, you - you mustn't talk so much. Mr. Henry must go out. He can come back again later.


CATHERINE: All right.


FREDERIC: I'll be right outside, Cat.


CATHERINE: Don't worry, darling. I'm not a bit afraid. It's just - a dirty trick.


MUSIC: BRIEF TRANSITION ... THEN IN BG, OUT GENTLY AT [X]


FREDERIC: (NARRATES) I waited outside in the hall. I waited a long time. The doctor came to the door finally and came over to me. 


DOCTOR: I'm afraid Mrs. Henry is very ill. I'm afraid for her.


FREDERIC: Is she dead?


DOCTOR: No. But she is unconscious.


FREDERIC: (NARRATES) I went into the room and stayed with Catherine until she died. She was unconscious all the time, and it did not take her very long to die. I asked the doctor and the nurses to leave me alone in the room with her. [X] But after I got them out and shut the door and turned off the light, it wasn't any good. It was like saying good-by to a statue. After a while I went out and left the hospital and walked back to the hotel in the rain.


SOUND: RAIN POURS ON THE STREET ... SNEAKS IN DURING ABOVE ... THEN HOLDS FOR A LONG MOMENT ... THEN SLOWLY FADES OUT BEHIND--


MUSIC: CURTAIN


SOUND: APPLAUSE


ANNOUNCER: From Studio One at CBS, you have just heard Miss Madeleine Carroll starring in Fletcher Markle's script and production of "A Farewell to Arms" by Ernest Hemingway, another of the world's greatest stories from radio's celebrated playhouse of dramatic entertainment. The original music was composed by Lana Domian and conducted by Alexander Semmler. Now again, Mr. Markle.


HOST: May a producer identify the members of our cast tonight? In the foreground--


CATHERINE: --Catherine Barkley--


HOST: --was played, of course, by Miss Carroll.


RINALDI: Rinaldi--


HOST: --was played by Everett Sloane.


FERGUSON: Ferguson--


HOST: --was Hester Sondergaard.


EMILIO: Emilio, the barman--


HOST: --was Joe DeSantis.


MANERA: Manera--


HOST: --was Robert Dryden.


LIEUTENANT: The Swiss lieutenant--


HOST: --was played by Gregory Morton. Actively assisting were John Merlin, Miriam Wolfe, Glenn Anders, and Louis Quinn. Lieutenant Henry was played by your producer. Next week from Studio One, one of Hollywood's most individual performers, Mr. Robert Young, starring in a powerful story of tempest and torment in a small town, "King's Row" by Henry Bellamann. We hope that you'll be with us. Now, until next week -- till "King's Row" with Robert Young -- this is Fletcher Markle with a "good night" and "thank you" from all of us in Studio One.


SOUND: APPLAUSE, IN BG UNTIL END


MUSIC: THEME, IN BG UNTIL END


ANNOUNCER: This is Lee Vines and this is CBS, where ninety-nine million people gather every week, the Columbia Broadcasting System.




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