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Where are they now?

Christopher Rice
Kylie Couch
Brittany Daws
Garrett McKay
Thomas Cullen
Delora K. Gaskins
Delora is a MARSI award recipient and is double-majoring in Mathematics and Chemistry. She intends to pursue a Ph. D. after graduating from CSULB. Her project involves determining the rate constants for the aqueous thiocynate and hydroxyl radical reactions for a range of temperatures. This is important because thiocynate is used in competition kinetics, a standard method that used in the Mezyk lab. Delora is now pursuing a Ph.D.

Kimberly Johnston
Kimberly was a Biology-Physiology major and Chemistry minor at CSULB. She joined the lab in April 2009. She studied the kinetics and decomposition of various anticancer drugs that utilize radioactive heavy metals as its core element. After graduating she will be attending medical school and studying to enter the surgical field.


Devin F.R. Doud
Devin was the CSULB 2009 Outstanding Graduate from the College of Natural Science and Mathematics, an Arnold and Mabel Beckman Scholar (2008-2009), a Phi Beta Kappa Honor Society Inductee (2008), and a Phi Kappa Phi Honor Society Inductee (2008). Devin graduated summa cum laude in B.S. in Biochemistry in Spring 2009. While at CSULB, Devin worked on understanding the radical chemistry involved in the oxidation and reduction of hydroxylamines to form nitrosamines and hydrazines in water. These hydroxylamines are believed to be intermediates in the conversion of non-toxic amines to carcinogenic species. Devin also investigated a correlation between the physiochemical properties of wastewater and their measured radical kinetics. This information was used to generate a model that could quantitatively predict the kinetics based upon six physiochemical properties easily measured from the water. Devin has now completed this Ph.D. in Microbiology at Cornell University, Ithaca, New York.

Edsel M. Abud
Edsel was a MARC Scholar, Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) Scholar and a Leadership Alliance Fellow at Johns Hopkins University, School of Medicine. He double-majored in Biochemistry and Chemistry and matriculated into the MD/PhD program at the University of California, Irvine.  He first joined the Mezyk lab in spring 2007 studying the kinetics of reactions between several biologically active, and often carcinogenic, nitrosamine compounds (characterized by a >NN=O group) with water-derived, oxidizing and reducing free radicals (such as hydroxyl radicals, OH, and hydrated electrons, e-aq). The second project involves the large-scale removal of large amount amounts of estrogenic steroids out of water using Advanced Oxidative and Reductive processes (AO/RPs).To remove the steroids out of water with these techniques, a clear understanding of the chemistry between the radicals and steroids must be well understood and characterized.

Timothy J. Feliciano
Tim was an Arnold and Mabel Beckman Scholar, Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) Scholar and a Leadership Alliance Fellow at Harvard University. He graduated with a double major in Biochemistry and Philosophy and after several years of work, matriculated into the MD/PhD program at Northwestern University. He first joined the Mezyk lab in spring 2007. Tim is currently involved in two projects. The first involves studying the radical degradation kinetics of general anesthetics in water as a means of investigating their toxicity. The chemistry of oxidizing free radical species are thought to play a critical role in the formation of toxic intermediates of these compounds. The second project involves studying degradation efficiencies of advanced oxidative and reductive processes (AO/RP's) applied to sulfonamide metabolites in waste water. Kinetics will be studied via electron pulse radiolysis and degradation products produced by cobalt-60 gamma irradiation and analyzed using HPLC. 

Michelle Dail
Michelle graduated cum laude from CSULB in Spring 2009 with a BS in Biology, option in Molecular Cellular Biology, minor in Chemistry, and a certificate in Biotechnology. In her two years in the RadKEM group, Michelle worked on several different research projects, notably the hydroxyl radical oxidation and hydrated electron reduction of beta-lactam antibiotics in waters intended for reuse.  After working at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland as a post-baccalaureate IRTA fellow in the lab of Dr. Forbes Porter for two years Michelle entered the MD/PhD program at the University of Pittsburgh in fall 2011.





Katy L. Swancutt  
Katy was an Arnold and Mabel Beckman Scholar (2007), a Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) Scholar and graduated with honors with a BS in Biology, with an option in Zoology as well as a minor in Chemistry. Katy started working in the RadKEM group early in 2004.  Over her four years in this group she was able to work on quite a few different projects, including small parts of "the group nitrosamine project," a large project on establishing a toxicity pathway for cisplatin and related platinum-based anti-cancer chemotherapeutics, various projects concerned with removing trace contaminants (methylisothiocyanate, caffeine, steroids, etc.) from waters intended for reuse, and finally several projects investigating the radiolytic degradation of chelating ligands used in the extraction of specific lanthanide and actinide series nuclear fission products. Katy has completed her PhD in Vetinerary Science, and is finishing her combined D.V.M program at University of Colorado, Boulder.
Thomas Neubauer 
Tommy began undergraduate research in the Mezyk lab in 2005. Tommy graduated with a B.S. followed by a MS in Chemistry before entering his PhD at the University of California, Riverside in 2010.  While at CSULB Tommy studied the kinetics and efficiency of removing sulfa-based antibiotics, and their residues, from both drinking and waste waters.The achievement of quantitative removal of these drugs at large commercial scale, the use of free radicals (hydroxyl radical and hydrated electron) generated in-situ/ by Advanced Oxidation Processes, was the theme of his thesis. 




 
Kimberly Rickman
Kim was an Outstanding Graduate of  the College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics in 2011, an Arnold and Beckman Scholar, She first joined the Mezyk lab in spring 2007 studying the kinetics of reactions between several biologically active, and often carcinogenic, nitrosamine compounds (characterized by a >NN=O group) with water-derived, oxidizing and reducing free radicals (such as hydroxyl radicals, OH, and hydrated electrons, e-aq). The second project involves the large-scale removal of large amount amounts of estrogenic steroids out of water using Advanced Oxidative and Reductive processes (AO/RPs).To remove the steroids out of water with these techniques, a clear understanding of the chemistry between the radicals and steroids must be well understood and characterized.


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