Dental Procedure - FAQ's..


MGDM HOSPITAL, DEVAGIRI P.O., KANGAZHA, KOTTAYAM-686555.


DENTAL FAQHOMEDENTAL FAQ2

Dental Procedures

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1* Root Canal Therapy
2* Sealants
3* Dental Implants
4* Fillings

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5* Dentures
6* Wisdom Teeth Extraction
7* Bleaching

8* Orthodontics / Braces
9* Bridges

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10* Dental care in pregnancy

 

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5. Dentures

What are dentures?

Dentures replace missing teeth and their adjacent tissues with a removable dental appliance made of acrylic resin and, in some cases, a combination of metals.

What are the different types of dentures?

There are four primary types of dentures:
* complete
This type of denture replaces all of the teeth and their adjacent tissues.
* partial
Partial dentures act as dental bridges as they "bridge" the gap between a missing tooth or teeth.
* conventional
Conventional dentures allow a recovery time (usually 4 to 8 weeks) after all of the teeth are extracted before the dentures are placed in the mouth.
* immediate
This type of denture does not allow a healing period after all of the teeth are removed. The denture is immediately fit into the mouth after all teeth are removed. Additional adjustments in the fitting of this type of denture procedure may be necessary as healing occurs.

Oral health care and dentures:

* Daily remove and brush the denture carefully with a brush and toothpaste, both specifically designed for denture cleaning.
* Avoid the use of harsh abrasive cleaners on your denture.
* Avoid cleaning and/or sterilizing your denture in boiling water, or damage to the denture is likely to occur.
* If a partial denture is in place, remove it before brushing the natural teeth.
* Once removed, keep the denture in a safe place, out of the reach of children.
* Once removed, soak the denture in a proper cleansing solution or water.
* Have your teeth cleaned every 6 months by an oral health professional.

6. Wisdom Teeth Extraction

What are wisdom teeth?

Also called third molars, wisdom teeth usually make their first appearance in young adults between the ages of 15 to 25. Because most mouths are too small for these four additional molars, an extraction procedure, sometimes immediately after they surface, is often necessary.

When should wisdom teeth be removed?

The following symptoms may indicate that the wisdom teeth have erupted and surfaced, and should be removed before they become impacted -- meaning, the teeth have surfaced and have no room in the mouth to grow. However, each individual may experience symptoms differently. Symptoms may include:
* pain
* infection in the mouth
* facial swelling
* swelling of the gumline in the back of the mouth
Most oral health specialists will recommend an immediate removal of the wisdom teeth, as early removal will help to eliminate problems, such as an impacted tooth that destroys the second molar. According to the American Academy of General Dentistry, third molar impaction is the most prevalent medical developmental disorder.

What problems are often associated with impacted third molars?

* bacteria and plaque build-up
* cysts development (a fluid-filled sac)
* tumor development
* infection
* jaw and gum disease

What is involved in the extraction procedure?

Wisdom tooth extraction surgery involves removing the gum tissue that presides over the tooth, gently detaching the connective tissue between the tooth and the bone, removing the tooth, and suturing the opening in the gumline.

7. Bleaching

Teeth bleaching to whiten teeth:

There are many products currently on the market that promise whiter, brighter teeth, many times overnight. But, dental professionals, and the American Dental Association, issue a word of caution about the improper use of such over-the-counter products, as they are often too abrasive and can damage the teeth with extended use. Most will contend that there is nothing harmful about many teeth bleaching procedures, as long as they are dentist-supervised. In most supervised cases, teeth bleaching can effectively whiten and brighten the color of teeth for up to five years, without softening or weakening the teeth and gum line.

Who may benefit from teeth bleaching?

Most beneficial
* age spots
* yellow or orange spotting on teeth caused by coffees, teas, berries and other foods, or smoking
Moderately beneficial
* gray or brown stains caused by fluorosis (excessive intake of fluoridated water)
* gray stains caused by smoking and/or the use of certain medications
Not recommended
* overly-sensitive teeth
* persons with a gum or mouth disease (periodontal disease or oral cancer)
* persons with worn tooth enamel

What are some different teeth-whitening methods?

The dentist will use either an in-office bleaching system or laser bleaching while you are in the dental chair. Most patients, however, choose dentist-supervised at-home bleaching, which is more economical and, in most cases, provides the same results.
At-home bleaching involves using a custom-made mouthguard that can be worn comfortably while you are awake or sleeping. The mouthguard is so thin that you should even be able to talk and work while wearing it. Some bleaching systems recommend bleaching your teeth from two to four hours a day -- these usually take 3 to 6 weeks to complete and work best on patients with sensitive teeth. Other systems recommend bleaching your teeth at night, while you sleep, which may only take 10 to 14 days to complete.

8. Orthodontis & Braces

What is orthodontics?

Orthodontics is the dental specialty that focuses on the development, prevention, and correction of irregularities of the teeth, bite, and jaws. Orthodontists also have specialized training in facial abnormalities and disorders of the jaw. A patient may consult an orthodontist after receiving a referral from his/her general dentist -- recommending orthodontic treatment to improve the patient's physical "orofacial" appearance. However, the American Dental Association recommends that every child receive an orthodontic evaluation by the age of seven.

Why choose orthodontic treatment?

Any orthodontic problem may be classified as a malocclusion, or "bad bite." The following problems may be helped or minimized with proper orthodontic treatment:
* misaligned, crooked, or crowed teeth
* missing teeth
* extra teeth
* an overbite
* an underbite
* misaligned or incorrect jaw position
* a disorder of the jaw joint

At what age do braces become appropriate?

Moving and correcting the alignment of the teeth follows the same biological and physical process no matter what the age. However, an adult mouth must overcome already-positioned facial bones and jaw structure. Thus, overcoming most types of malocclusions may require more than one type of orthodontic treatment for adults. In most cases, the ideal age for braces, and other orthodontic treatments, is between 10 and 14 years of age, although, persons of any age can benefit from treatment.

What are the different types of braces available?

Braces, also called fixed orthodontic appliances, generally come in three varieties:
* brackets, metal or plastic, clear or tooth-colored, that are bonded to teeth
* lingual-type brackets that attach to the back of teeth, hidden from view
* bands that cover most of the teeth with metal bands that wrap around the teeth
All three types use wires to move the teeth to the desired position.

Oral health care and braces:

The following recommendations will help to eliminate, or reduce, any oral health problems while your teeth are in braces:
* Brush your teeth carefully after every meal with fluoride toothpaste and a soft-bristled toothbrush, as food becomes easily lodged in the braces.
* Floss daily between the teeth and the braces.
* Maintain every 6 month cleanings by an oral health professional.
* Limit your sugar and starch intake, as debris left behind from these types of foods may turn into damaging acids, which, in addition to promoting plaque formation, may also be harmful to teeth and gums.
* Avoid hard and/or sticky snacks that may be difficult to remove from the orthodontic equipment in your mouth. This includes foods such as popcorn, hard or chew candy, caramel, and/or nuts.

9. Bridges

What is a dental bridge?

A dental bridge is an appliance used to replace one or more missing teeth. These appliances are cemented into place and cannot be removed by the patient.

How is a dental bridge constructed?

As the name of this appliance implies, the bridge is made out of three pieces that fit into the open space in the mouth, "bridging" the gap. Most bridges are made of a pontic tooth (or false tooth), held together by two crowns (a "cap" that covers the tooth, approximating its normal size and shape). This trio is then attached (cemented) to the abutment teeth (the surrounding teeth of each side of the gap).

Who is a candidate for bridges?

Nearly everyone who has one or more missing teeth is a candidate for a dental bridge. However, the difference between proper and improper oral hygiene is, generally, what determines the success of the dental bridge.
What are the different types of dental bridges?
There are several different types of dental bridges. Your dentist or oral health specialist will recommend the most appropriate one for your mouth condition and the location of the missing tooth or teeth.
* traditional bridge - a pontic tooth (or false tooth) is held together by two crowns (a "cap" that covers the tooth, approximating its normal size and shape). This trio is then attached (cemented) to the abutment teeth (the surrounding teeth of each side of the gap).
* resin bonded bridge (also known as a "Maryland" bridge) - this type of bridge involves the pontic (false) teeth being fused together to metal bands, bonded to the back of the abutment teeth with a resin cement. This type of procedure is common when the teeth missing are in the front of the mouth.
* cantilever bridge - this type of procedure is most appropriate when there is only one abutment tooth on either side of the span.

Oral health care and bridges:

The following recommendations will help to eliminate, or reduce, any oral health problems while your teeth bonded by a bridge:
* Brush your teeth carefully after every meal with fluoride toothpaste and a soft-bristled toothbrush, as food may become lodged causing the gums and teeth to become infected. This may lead to further complications resulting in the loss of the bridge.
* Floss daily. Your dentist, or other oral health specialist, may recommend using a floss threaded for hard-to-reach places between the bridge and its adjacent teeth.
* Have your teeth cleaned every 6 months by an oral health professional.
* Limit your sugar and starch intake, as debris left behind from these types of foods may turn into damaging acids, which, in addition to promoting plaque formation, may also be harmful to teeth and gums.
* Avoid hard and/or sticky snacks. This includes foods such as popcorn, hard or chew candy, caramel, and/or nuts.
Most bridges last 8 to 10 years with proper oral hygiene.

Note: this is for information purpose only!!!!!!!

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