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18 Hours for Murder

The Fat Man

18 Hours for Murder

Oct 06 1950



CAST:

ANNOUNCER

2ND ANNOUNCER

SINGERS


THE FAT MAN

GUARD

MICHELETTI

TOMMY

LORA

FREDDY

MARILYN

ELLERBE

DUKE

OPERATOR

JUDGE




ANNCR: Here comes.. THE FAT MAN in "18 Hours for Murder" and starring J. Scott Smart - presented by the makers of CAMEL Cigarettes.


(MUSIC: . . ."HOW MILD" THEME)


ANNCR: How mild can a cigarette be?


2ND ANNCR: In a coast-to-coast test of hundreds of people who smoked only Camels for thirty days, noted throat specialists reported not one single case of throat irritation due to smoking Camels. 


ANNCR: Test Camels yourself, in your "T--Zone" -- T for throat, T for taste - and see why more people smoke Camels than any other cigarette!


(PAUSE) 


2ND ANNCR: There he goes....lighting up a Camel.. he's stepping on the scales.. 


(COIN IN SLOT)


ANNCR: Weight 234 pounds..


(CARD EXPELLED)


2ND ANNCR: Fortune - danger.


(MUSIC: . . STING AND OUT


ANNCR: Who is it? 


FAT: The Fat Man. 


(MUSIC: . . FAT MAN THEME ESTABLISH. . FADE DOWN AND UNDER)


FAT: We sure live in a wonderful age. Television. Supersonic Jet planes, wonder drugs that cure practically anything but jealousy and greed -- the two great causes of war and murder.


(MUSIC: . . UP AND SEGUE TO B.G.)


FAT: It was an anniversary, but not the kind you celebrate. I remembered the headlines in all the papers: "MUSICIAN SLAYS MODEL." And today one year later, as I rode the train to Ossining, the headline read: "GOVERNOR DENIES PLEA, JACK MICHELETTI TO DIE IN CHAIR TOMORROW." (PAUSE) I got to Sing Sing around noon, but by the time I went through all the preliminaries and followed the guard down to the cell in Death Row it was almost one o'clock.


(ECHO STEPS ON CONCRETE, STOP. KEY, DOOR CLANGS OPEN)


GUARD: You got ten minutes. 


FAT: Thanks.


(DOOR SHUTS AND GUARD'S STEPS RETREAT)


FAT: Hello, Micheletti.


MICHELETTI: I'll save you some time. 


FAT: Huh?


MICH: I'll have stewed prunes, eggs, bacon, toast and coffee. Hearty breakfast, just like all the others. Drop around about six A.M. to be sure you get a seat. 


FAT: I'm not a reporter, kid. I'm Brad Runyun. The warden phoned down this morning.. said you wanted to see me. 


MICH: Oh. Sorry, I thought you weren't coming. I... uh... I'm a little on edge. 


FAT: I can understand that. 


MICH: Sit down. 


FAT: Thanks.. What can I do for you?


MICH: What can anybody do for a guy with eighteen hours to live? However.. take a look at this letter.


FAT: Okay. 


MICH: Came day before yesterday.


FAT: (PAPER CRACKLE) (READS) "Jackie: I can't stand this any longer. I have decided to talk. Please have faith in me." No signature.


MICH: Yes, there was. This came with it. 


FAT: A pink scarf? That's a signature? 


MICH: If you read anything about my case you'd remember the Girl in the Pink Scarf. 


FAT: Oh yeah.


MICH: The papers had a lot of fun with it, and the D.A. called me a genius.. said I invented her on the witness stand. You follow the case, Runyun? 


FAT: Yeah, but it's been quite a while. I remember you were a musician with a band downtown, and it happened on a Monday night, musicians' night off..


MICH: Yeah. For a couple of months this blonde had been giving me the eye from the dance floor.


FAT: Carol Wainwright, wasn't it? 


MICH: The girl I killed.


FAT: Huh? 


MICH: Sure. I killed her. The law says I killed her, doesn't it? And the law's never wrong. (LONG PAUSE) Aw.. I'm sorry, I didn't call you up here to cry on your shoulder.


FAT: I know you didn't. So the Wainwright girl asked you up to her room for a drink, right?


MICH: Yeah. I don't know why I went. There was never anyone else but Lora, but..


FAT: Lora? 


MICH: My wife.. Uh.. correction: she was my wife until I got convicted. Anyway, I went up to Carol Wainwright's room at the Hotel Holloway, got there about eleven, an hour after she called me. I remember the door was open, so I walked in.


FAT: Yeah, right into trouble. 


MICH: You're not kidding - Well, I closed the door. The room was messed up a little. First thing I saw was a brown camel's hair overcoat lying on the bed.. a man's overcoat. Then I saw Carol. She was lying between the bed and the window. It looked like someone let her have it with something heavy. 


FAT: Then what?


MICH: Then comes the part the D.A. says I dreamed up on the stand.


FAT: The girl? 


MICH: Yeah, I heard someone behind me and turned. It was the girl in the pink scarf. She was coming at me with a bottle. 


FAT: What'd she look like?


MICH: That's the funny part. I don't know. I was looking right into the floor lamp and it kind of blinded me, but I saw the pink scarf and the bottle in her hand.


FAT: Yeah. 


MICH: I grabbed out and forced her to drop the bottle but she got to my face with her fingernails. A lot of scratches. The D.A. never let them forget those scratches, either.


FAT: Yeah, I remember that. 


MICH: Well, I... I don't know how it happened, but I lost my balance and stepped backward, right square on the bottle I'd taken away from her. I went down, my head hit the radiator and the lights went out. When I came to, the room was full of people. End of story. 


FAT: What about the overcoat?


MICH: Gone, along with the girl. Look.. you saw the papers. 


FAT: Yes, but that was some time ago, why do you send for me now? 


MICH: Bill got turned down this morning.


FAT: Bill? 


MICH: Bill Ellerbe, my lawyer. Since that note came day before yesterday I've been hoping. But Bill tells me in spite of the note, no new trial, no continuance, no stay, nothing. We're through.


FAT: Well, what do you want me to do? 


MICH: I want you to run this thing down. Ellerbe'll take care of your fee out of my insurance. Find out whoever wrote this if it takes you a year. If it is that girl, do something for me, will you?


FAT: What? 


MICH: Make her talk.. make her admit she killed Carol Wainwright and that I was her fall guy.. then write a full report on it, take it to my wife Lora.. and shove it down her throat.


(MUSIC: . . IN AND UNDER)


FAT: The guard was waiting outside the cell door, so I stuck the note and the scarf in my pocket and left Jackie Micheletti sitting on the edge of his cot in his shapeless gray prison uniform with his face in his hands.


(TWO PAIRS OF STEPS DOWN CORRIDOR, ECHO) 


GUARD: Think you can do anything for him?


FAT: What can you do for a guy in eighteen hours? 


GUARD: Yeah. (PAUSE) I've seen 'em come and go for a long time, now. I.. (CUTS OFF, DOESN'T KNOW WHAT TO SAY) 


FAT: (PAUSE) You what?


GUARD: I... I don't like this one at all.


FAT: You think he's innocent?


GUARD: (SNAPS) How should I know if he's innocent? I just don't like it, that's all. (PAUSE) You know.. the kid's got courage. He'd never break down that way if it wasn't for his wife.


FAT: Walked out on him after the conviction, huh? 


GUARD: Yeah. Three weeks. The only thing in the world that counted with him and she takes up with that no-good grifter three weeks after he goes up.


FAT: What no-good grifter? 


GUARD: Tommy Yale.


(MUSIC: . . IN AND UNDER) 


FAT: Tommy Yale --- that gave me something to think about during the train ride home. The letter Micheletti gave me didn't mean a thing. It was on a plain piece of white paper, the postmark told me nothing and the pink scarf was the kind you can buy in a thousand places in New York, but Tommy Yale meant something to me. If his batting average on blackmail, extortion and other forms of shakedown were published, he would be tops in any man's league, so I decided to have a talk with Tommy Yale.


(MUSIC: . . POINT AND UNDER)


(DOOR BUZZER. DOOR OPENED. LAUGHTER, ETC., UP ALONG WITH)


(MUSIC: . . PARTY TYPE PIANO, AD LIB, IN B. G.)


TOMMY: Yeah? What can I do for--?


FAT: Hello, Tommy.


TOMMY: Oh, Runyun. What's on your mind? 


FAT: Aren't you going to ask me in?


TOMMY: Sure.. sure, come on in, Runyun.


(DOOR CLOSED) 


TOMMY: Some of the gang dropped by and, first thing you know we had a party. You know how those things go. Honey? Oh, honey?


LORA: (SLIGHTLY OFF) Yes, dear? What do you - Oh! 


TOMMY: Honey, I want you to meet an old friend of mine.. Brad Runyun. This is Lora Micheletti.


BOTH: (AD LIB ACKNOWLEDGE) 


TOMMY: Sit down, I'll get you a drink.


FAT: No, never mind. I won't stay long.


LORA: (LAUGHS) Look at Freddy.


(MUSIC: . . PIANO PLAYS INTRO TO "MELANCHOLY BABY")


FREDDY: (OFF) No, No, No! Drop it down a coupla keys, George. 


FAT: What are they doing? Recording? 


LORA: Yes. Freddy just bought one of those new wire-recording outfits. They've been making like Al Jolson all afternoon.


(MUSIC: . . PIANO INTRO, LOWER KEY, THEN INTO ACCOMPANIMENT FOR)


FREDDY: (CLUMSY RENDITION OF "MELANCHOLY BABY", AS)


TOMMY: (DERISIVE LAUGH) What's on your mind, Runyun?


FAT: Jackie Micheletti. 


TOMMY: (PAUSE) You coulda picked a better time.


FAT: Maybe. 


TOMMY: Lora.. 


LORA: No.. don't mind me.. He's nothing to me now. 


FAT: Do we have to talk here?


TOMMY: Come on. No.. you stay here, honey. Be right back. 


(PAUSE, DOOR CLOSED, CUTTING B.G.)


TOMMY: Okay.. let's have it. 


FAT: You could've picked a better time for a party, Tommy.


TOMMY: What do you mean? 


FAT: I can think of a couple of better ways for Lora to observe Jackie's last day on earth.


TOMMY: So what? So a guy knocks off a dame and goes to the chair. Am I supposed to cry?


FAT: What if he didn't knock off the dame? 


TOMMY: Okay.. maybe he didn't. Maybe it's all an awful mistake. What am I supposed to do about that? 


FAT: (SHRUGS) Skip it, sweetheart. (PAUSE) Nice place you got here. Must set you back a nice piece of change. What are you doing for a living these days?


TOMMY: Oh, I pick up a nickel here and there. 


FAT: Like what here and what there?


TOMMY: Oh, the track. Some of my best friends are horses. 


FAT: Hm. What do you know about the murder of the Wainwright dame? 


TOMMY: (EASILY) Only what I read in the papers. What makes you think I know anything?


FAT: Oh just a guess. 


TOMMY: They don't pay off on guesses. 


FAT: Sometimes they do. This time I figure maybe a guy's in the death row who shouldn't be there.. so I snoop around. a little.. and right off run into the name of the greatest little shakedown artist in town.. running around with the convicted guy's wife.


TOMMY: So you guessed I had something to do with it?


FAT: Yeah. 


TOMMY: Well, stop guessing. And find something before you jump me. 


FAT: Well, how's this for a starter? Ever seen it?


TOMMY: Look, I.. (TAKE) 


FAT: (PAUSE) Ever seen it, Tommy?


TOMMY: (SHRUGS) A guy sees a lot of pink scarfs in a lifetime. 


FAT: This note came with it. Read it. 


TOMMY: (CRINKLE OF PAPER, READS) "Jackie: I can't stand this any longer. I have decided to talk.." Where'd you get this? 


FAT: Someone sent it to Micheletti at the prison.


TOMMY: (EASILY) Hmph. Well, like I said, Runyun, it's got nothing to do with me. I gotta go now.. and.. uh.. so have you. The door right there's the quickest.


FAT: Okay, Tommy. 


TOMMY: Sorry I couldn't tell you anything.


FAT: Oh, but you're wrong, sonny. You did tell me something.. something very important.


(MUSIC: . . IN AND UNDER)


FAT: Bill Ellerbe was a prosperous lawyer. You could see it in the birch panelling of his reception room, in the expensive antiques, and in a still more expensive-looking secretary who was definitely not an antique.


(A TYPEWRITER, STOPPING AS) 


MARILYN: Yes, sir?


FAT: I'd like to see Mr. Ellerbe, please. Name's Runyun.


MARILYN: Brad Runyun, the private detective? 


FAT: That's right. 


MARILYN: What do you want to see Mr. Ellerbe about?


FAT: Jackie Micheletti. 


MARILYN: Oh. (PAUSE) I'm very sorry, but Mr. Ellerbe isn't in.


FAT: You sure? 


MARILYN: Of course I'm sure.


FAT: Then who's talking on the phone in his office? 


MARILYN: What?


FAT: Don't look now, but the green light on your switchbox is showing. Uh.. stay right there, I'll just barge in.


MARILYN: (FADE OFF) Just a minute. Mr. Ellerbe told me to... 


(DOOR OPENED, CLOSED)


ELLERBE: (OFF) (ON PHONE NERVOUS) All right, all right..if that's the way it's got to be, I suppose I'll have to go along.


(HANGS UP) 


FAT: Hello, Ellerbe.


ELLERBE: (STARTLED) Who let .... ?


FAT: I'm Brad Runyun, private detective.


ELLERBE: (FADE IN) Oh? Well, what's on your mind? 


FAT: I talked to Micheletti this afternoon.


ELLERBE: What about? 


FAT: The note he got a couple days ago.. from the Girl in the Pink Scarf. 


ELLERBE: Oh yes. He told me all about it. What does he want you to do? 


FAT: Run it down.


ELLERBE: It's a little late for that. 


FAT: He doesn't care about himself. 


ELLERBE: Then why? 


FAT: His wife, Lora. He wants to prove to her he's innocent. 


ELLERBE: Oh. (SIGHS) I wish I could have proved it.


FAT: Do you think he's innocent? 


ELLERBE: I believe in the boy. If I didn't, I'd never've offered my services. I'm not getting a dime out of this, you know. 


FAT: No, I didn't know.


ELLERBE: I can tell you this, Runyun. That letter and the scarf are someone's perverted idea of a joke.


FAT: What makes you say that?


ELLERBE: The Girl in the Pink Scarf was the greatest thing to hit the papers since the Pig Woman.. and it had the usual aftermath. Dozens of women called us, wrote the papers, even walked into headquarters and swore they were the Girl in the Pink Scarf. Publicity does that to some kind of people. 


FAT: Yeah I know.


ELLERBE: Okay.. there's only one thing can save Jackie right now. We're through.. unless I can get a State Supreme Court Justice to sign an order for a new trial during the next 14 hours...and to do that I've got to have a big hunk of new evidence. Judge Randall's out of town, be back around eleven tonight and I've got an appointment to see him. I don't think it'll do much good, though.


FAT: You ought to get a stay on general principles. There's a shakedown in this somewhere. 


ELLERBE: Shakedown? Why?


FAT: If Tommy Yale's within a mile of it you can bet there's a shakedown.


ELLERBE: Oh? (PAUSE) Who's Tommy Yale? 


FAT: You mean, you don't know Tommy?


ELLERBE: (AWKWARD PAUSE) I'm afraid I haven't heard of him.


FAT: (SHRUGS) Oh, he's the guy who's running around with Micheletti's wife. Well, I better get rolling. If anything turns up tonight I'll call you.


ELLERBE: Good. I'll be at Judge Randall's at eleven.


FAT: I may see you there. (OPEN DOOR) So long, Ellerbe.


(DOOR OPENED, CLOSED)


(MUSIC: . . IN AND UNDER)


FAT: The secretary had gone for the day. As I stopped by her desk, wondering why Ellerbe had told me he'd never heard of Tommy Yale.. I saw a scratch pad.. had three words scribbled on it in pencil: "Call Tommy Yale". At this point, the little green light on the switchbox went on. I moved the switch down, picked up the telephone and carefully covered the mouthpiece and listened.


(TWO BUZZES ON FILTER, RECEIVER UP)


DUKE: (FILTER) Yeah? 


ELLERBE: (FILTER) Duke - this is Ellerbe.


DUKE: Go ahead. 


ELLERBE: It happened.


DUKE: Yale? 


ELLERBE: Yeah, There's a private dick in it now. You've got to get to Yale, understand? Tonight.


DUKE: Where'll it be? 


ELLERBE: "The Cedars" on Highway One. He'll be there in half an hour. 


DUKE: Right.


(HANGS UP)


(MUSIC: . . IN AND UNDER)


FAT: That was a stopper if I ever heard one.. but Ellerbe's office was no place to think it over. I got out of there, hailed a cab and we fought Manhattan traffic across the Bridge and onto Highway One, on our way to the Cedars.


(MUSIC: . . FIRST ACT CURTAIN. . MUSIC OUT)


FAT: Yes, time was short for our man Micheletti. And when you're faced with that kind of shortage, you've got to make your decisions fast. When you've got time, though, you can examine evidence more thoroughly. And when you're deciding on a brand of cigarettes, you must take your time. Don't make snap judgments. And then you'll really find out what cigarette suits you best. Now, Hugh Conover, carry on...


ANNCR: You can't judge how mild or how enjoyable a cigarette is by just one sniff or one puff. It takes day-in, day-out smoking. Make the sensible cigarette test: Smoke Camels for thirty days and let your "T-Zone"--T for throat and T for taste - be the judge.


2nd ANNCR: Your taste will tell you about the rich, full flavor of Camel's costly tobaccos. Your throat will tell you just how mild Camels are.


1st ANNCR: In a coast-to-coast test, hundreds of people smoked only Camels for thirty days. Each week, noted throat specialists examined the throats of these smokers and reported not one single case of throat irritation due to smoking Camels.


2nd ANNCR: Make your own thirty day Camel test - the sensible test - and see why more people smoke Camels than any other cigarette.


SINGERS: How mild, 

How mild,

How mild can a cigarette be? 

Make the Camel thirty-day test and you'll see!

Smoke Camels and see!


1st ANNCR: And now here again, is the Fat Man.


(MUSIC: . . SECOND OVERTURE. . . . . . . . .)


FAT: The country north of the Bronx was Lost Atlantis to the taxi driver, but somehow we found The Cedars, a dine-and-dance joint a few miles out on Highway One. I left the driver in the cab and went in. There was a vacant dance floor, surrounded by empty booths....a juke box, a bartender, and one customer: a lonesome-looking girl sitting on the end stool. It was Lora Micheletti.


(STEPS, ACROSS FLOOR TO STOP AND JUKE BOX)


FAT: Hello, Laura. Where's your boyfriend?


LORA: (TENSE) Look...do me a big favor...Go away.


FAT: Wait a minute now... 


LORA: It's important. Please. 


FAT: What's the matter? 


LORA: I can't tell you now. 


FAT: Where is Tommy? 


LORA: (PAUSE) Outside. (LOW, FAST) Listen! I've been waiting ten months for this. You almost ruined it, back at the apartment. He thought I called you in. Don't...(PAUSE, GASPS)


(DOOR OPENS, STAGGERING STEPS IN)


LORA: Tommy! What happened?


TOMMY: Beat me up - he - oh - Lora - Lora.


FAT: He's hurt real bad. 


LORA: (INTENSELY) Tommy...listen, now. I know you're hurt but you've got to tell me! Who is she? Tell me, Tommy, tell me!


TOMMY: Already told.... talk... made me talk...Duke.


LORA: Think, Tommy! Who is the girl in the pink scarf? I've got to find her. (SOBS FRANTICALLY) Tommy! There's no time left... Who is she? Tell me! (SHRIEKS) Tell me!


TOMMY: So...so that's why, huh? So tha's why you....aaaahhhh. 


(COLLAPSES, BODY FALL)


LORA: Tommy....Tommy


FAT: (PAUSE) No use, sweetheart...he's dead.


LORA: (SOBS) No...no.


FAT: Come on, now...pull yourself together. 


LORA: (HYSTERICAL) I can't....I can't....


FAT: Lora, snap out of it. (SHAKES HER) 


LORA: (AS HE SHAKES) No...let go...let me...


(HE SLAPS HER SOUNDLY) 


FAT: (AS SHE RECOVERS) I hated to do that, baby, but every minute counts now. When did you find out Tommy was shaking someone down? 


LORA: (GETTING CONTROL) R-right after the conviction. He came to me, said he'd get Jack off for $100,000.


FAT: Why didn't you report it to the police?


LORA: He said if I did he'd get rid of the evidence. I didn't know what to do. He'd keep calling me night after night. Finally I realized he..he was in love with me.


FAT: So you strung him along.


LORA: For ten months...turned my back on Jackie for that filthy, crooked little rat. I thought I had him tonight. He was going to collect again...and this was the big one, he said. Tonight, for the first time, he took me along.


FAT: What happened after you got here?


LORA: He went out about ten minutes ago, said he'd be right back. That's all I know.


FAT: Okay..come on. I want to have a look at his apartment.


LORA: We've got to stay here until... 


FAT: The bartender's in the phone booth calling the cops right now. We can't stand on formalities, baby...there are less than eleven hours to go.


(MUSIC: . . IN AND UNDER. . . . .)


FAT: And two more hours were gone by the time we finished tossing Tommy Yale's apartment. Results, nil. Like all successful blackmailers, he knew better than to keep anything important in the house. The debris from the party, including the wire recorder, was still there.


LORA: You think it was all a bluff? 


FAT: Nope. Yale knew better than to bluff. Pink Scarf has the evidence, but she knew right off that shaking down a lawyer like Ellerbe is no task for an amateur, so she pulled Tommy in. 


LORA: Ellerbe? You mean..he killed the girl in... 


FAT: All I know is, he's in it up to his ears. Why do you think he volunteered to defend Jack? Out of the kindness of his heart?


LORA: He...wanted Jack convicted? 


FAT: Sure..and he did a great job. Tried hard, but not quite hard enough. So he gets a big pat on the back as a Defender of the Weak...and Jack goes to the chair.


LORA: (SHUDDERS) Ohhhhh. 


FAT: ...This isn't getting us anywhere. What did Tommy do after I left this afternoon? 


LORA: Tried to got someone on the phone. 


FAT: Who? 


LORA: I don't know. But I remember the phone was lying on the table here, next to where Freddy was singing into the wire recorder, and... 


FAT: Wait a minute...


LORA: I know what you're thinking, but it's no good. Tommy didn't get his number. He must have gotten it later tho, because when everybody was gone he told me about that big collection he was going to make. What are you doing with that recorder?


(FAT FIDDLING WITH WIRE RECORDER) 


FAT: Hmm....


(WHIRR) 


FAT: Ahh...here we go.


TECH: (FOLLOWING RECORDED)


(MUSIC: . . .PIANO ON "MELANCHOLY BABY". . ..FOR. .. ..)


FREDDY: (SINGS) "... cloud must have a silver lining,

Wait until the sun shines through, 

Smile, my honey, dear...(PICK UP PHONE)

Hey Tommy


OVER RECORD

LORA: What good...

FAT: Quiet!

LORA: But I...

FAT: Quiet, I said.


(MUSIC: . . .PIANO STOPS. . . . .)


FAT: I want to hear this phone business.


TOMMY: (HARD) Shut up - I got to make a phone call.


(DIALS PL 6-5329 (SEVEN TIMES IN CLEAR)

(END OF RECORDED SPOT) 

(CLICK, CUTS OFF)


FAT: I think we may have something. 


LORA: What? 


FAT: That dialing! He was dialing Pink Scarf! I'd just shown him the note saying she was going to talk. The first thing he'd do would be to try to talk her out of it, but he couldn't get hold of her. The call he did put through was to Ellerbe for one more touch.


(FIDDLES WITH RECORDER)


LORA: But how can you tell what the number was?


FAT: I'm going to slow the wire down. Count the clicks and write 'em down. Ready?


LORA: (PUZZLED) All right. 


TECH: (START RECORD AT 33 SPEED AT)


TOMMY: Shut up - I've got to make a phone call.


FAT: The clicks come right after this.


(ZIP OF DIAL, FOLLOWED BY CLEARLY DEFINED CLICKS 7 TIMES)


FAT: Did you get them?


LORA: Yes, I've got 7, 5, 6, 5, 3, 2, 9.


FAT: Good. Now let's see, 7 is P... 5 is L...


LORA: Yes.


FAT: That's Plaza 6-5329. Where's the phone? Oh!!


(DIALS "0")


OPERATOR: (FILTER) Operator.


FAT: Operator...This is Brad Runyun, licensed detective - I want the address of this number: Plaza 6-5329.


(MUSIC: ...IN AND UNDER. . . . . )


FAT: I got the address; an apartment in Midtown. When we got there I left Lora in an all night coffee joint next door and went up alone. Nobody was home, so I pass-keyed my way in. I was reaching for the light switch next to the door when I heard steps in the hall.


(KEY IN LOCK, DOOR FLUNG OPEN, GIRL PUSHED INTO ROOM)


DUKE: Okay, let's not waste any more time. 


MARILYN: I...I haven't got it, Duke, believe me... 


DUKE: I'm tired of playin' twenny questions, baby. Let's have it right now or you won't make the train tonight..or maybe ever. All right, where's the light switch?


MARILYN: Here! 


(CLICK)


DUKE: Now...get going, before I..(GASPS AS) 


(SHORT SCUFFLE, FAT SLUGS HIM AND HE FALLS TO FLOOR) 


FAT: Stay right where you are, sweetheart. I.....well!


MARILYN: Hello, Runyun.


FAT: Ellerbe's secretary. Where's the pink scarf?


MARILYN: You know where it is. I sent it to Jackie Micheletti. 


FAT: So that's why you had to use Tommy Yale for a go-between. Putting the bite on your own boss. (TONGUE IN CHEEK) You know something, sweetheart...you're liable to get canned for this.


MARILYN: Okay let's get it over with..I know what you've come for.


FAT: Where is it?


MARILYN: You'll have to take the mattress apart to get it.


FAT: Bill Ellerbe's overcoat?


MARILYN: Yeah...with a letter from Carol Wainwright in the pocket. She was was walking out on him. Ellerbe went up that night to talk her out of it... I..I was in love with him then.


FAT: And you just happened to pass by? 


MARILYN: I followed him...saw it happen. 


FAT: So you decided to blackmail him?


MARILYN: Yes - he threw me over and I was going to make him pay for it. I saw the overcoat on the bed...thought he might've left his hat somewhere. While I was looking for it, Micheletti came in. (BREAKS DOWN) I...I don't know why I did it.


FAT: Pretty greedy I'd say. Didn't you stop to think of Micheletti?


MARILYN: I know..I don't deserve to live!


FAT: You're so right, sweetheart.


(MUSIC: IN AND UNDER. . . . . ..


FAT: I parked Duke and the girl with the cop on the beat and took off for Judge Randall's apartment on the East Side... got there promptly at eleven. Ellerbe was a little early. When the maid let me into the library, he was going into the last performance of his year-long run.


ELLERBE: (FADE IN) ...I know, I know, Your Honor. I'm simply making a final plea for my client...to ask you for the last time to reconsider. 


JUDGE: But, Ellerbe, there's no evidence, nothing to base this...


ELLERBE: At the moment there is no new evidence, but we have every hope of...of...(CUTS OFF) Oh?


FAT: (PAUSE) Don't let me interrupt, Ellerbe. 


ELLERBE: What are you doing here? 


FAT: Waiting until you finish, because when you do, I'll be happy to show Judge Randall the new evidence.


ELLERBE: What are you...(SEES COAT) What have you got there?


FAT: A coat...with a letter in the pocket. 


JUDGE: (PAUSE) Is this....significant, Ellerbe?


ELLERBE: (SWEATS) I...uh....I think it is. (PAUSE) Runyun? Who was the girl?


FAT: Your secretary. 


ELLERBE: No. No! My secretary - that's great. (PAUSE, LIGHT CHUCKLE, GROWING INTO FRENZIED LAUGH)


JUDGE: What is this, Ellerbe?


ELLERBE: (THE LAUGH TAPERS, DIES) It's very simple, your Honor. I volunteered to serve as Micheletti's counsel because I wanted to see him convicted. (PAUSE) I killed Carol Wainwright. 


JUDGE: Are you crazy?


FAT: No, he's not, Judge, it's true -- Here I'll get you the warden on the telephone.


(MUSIC:. . . CURTAIN AND FADE. . . . . .)


ANNCR: (OVER MUSIC) The Fat Man will return in just a moment. 


(MUSIC:. . ..OUT. . . . .)


1ST ANNCR: What cigarette do you smoke, Doctor?


2ND ANNCR: That question was asked of one hundred thirteen thousand, five hundred and ninety-seven doctors in every branch of medicine. 


1ST ANNCR: What cigarette do you smoke, Doctor?


2ND ANNCR: The brand named most was Camel! Yes, according to this nationwide survey, more doctors smoke Camels than any other cigarette!


1ST ANNCR: Friends, among the millions of Camel smokers, you'll also find many leaders in sports. Take the two pitchers in the remarkable first World Series game - Vic Raschi and Jim Konstanty are Camel smokers and so are many other stars of the series. Try Camels yourself and see just how mild a cigarette can be.


SINGERS: How mild, 

How mild,

How mild can a cigarette be? 

Make the Camel thirty-day test and you'll see!

Smoke Camels and see! (OUT)


1ST ANNCR: (BEAT) Now here's the Fat Man with a special message.


(MUSIC: . . .STING AND OUT. . . . . .)


FAT: No one deserves the appreciation of the American people more than the men and women who have served in our [Armed] Forces. The Camel people send weekly gifts of cigarettes to those servicemen and veterans who are hospitalized.


ANNCR: This week's Camels go to: Veteran's Hospitals, Marion, Indiana and Minneapolis, Minnesota...U.S. Army Walter Reed General Hospital, Washington, D.C..... U.S. Naval Hospital, Portsmouth, New Hampshire. 


(MUSIC: . . .FAT MAN THEME - FADE UNDER . . . .(CUSHION)


1ST ANNCR: Tonight's program starred J. Scott Smart as the Fat Man and was directed by 


(MUSIC: . . . .OUT. . .)


1ST ANNCR: Clark Andrews. The music was conducted by Bernard Green.


(MUSIC:. . . . CAMEL THEME. . .(CUSHION) . .THEME FADE AND OUT. . . .)


ANNCR: (IN BOOTH) Men, the first time you light up a pipeful of Prince Albert the delightful natural tobacco fragrance will tell you why P.A. is America's largest-selling smoking tobacco! The rich, flavorful tobacco is specially treated to insure against tongue bite and it's crimp cut to smoke cool and even. Get Prince Albert-- 


(MUSIC: . . ..SNEAKS. . . ..)


ANNCR: It's the National Joy Smoke! 


(MUSIC: CAMEL THEME CONTINUING UNDER. . . . ..)


ANNCR: Listen next week when Camel Cigarettes again present that fascinating and exciting character The Fat Man, in the adventure called "Murder Calls Again."


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