Newsletter

Please go to the Upcoming Events and Programs" for info on our next meetings.
 
September Newsletter:

IN THIS ISSUE

 

Important Dates for the coming year

Birthdays and Surgeversaries

Topic: The difference between Arrhythmia and Fibrillation

Recipe of the Month

Get Well Wishes

Lectures and Notices

Mended Little Hearts of Long Island

 

September Dates

 

September 5th -   Labor Day

September 18th – Mended Hearts Meeting 1:00pm

September 25thAmerican Heart Association

                                 Long Island  Heart Walk  at Jones Beach

 
 

Summer of 2011

We hope everyone had a wonderful fun filled summer this year.  Mended Hearts of Suffolk started out the summer with our first fundraiser - a ball game with the Long Island Ducks.  Although the loudspeakers were a bit LOUD, the first game was quite enjoyable – and a WIN!  We were treated to a double header since the Friday game was a Rain Out.  Those who stayed saw the Ducks fall in the second game.  Thank you to all who bought tickets and contributed to our fundraiser. Hopefully we will do the same next summer. I have already been contacted by the Ducks.

We are extremely proud to announce that this coming year will be the 40th Anniversary of

 Mended Hearts of Suffolk County, Chapter # 67.

We plan on having a huge celebration this coming Spring with Raffles, Speakers and a Journal to celebrate this important milestone.  Keep a lookout for upcoming information. To be discussed at our Sept. meeting.

 

September’s Speaker

Dr. Smadar Kort, cardiologist from Stony Brook who will talk about the Valve Center at SB Hospital Heart Center on Sunday, Sept 18th at 1pm

 

Speaker Topics:

Over the next few months we will have guest speakers talking about the following topics:

Guest speakers-for October  TBD

Nutrition-with Suzanne Smookler – for November

 

September’s Birthdays

Hope you all enjoy your  Birthdays!

 

John F- 9/7   Lorraine P – 9/8   Kimberly S – 9/15

Walter S – 9/16   Graham P – 9/22   Pegge B – 9/25

 

September Surgeversaries

We don’t have any record of any Surgeversaries for any of our members for Sept, so if we are missing any dates. please give those updates to John Dirr

        

Visitation Report:

Joe Edrehi, Joel Wohlegemuth ,Bob Barrett,

 Lew Chipp & Mel Baruch continued to make visits over the summer to heart surgery patients.

 

Thank you for your hard work and effort bringing comfort to these patients.

 

  Get Well Wishes

Happy to hear Alysa Esposito has successfully come thru her second brain surgery in August!

Can’t wait to see you!

 Condolences to Eileen Edrehi’s family- her brother passed away in mid-August.

___________________________________________________

 

THIS MONTHS RECIPES:

 Saucy Chopped Steak

 Total time 30 min,  prep 10 min, servings 4 servings

 

1 lb. ground sirloin

1/2 tsp.  pepper

1 Tbsp. butter, divided

1 pkg.  (8 oz.) sliced fresh mushrooms or shallots

1/2 cup chopped onions

1 Tbsp.  Worcestershire sauce

1/2 cup PHILADELPHIA Original Cooking Creme

2 Tbsp.  chopped Italian parsley

MIX meat and pepper; shape into 4 (1/2-inch-thick) oval patties. Melt 1 tsp. butter in large skillet on medium heat. Add patties; cook 5 min. on each side or until done (160ºF). Transfer to platter; cover to keep warm.

MELT remaining butter in same skillet. Add mushrooms and onions; cook and stir 3 min. Stir in Worcestershire sauce; cook and stir 2 min or until onions are crisp-tender.

ADD cooking creme; cook 2 to 3 min. or until heated through, stirring frequently. Spoon over patties; top with parsley.

Calories: 300 Total fat :19 g  Saturated fat : 9 g

Cholesterol : 95 mg   Sodium  370 mg Carbohydrate7 g   Sugars : 4 g   Protein :24 g  Calcium  6 %DV  Iron 15 %DV

 

Obviously to have a Healthier meal cut out the cooking cream and use Lite Worcestershire sauce, which will lower the Fat and Sodium.

 

How to Lose a Pound:

 

To lose 1 pound per week you need to cut 3,500 calories from what you usually eat during the week

 This means eating 500 fewer calories per day!

 If you find yourself eating more food you can burn those extra calories with exercise. Take a 30 minute walk and burn 125 calories or run and burn 350 calories,

 Try water, seltzer or unsweetened tea instead of soda, juice or that extra glass of wine with dinner and you can save about 500 calories a day!

 

For every 5 minutes of watching TV, spend 1 minute walking. For an hour show, walk 12 minutes or get on the treadmill during commercials- anything to get you moving.

 

2011-2012 Dates and Events

 

9/18 – September Meeting – speaker booked

10/16 – October Meeting –

11/13 – November Meeting- speaker booked

12/ 11 – December Meeting

1/15 – January Meeting

1/22- HOLIDAY PARTY

2/19 – February Meeting – Heart Month

3/18 – March Meeting

4/15 -40th Anniversary and Meeting

5/20 – May Meeting

6/10 – June Meeting

 

Holiday Party

 

Our Holiday Party will be on Sunday January 22nd, 2012.    Time and Place to be announced.

 

Topic:    Arrhythmia and Fibrillation

Can you tell me the difference between arrhythmia and fibrillation? Are they the same thing?

Arrhythmia refers to a condition in which the heart rate is abnormal. It may be elevated or depressed, or it may have irregular characteristics, either continuously or episodically. Any symptomatic arrhythmias should always be assessed and managed quickly.

Consider an emergency medical consultation if you think you may have arrhythmias. Sometimes these are the only warnings our hearts give of an impending dangerous or life-threatening condition.

Atrial fibrillation (AF) is an arrhythmia in which the upper priming chambers of the heart have lost their regularity. Instead of contracting in a regular coordinated fashion, the atrial muscle responds to very rapid AF electrical signals and makes the cardiac walls of these upper chambers (the atria) literally writhe like a bag of worms.

When the AF rate is very high, the atrial muscle quivers and doesn’t contract effectively. Many AF patients are at increased risk of clot formation and stroke.

We use drugs to manage heart rates and sometimes use them to control the electrical signals. We also use electrical shock (cardioversion) for more urgent rhythm correction. Patients may also be offered surgical ablation to cure AF.

If you think you have an irregular heart rate or rhythm, see your doctor for a checkup. If the onset is sudden, go to the emergency department for rapid expert management. AF is best managed as early into the onset as possible.

AF can be controlled, and many new curative treatments are now available. Uncontrolled, untreated AF places us at significantly increased risk for stroke, so do not delay getting medical attention.

 

FOR YOUR INFORMATION

Upcoming Lectures:

Brookhaven Hospital:

Sept 21 –Wednesday “Leg Circulation, Wounds and Heart Disease Links”

Sept 28 – Women’s Different Heart Disease Symptoms”

Oct 5 – “Restorative Yoga for Heart Health”

 

All lectures are at 100 Hospital Road, Room 206 on Wednesdays from 6pm -7pm

 

On Sept 21 there will be a Vascular Victory Support Group after the regular lecture. Everyone is encouraged to stay and attend this open forum to ask questions and get answers

 

The 2011 American Heart Association Long Island Heart Walk is being held on Sunday September 25th at Jones Beach. The web site is up and our Team Page is open for business.  Our Team goal is $3500, which I feel is very attainable since we raised over $4500 last year.  With the influx of new people and by having our great team members returning from last year, I am hoping we can beat last year’s total.  Please log onto:

http://heartwalk.kintera.org/faf/home/default.asp?ievent=449569    

or google “Long Island Heart Walk to sign up. 

 

 This year the Heart Walk is including Stroke victims to raise awareness of strokes. Stroke survivors will be receiving White Caps.

Heart Survivors will be receiving Red Caps and children who are survivors – our little hero’s – will be receiving Red Capes.

 

We are planning our Fall and Winter schedule NOW for our Mended Hearts meetings.  If you wish to be a speaker at our meetings, or if would like a representative of Mended Hearts of Suffolk County to contact you, please contact John Dirr at (631) 338-2521 or email him at JohnFDirr@aol.com

 

The New Food Chart

(replaces the Food Pyramid)

 

 

Enjoy your food, but eat less.

 

Avoid oversized portions.

 

 

Foods to Increase

 

Make half your plate fruits and vegetables.

 

Make at least half your grains whole grains.

 

Switch to fat-free or low-fat (1%) milk.

 

 

Foods to Reduce

 

Compare sodium in foods like soup, bread, and frozen meals ― and choose the foods with lower numbers.

 

Drink water instead of sugary drinks.  

 

 

    

 

Fred and Natalie receive a Certificate of Appreciation for all the hard work they do all year for Mended Hearts of Suffolk County –

 Chapter #67. 

Thank you, Mr. President.

They wish to thank everyone for supporting them and wish to thank everyone for the wonderful gifts presented to them.

 

 John, Bob and Joe getting their “Busy Bee Award” for their continuous work for Mended Hearts of Suffolk County.  Thanks, fellas!!

 

Our June guest speaker from Gentle Dental

who gave fantastic information about on how to take care of our teeth.  Thank you for all the free samples!

 A note of thanks to Bob Feinman for taking these pictures for our newsletter. Couldn’t do without you, Bob!!

 

Little Mended Hearts of Long Island

Caring for the littlest hearts

Two Lynbrook mothers co-found L. I. chapter of ‘Mended Little Hearts’

As co-founders of the Long Island Chapter of Mended Little Hearts, Kaitlyn Beleckas and Shannan Pearsall, of Lynbrook, have found the issue of heart defects, support, and education very personal issues to their families. Beleckas’s daughter, Reagan, was born with multiple holes and congenital heart defects related to the left side of her heart, and Shannan’s son, Aidan, was born with Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome.

“Together, we’ve been able to provide support to one another,” said Pearsall. “It was important to be able to connect with someone who could relate to what my child and my family was going through.

“Upon hearing my daughter’s diagnosis during pregnancy I couldn’t help but wonder, why me?” Beleckas said. “I needed to hear that ‘this does stink, but you will get through it.’ To this day, Shannan is the first person I call after Reagan’s doctor’s appointments, because I know she will understand my fears and concerns. It is my hope that we can provide the same support to others.”

Mended Little Hearts of Long Island is the newest chapter of a national support organization for parents of children with heart defects and heart disease; it is dedicated to inspiring hope in those who care for the littlest heart patients of all. Their goal is to bring together Long Islanders who have been impacted by congenital heart defects The organization offers resources and a caring support network as families find answers and move forward to find healing and hope.


Congenital heart defects are the number one birth defect in the United States and the leading cause of birth defect related deaths in children under one year. Locally, Mended Little Hearts of Long Island is committed to creating awareness of this issue so that families who have children with these defects can have hope for a better future.


To kick off our new group, the first annual Mended Little Hearts picnic will be held on August 21 from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Cedar Creek Park, Seaford, NY.

To register for the picnic, email longislandny@mendedlittlehearts.org or visit longisland.mendedlittlehearts.net. Pre-Registration is required. Visit the website for group meetings, educational seminars, and events.

Little Hearts Hold Big Hopes
What: first annual Mended Little Hearts picnic
When: August 21 from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Where: Cedar Creek Park, Seaford, NY.
How: To register for the picnic, email longislandny@mendedlittlehearts.org or visit
longisland.mendedlittlehearts.net. Pre-Registration is required.

 

From Long Island Herald.com August 21, 2011

 

 

June Newsletter:

IN THIS ISSUE

 

May’s Speaker

Birthdays and Surgeversaries

New Members

Hospital Visits

Recipe of the Month and “How to Lose a Pound”

Topic: Is it a Heart Attack? Or is it Anxiety?

 

Upcoming Dates this Summer

 

July 4th - Independence Day

July 10th - “Hearts in the Park” – LI Ducks Game/fundraiser

September 5th -   Labor Day

September 18th – Mended Hearts Meeting

September 25thAmerican Heart Association

                                 Long Island  Heart Walk

 

July and August Birthdays

Hope you all enjoy your 29th Birthdays!

 

John D -7/13     Evelyn W 7/27

Theresa C -8/3    Eileen M – 8/14,

 Lorraine M – 8/30      Tom S – 8/2 

 

July and August Surgeversaries

Bob B -7/11,   Millicent T- 7/14,

 John D -7/26,     Bob F – 8/11,

      

   New Members- May

Welcome to Mended Hearts!

Paul Albanese, Michael O’Donnell,  Rick Potter

_Visitation Report:

Joe Edrehi, Joel Wohlegemuth ,Bob Barrett,

 Lew Chipp & Mel Baruch made

 35 visits to Stony Brook Hospital and they saw

 88 patients in the month of May.

Thank you for your hard work and effort bringing comfort to these patients.

 

  Get Well Wishes

Joanne Day, Walter Sevian

Please keep them in your thoughts and prayers.

 

THIS MONTHS RECIPES:

More Summer Grilling!!

(Last Month was Beef Burgers, this month TURKEY!)

 

Turkey Dinner Burgers

Makes: 4 servings   Prep: 15 minutes   Cook: 12 minutes

 

Ingredients

·         1 egg, slightly beaten

·         1/2 teaspoon salt

·         1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper

·         1 pound uncooked lean ground turkey or lean ground chicken

·         1/4 cup fine dry bread crumbs

·         1 tablespoon olive oil

·         1/4 cup  barbecue sauce

·         Prepackaged shredded red cabbage, thinly sliced red onion, and/or desired toppings

·         4    potato rolls, Kaiser Rolls, or hamburger buns, split and toasted

 

 

Directions

1. In a bowl combine egg, salt, and pepper. Add turkey and breadcrumbs; mix well. Shape the chicken mixture into four 3/4-inch-thick patties

 

 Lightly grease the rack of grill. Preheat grill. Place patties on the grill rack. If using a covered grill, close lid. Grill patties until chicken is no longer pink (165 degree F). (For a covered grill allow 5 to 7 minutes. For an uncovered grill, allow 14 to 18 minutes, turning once halfway through grilling.) Brush patties with pepper jelly or barbecue sauce and cook 1 minute more on each side as above.)

 

3. To assemble, place cabbage and red onion on bottom of rolls and top with meat.

Nutrition Facts

Calories 453, Total Fat (g) 15, Saturated Fat (g)3,

Cholesterol (mg) 58,   Sodium (mg) 853,    Carbohydrate (g) 48, Fiber (g) 2,   Protein (g) 31,

Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet

 

To have a healthier meal: Change the following in the recipe:

Do NOT add the ½ teaspoon of salt

Use Whole Wheat Rolls

Reduce the amount of Barbeque Sauce to lower the sodium and carbs even more!!

 

How to Lose a Pound:

 

To lose 1 pound per week you need to cut 3,500 calories from what you usually eat during the week 

This means eating 500 fewer calories per day!

If you find yourself eating more food you can burn those extra calories with exercise. Take a 30 minute walk and burn 125 calories or run and burn 350 calories,

Try water, seltzer or unsweetened tea instead of soda, juice or that extra glass of wine with dinner and you can save about 500 calories a day!

 

TOP 10  HEALTHY WAYS TO SURVIVE UNTIL  LUNCH/ DINNER

 

Whole pieces of fruit – bananas or apples

Canned soup (low sodium)

100 Calorie Packs

Nut mixes

Fat Free Yogurt

Low-fat cheese sticks

94% fat free microwave popcorn mini bags

Fiber One bars

Tuna pouches

Instant oatmeal

 

 

Is It a Heart Attack?

It’s not easy to know whether you’re having a heart attack. So-called “movie heart attacks,” in which the pain seems severe and sudden leaving little doubt a person is being stricken, are not typical. According to the American Heart Association, most heart attacks move slowly, causing mild pain that can be puzzling to the patient.

Heart experts advise if you think you might be having a heart attack, don’t try and figure it out for yourself. Call 9-1-1. Time matters, they warn. For every minute a heart attack goes on, precious heart muscle dies because of a lack of blood and oxygen feeding it. Know the warning signs and act.

1. Chest pains

Chest pain is a common symptom for heart attack, and how it presents can vary. It’s been described as a heaviness, tightness, or a squeezing in the chest. It can linger for a few minutes, or come and go, according to the Cleveland Clinic.

"It may be a chest fullness that they don't recognize as pain," Dr. Gordon Tomaselli, chief of cardiology at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, tells AARP.org. "Sometimes it doesn't particularly hurt. It's an uncomfortable sensation."

You might also be hit with sweating or a cold sweat, coughing, a feeling of lightheadedness, and breathing difficulty or shortness of breath.

2. Swelling

Proper circulation throughout the body requires a healthy heart. When the heart isn’t working correctly, blood can’t carry the body waste’s products away and that can lead to swelling from fluid retention, explains Caring.com. This condition, called edema, usually begins in the feet, legs, and ankles and can be accompanied by pain from a lack of blood to the tissue. Always alert your doctor to any pain and swelling you experience.

3. Heartburn

Sometimes it can be difficult to discern whether the chest pain you’re experiencing is heartburn or you’re having a heart attack. Experts say that if you are prone to heartburn and you have pain after a big or spicy meal, taking an antacid and seeing if the pain fades might make sense. However, if you’ve never had such pain before and it’s especially intense and you’re sweating too, play it safe and call 9-1-1, AARP.org advises. The same goes for a panic attack. If the racing heart is familiar to you, then perhaps you’re having another panic attack. But if the sensation feels foreign, act on the assumption it’s your heart that is suffering

4. How women’s symptoms differ

Many people might be surprised to hear that heart disease is the No. 1 killer of American women, surpassing cancer, writes Newsmax Health Contributor Dr. Chauncey Crandall in his Heart Health Report newsletter. While women experience many of the same classic heart attack symptoms men do such as chest pain, shortness of breath, and sweating, they are more likely to suffer from atypical ones that can be shrugged off as common health problems, he says. According to Crandall and the Cleveland Clinic, those include:

Pain in the upper back, neck, and shoulder

 Jaw pain

 Burning sensation in the chest

 Anxiety or confusion

 Unusual fatigue lasting for several days

 Indigestion • Nausea and vomiting

5. Call 9-1-1

If your heart attack symptoms worsen or get no better after five minutes, the American Heart Association recommends calling 9-1-1. Do this whether you’re convinced it’s a heart attack or not. This is the fastest way to get help because emergency medical services staff can begin treatment immediately, which is up to an hour sooner than if you’re driven by car to the hospital, according to the AHA. Also, patients suffering from chest pain who arrive via ambulance are more likely to receive attention faster at the hospital, the AHA says.

 

 

Is It Heart Attack or Anxiety?


Even with the elaborate medical diagnostics available, there will still be some people who want to diagnose themselves. I have ordered emergency coronary artery angioplasty and stenting for an 18-year-old male patient to try to save his heart; he had blamed his condition on a vigorous workout. I also have sent a 24-year-old female smoker and birth control pill user, who was sure she had indigestion and anxiety, to the catheterization lab for a right coronary artery blockage.

I’ve seen the woman with reported TMJ (temporomandibular joint) disorder and anxiety fall victim to unexpected cardiac arrest before she ever had a chance to see her doctor. She required resuscitation and an induced coma to protect her brain from her cardiac arrest and heart failure until she had recovered sufficiently.

Even professionals are easily fooled with chest pain diagnoses. If you’re ever wondering whether you’re having a heart attack, go to the hospital emergency department right away and place yourself in the hands of an expert in chest pain diagnosis: the emergency medicine physician.

Anxiety can be treated without prescription drugs. Relaxation techniques, meditation, hypnosis, yoga, and various calming teas can be far healthier than reaching for the Valium. Often a sedating antihistamine such as Benadryl or Vistaril will take sufficient edge off your symptoms.

Look for precipitants to the episodes and try to avoid them. Keep your diet low in caffeine and other stimulants, and be sure to get eight hours of undisturbed sleep each night. Shift work can complicate treatment, and sometimes melatonin and melatonin agonist treatment prescribed by your doctor will help with jet lag and shift work fatigue. Sometimes a low-dose beta-blocker such as Inderal will work well for stage fright. More involved management involving the use of a mood modifier, serotonin re-uptake inhibitor, or both also is possible.

If you have an anxiety episode that lasts for more than five minutes or recurring episodes, you should seek professional guidance without delay. Though anxiety may seem to be situational, sometimes it may be one of your only warnings of an underlying medical disorder. In women especially, fatigue and anxiety, experienced separately or in combination, may be your only warning of coronary artery disease.

 

FOR YOUR INFORMATION

 June 15th at Brookhaven Hospital at 6:00pm will be a lecture on the “New Alternative to Coumadin”. The lecture will be at: 100 Hospital Rd –Room 206. For information and to reserve a seat please call

 (631) 654-7240

 

 

There are NO MEETINGS scheduled for July or August at this time. Any information about the Long Island Heart Walk will be emailed to you, and you can also check our web site for any updates. The Long Island Heart Walk is scheduled for Sunday, September 25th at Jones Beach which is only ONE week after our September meeting.

At this time there will be no July or August newsletters planned to be printed or distributed. Our September newsletter will be distributed as usual.  Any important info will be emailed to you as always.

The 2011 American Heart Association Long Island Heart Walk is being held on Sunday September 25th at Jones Beach. The web site is up and our Team Page is open for business.  Our Team goal is $3500, which I feel is very attainable since we raised over $4500 last year.  With the influx of new people and by having our great team members returning from last year, I am hoping we can beat last year’s total.  Please log onto:

http://heartwalk.kintera.org/faf/home/default.asp?ievent=449569    or google “Long Island Heart Walk to sign up. 

 

 This year the Heart Walk is including Stroke victims to raise awareness of strokes. Stroke survivors will be receiving White Caps.

Heart Survivors will be receiving Red Caps and children who are survivors – our little hero’s – will be receiving Red Capes.

 

The American Heart Association 5K Run at Martha Clara Vineyards had a great turnout in spite of a cool and cloudy day.  Our member volunteers did a great job of helping out and talking to people who are Heart SURVIVORS.  We gave out hats to them and Hero Capes to the children SURVIVORS.

We signed up some potential new members and we were recognized for our work at the awards presentation.  Afterwards we had a great lunch provided by Bob and Maria, and Fred and Natalie and the little ole winemakers at Martha Clara. The winner of the LI Ducks raffle was Chris Manfredi.

Thank you for all who donated to our cause and to those who volunteered your time on Sunday.

We couldn’t have done it without you!

We are planning our Fall and Winter schedule NOW for our Mended Hearts meetings.  If you wish to be a speaker at our meetings, or if would like a representative of Mended Hearts of Suffolk County to contact you, please contact John Dirr at (631) 338-2521 or email him at JohnFDirr@aol.com

 

I recently found an online website that seems to be a good one stop place for heart patients, it is:

www.hearthealthyonline.com

It has just about everything a heart patient wants –

recipes and lots of information.

 

Ads Place Here

If you have a favorite store, restaurant, or any organization that would like to advertise in our newsletter, please let them know that this newsletter is distributed to all the attending members at our meeting, besides being emailed to our members and the following hospitals:

Stony Brook University, Brookhaven Hospital

Southside Hospital, Good Samaritan Hospital

And Peconic Bay Hospital

 

The cost to run an ad in this newsletter is $10 a month or

 $50 for 6 months

____________________________________________________

DLS

Accessible Services

Walk-In Tubs

Barrier Free Showers

Wheel Chair Lifts and Ramps

Stair Lift & Scooter Lifts

Call Dave @

631-255-4340

Financing Available

(Dave is a member of Mended Hearts)

__________________________________________

 

HAVE A GREAT SUMMER AND WE WILL SEE YOU IN SEPTEMBER!!

 

 
May Newsletter:
In This Issue

April’s Speaker

Birthdays and Surgeversaries

New Members

Hospital Visits

Recipe of the Month

Topic:  Depression and Heart Disease

Topic:  Why you Must Treat Cardiac Depression

Lectures at Suffolk County Hospitals

 

Upcoming Dates in June

June 12 -   Mended Hearts Meeting *Note earlier date

June 14 - Flag Day

June 19 - Father’s Day

June 21 - First Day of Summer

 

I’m sure due to the switching of our April meeting to an earlier date there was a miscommunication with Stony Brook about our speaker.  We also did not have our refreshments at our April meeting.  We apologize.

Instead we had a general discussion of a variety of subjects among our members. Alyssa and John spoke of their latest health issues; we discussed generic vs name brand medications and a variety of topics that our members voiced their opinions/ observations on.

We had a surprise visit from Dr. Rosengart who gave us a quick synopsis of what is happening at Stony Brook in regards to advances in their labs and what the future looks like with all the advances in cardiac care.

We thank Dr. Rosengart for taking a few minutes of his busy schedule to come and spend some time with us
 

June’s Speaker: June 12th

Gentle Dental of Port Jeff will be speaking about the linkage between Heart Disease, Diabetes and Oral Health

 

June Birthdays

Hope you all enjoy your 29th Birthdays!

Bill Closter 6/26   Bob Feinman 6/3

Alice Shaughnessy 6/14 Richard Skolnik 6/16

Michael Yank 6/1982  Charles Averna 6/13

June Surgeversaries

Jacquelyn LePre,  Charles Averna 6/22

Walter Sevian 6/5   Francine Schoenfeld 6/6 

New Members- April

“Pegge” Becker, Mary Ellen Childs, Lou Mannino

Gail Frangione, Nathan Jablon

Welcome to Mended Hearts!

____________________________________

Visitation Report:

Joe Edrehi, Joel Wohlgemuth, Bob Barrett, Lew Chipp and Mel Baruch made visits to Stony Brook Hospital and they saw  63   patients in the month of April.

Thank you for your hard work and effort bringing comfort to these patients.

 

East Meets West Burgers

 

Summers Coming – Fire up the Grill!

 

Ingredients

1 pound ground beef (95% lean)

1/4 cup soft whole wheat bread crumbs

1 large egg white

1/4 teaspoon salt

1/8 teaspoon black pepper

4 whole wheat hamburger buns,  split

 

Sesame-Soy Mayonnaise:

1/4 cup light mayonnaise

1 tablespoon thinly sliced green onion, green part only

1/2 teaspoon soy sauce  

1/4 teaspoon dark sesame oil

1/8 teaspoon ground red pepper

 

Slaw Topping:

1/2 cup romaine lettuce, thinly sliced

1/4 cup shredded red cabbage

1/4 cup shredded carrot

1 teaspoon rice vinegar

1/4 teaspoon black pepper

Instructions

1.      Combine Sesame-Soy Mayonnaise ingredients in small bowl; refrigerate until ready to use.

2.      Combine Slaw Topping ingredients in small bowl, set aside.

3.      Combine ground beef, bread crumbs, egg white, salt and 1/8 teaspoon black pepper in large bowl, mixing lightly but thoroughly. Lightly shape into four 1/2-inch thick patties.

4.      Place patties on grid over medium ash-covered coals. Grill, covered, 11 to 13 minutes (over medium heat on preheated gas grill, covered, 7 to 8 minutes), until instant-read thermometer inserted horizontally into center registers 160°F, turning occasionally. About 2 minutes before burgers are done, place buns, cut sides down, on grid. Grill until lightly toasted.

5.      Spread equal amount of mayonnaise on bottom of each bun, top with burger. Evenly divide Slaw Topping over burgers. Close sandwiches.

Disregard the Salt in the recipe for a healthier burger. Use Low Sodium Soy Sauce to reduce the sodium even more!

 

Nutrition information per serving:

 348 calories;    15 g fat

 (4 g saturated fat; 3 g monounsaturated fat);

 7 mg cholesterol; 621 mg sodium;- Less if you make the above adjustments. 26 g carbohydrate;             3.9 g fiber;   28 g protein.

This recipe is an excellent source of protein, niacin, vitamin B6, vitamin B12, iron, selenium and zinc; and a good source of fiber.

Depression and Heart Disease

By some estimates, people who suffer from depression are about 65% more likely to develop heart disease, and up to one in five people with heart disease will develop depression.

Which condition comes first?
The World Health Organization predicts that by 2002 heart disease will be the number one cause of death and disability worldwide and that
depression will be second. But the extent to which these two chronic conditions are caused by each other, or happen to occur in tandem, is an area experts are still exploring. How to treat both conditions simultaneously is another.

“Depression as a risk factor for heart disease leads us to question whether we should be treating the mind and the body together,” says Leo Pozuelo, MD, associate director of the Bakken Heart-Brain Institute at the Cleveland Clinic.

“Depression makes people sicker”
Whichever comes first, depression and heart disease make a devastating combination. Depression can also get in the way of recovery once you have heart disease.

Research suggests that repeat cardiovascular events are more closely associated with depression than they are with smoking,
diabetes, high blood pressure, or high cholesterol. A recent Duke University study also found that depressed heart-failure patients were 50% more likely to die or to be hospitalized for their heart condition than patients who were not depressed.

In the first six months after a heart attack, a depressed person’s chances of dying are four times higher than a nondepressed person’s, even if they have the same heart damage. “Depression itself makes people sicker in ways that we don’t really have a clear understanding of,” says Kenneth Robbins, MD, professor of psychiatry at the University of Wisconsin–Madison.

Whether you’ve battled depression for years or only developed symptoms after your heart disease, taking your depression seriously may be the best thing you do for odds of surviving heart disease.

 

Why You Must Treat Cardiac Depression

 

Doctors don’t yet know if treating depression can prevent heart disease, but they do know that if you have heart disease and you’re depressed, treating depression is critical to your recovery and your quality of life.

It’s normal to feel a bit blue and anxious shortly after treatment for a heart condition. But if you don’t feel better after two to three weeks, you may need psychological help.

Your cardiologist may not understand
Unfortunately many heart specialists may not have the time or the expertise to address depression, says Sharonne Hayes, MD, director of the Mayo Clinic’s Women’s Heart Clinic.

Cardiologists may not be comfortable with touchy-feely stuff,” she says. “They want to treat lipids and chest pain.” And most are not trained to cope with mental health issues.

Jim McBride, 63, of Dover, Del., started feeling anxious and depressed about a month after his heart attack in 2006, but none of his doctors told him about the link between depression and recovery. “Had I been told before leaving the hospital or soon after about some of the potential effects of the heart attack, I probably would have gotten help sooner for the anxiety and depression and known what to expect,” he says.

When heart doctors seem unconcerned about your mood, go elsewhere for help—either your primary care physician or a mental health
specialist.

McBride finally turned to his primary care physician who prescribed an
antidepressant, anti-anxiety medication, and therapy. “It immediately helped my mental state and allowed me to concentrate fully on my heart recovery,” he says.

 

Antidepressants can be heart medicines


Treatments for depression range from talk and behavioral
therapy to exercise to medication. For many patients the cornerstone of treatment will be an antidepressant medication, most likely an SSRI (selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitor) such as Prozac, Paxil, or Zoloft.

“SSRIs are really heart medicines in disguise,” says Wayne Sotile, PhD, director of psychological services at the Wake Forest University Healthy Exercise & Lifestyle Programs and author of Thriving With Heart Disease (Free Press, 2003).

Research suggests SSRIs can help prevent blood clots and encourage healthy rhythms in the heart. And when taken properly, they can lift patients out of the depression and move them toward recovery.

 

FOR YOUR INFORMATION

Lectures at Suffolk County Hospitals for April

At Brookhaven Hospital the following lectures will be held:

Wednesday, May 4th “Stress & Emotions of Heart & Vascular Disease”   (Psychiartry and Behavorial Health)

 

SPECIAL LECTURE

Thursday, May 12th “Cardiology A-Z” Find out why your physician ordered those tests? What are the risks? What are the benefits? What information will it provide? Come and meet the Cardiologists and ask the questions you want answers to. Find out what you need to know about Cardiac Testing & Procedures and how it will affect your health.

Dr. Khalili - Non Invasive Cardiology testing

Dr. Joseph - Invasive Cardiology testing and procedures

Dr. Parekh – Electrophysiology Update

Dr. Schwartz -The Future of the Invasive Cardiology Program at Brookhaven Memorial Hospital

Admission - Free - Limited Seating –  6-7:30pm

 Registration Required    Call Carolyn Villegas (631) 687-2900

 

Wednesday, May 11th “Heart Smart Exercise”

(Nutritional Services)

Wednesday, May 18th “Strokes – Simplified Answers to All  Your Questions” (Clinical Coordinator Stroke Unit) 6:00-8:00pm 

100 Hospital Rd –Room 206   All times: 6-7pm unless otherwise noted

 

American Heart Association Information

 

Those interested in participating in the American Heart Association “Healing Hearts 5K” race on May 22nd at the Martha Clara Vineyards are urged to visit the website to sign up:

www.heartwalk.kintera.org/healingheart5k.

 

Mended Hearts of Suffolk County supports the “Healing Hearts 5K” run and will have a table at Martha Clara.

 

We will also be selling tickets for our LI DUCKS fundraiser at the 5K Run at Martha Clara on May 22nd.  Tickets are $13 each and a portion goes to the support of Mended Hearts of Suffolk County. The game is on July 10th at 5pm in Central Islip at the Bethpage Ball Park

 

The 2011 American Heart Association Long Island Heart Walk is being held on Sunday September 25th at Jones Beach. The web site is up and our Team Page is open for business.  Our Team goal is $3500, which I feel is very attainable since we raised over $4500 last year.  With the influx of new people and by having our great team members returning from last year, I am hoping we can beat last year’s total.  Please log onto:

http://heartwalk.kintera.org/faf/home/default.asp?ievent=449569    or google “Long Island Heart Walk” to sign up. 

 

 This year the Heart Walk is including Stroke victims to raise awareness of strokes. Stroke survivors will be receiving White Caps.

Heart Survivors will be receiving Red Caps and children who are survivors – our little hero’s – will be receiving Red Capes.

 

”Hearts in the Park”

Mended Hearts will be having a fundraising event with the Long Island Ducks on Sunday, July 10th at Bethpage Park in Central Islip, the home of the Long Island Ducks.

The Long Island Ducks are playing the Somerset Patriots at 5:00pm.  We will be sitting together as a group and will have our group mentioned at the game on the Ducks scoreboard.

We can start selling tickets now. All money must be handed in by our meeting on May15th.  You will receive the tickets 4 weeks before the game to distribute to those who attending the game.  This is for anyone who LOVES baseball and wants to help Mended Hearts.

 

If you received this newsletter and are interested in purchasing tickets, please contact John Dirr at JohnFDirr@aol.com or by calling 631-338-2521between 7pm -9pm weekdays or on weekends 10am -4pm, preferably by email.

The tickets cost $13.00 each and a portion is going to Mended Hearts of Suffolk County.

 

Tired of snow and rain?  Spring is finally here!

It's almost time for the 16th Annual East End Garden Festival to benefit Peconic Bay Medical Center.

This year it is scheduled for May 5-8 in Riverhead at the Staples Shopping Center and Westhampton

Beach on the Great Lawn.

Why not purchase a Garden Festival Voucher!

When you purchase a voucher for $10, you are entitled to redeem your voucher at our Garden Festival

for $12 worth of plants and/or tree products. 

 You may purchase as many vouchers as you want.

All Garden Vouchers must be purchased no later than May 2, 2011.

Please call the Foundation Office at

(631) 548-6080

to purchase your vouchers today!

  Let all your friends know about this great way to save money and support Peconic Bay Medical Center at the same time!

 

Ads Place Here

If you have a favorite store, restaurant, or any organization that would like to advertise in our newsletter, please let them know that this newsletter is distributed to all the attending members at our meeting, besides being emailed to our members and the following hospitals:

Stony Brook University, Brookhaven Hospital

Southside Hospital, Good Samaritan Hospital

and Peconic Bay Hospital

The cost is $10 a month or $50 for 6 months

________________________________________________

DLS

Accessible Services

Walk-In Tubs

Barrier Free Showers

Wheel Chair Lifts and Ramps

Stair Lift & Scooter Lifts

Call Dave @

631-255-4340

Financing Available

(Dave is a member of Mended Hearts)

 

 

Mended Hearts of Suffolk County advertises our meetings in the Long Island Pennysaver, The Long Island Advance, Newsday, South Bay News, and the Times Beacon Record- North Shore editions when space is available. 

Please let these editors know you look for our ads in their newspapers.

 

Finally- Happy Mother’s Day to all the Moms!!

 

*************************************************************************************************************************

 

 
April Newsletter:

IN THIS ISSUE

Our BIGGEST Edition yet!

 

March’s Speaker

Birthdays and Surgeversaries

New Members

Hospital Visits

Recipe of the Month

Topics: How Much Exercise Do You Need to Prevent Heart Disease / Reasons to Get Back on a Bike

     Lectures at Suffolk County Hospitals

 

Upcoming Dates in May

May 5 -     Cinco de Mayo

May 8 -     Mother’s Day

May 15 -   Mended Hearts Meeting

May 22 -   Healing Heart 5K at Martha Clara Vineyards

May 30 -   Memorial Day

 

March’s Meeting:

Although we did not have a speaker for our March meeting, we had an interesting meeting when we went around the room and our members shared their stories about their journeys with their different heart conditions. Our new members got to meet our regular members and learn from the members stories.  This was a great reminder to all that heart disease does not mean the end to your living, but that you can LIVE with it and lead a productive life.

May Birthdays

Hope you all enjoy your 29th Birthdays!

 

Ernst Mueller 5/1,     Joel Wohlgemuth 5/8,

 Kurt Waitzmann 5/15,    Jacklyn LePre 5/26,

 Joe Edrehi 5/30

 

May Surgeversaries

Alyssa Esposito - 5/16/2009

Joanne Day - 5/15/2009

Lew Chipp - 5/2009

2009 was a Great year!!

 

          New Members- March

Welcome to Mended Hearts!

____________________________________

Visitation Report:

Joe Edrehi, Joel Wohlegemuth, Bob Barrett, Lew Chipp and Mel Baruch made visits to Stony Brook Hospital and they saw 59 patients in the month of March.

Thank you for your hard work and effort bringing comfort to these patients.

 

  Get Well Wishes

Good to see Ernst and Eloise back at our meeting this past month.  John Dirr has successfully recouped from his atrial fib and fainting spell.

Please keep them in your thoughts and prayers.

 

 

THIS MONTHS RECIPES:

 

Spanish Chicken Recipe

 

1 pound skinless, boneless chicken breasts

 3 green onions, chopped

1 cup chopped tomato 

1 can (4 ounces) diced green chiles

1/8 teaspoon ground cumin

1/8 teaspoon ground black pepper

1/4 teaspoon salt (optional)

YIELD: 4 servings  SERVING SIZE: 1/4 recipe                       CARB SERVINGS: 0  EXCHANGES: 3 lean meat

There are 3 different methods to cook this receipe:

Conventional Oven: Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Spray an 8" x 8" pan with nonstick cooking spray. Arrange chicken in the pan. Top with remaining ingredients. Bake uncovered for 2

Microwave Oven: Arrange chicken in an 8" x 8" microwave-safe dish that has been sprayed with nonstick cooking spray. Top with remaining ingredients. Cover, venting the lid, and cook on high for 6-8 minutes, rotating 1/4 turn halfway through cooking time. Time will vary with thickness of chicken.  25-35 minutes or until chicken is done. 

Barbecue or Broiling: Barbecue or broil chicken about 3-4 minutes on each side or until done. Mix remaining ingredients in a microwave-safe bowl. Cover, venting the lid, and cook on high in microwave until heated throughout, about 2 minutes. Pour over cooked chicken. 

Nutrient Analysis: Calories: 147 Total fat: 3g Saturated fat: 1g  Cholesterol: 69mg  Sodium: 77mg  Total carbohydrate: 4g  Dietary fiber: 1g  Sugars: 2g Protein: 26g

How Much Exercise Do You Need to Prevent Heart Disease:      How much exercise is enough?
The amount of exercise it takes to help prevent heart disease is a matter of debate. Some experts urge people to exercise more frequently and moderately; others push for longer, more vigorous workouts. "The sad fact is, most Americans are sedentary,". "One-quarter doesn’t even exercise at all. So getting them to move at all is an improvement."
Some studies show that regular exercise—30 to 60 minutes a day—lowers blood sugar and blood pressure, boosts HDL (good cholesterol), and can reduce the protein that contributes to blood clots.
A study of more than 44,000 men found that even moderate exercise can shield against heart disease. Compared with men who got little or no exercise, those who walked briskly for at least 30 minutes each day were about 20% less likely to develop heart disease.
Lifting weights—a type of exercise once dismissed by cardiologists for people with
high blood pressure—also reduced risk by about 25%.  Running at least an hour each week cut the risk by 40%.
Exercise helps people lose weight, though a surprising study by researchers at the Cooper Institute for Aerobics Research in Dallas found it is better for your heart for you to be fit than thin. Unfit, lean men had a higher risk of death from cardiovascular disease than men who were fit and
obese.
Exercise is also associated with other healthy behaviors, like not
overeating and not smoking.
David Cullen, 47, has found that his choice to exercise prompts him to make other healthy choices. "The more I run, the less likely I am to want junk food," he says.


Never too late to start  A German study found that people who exercised regularly during their lifetimes were 60% less likely to be diagnosed with
coronary heart disease than sedentary people.
But those who became physically active only after the age of 40 were around 55% less likely to be diagnosed with heart disease than those who had been inactive all their lives.

 

Reasons to Get Back on a Bike

You probably loved riding a bike when you were a kid: legs turning, hair flying, and heart pumping. Biking made you independent and kept you in motion. Now that you’re older, biking can still be a great way to get moving. It builds stamina, strength, and muscle tone, and improves cardiovascular fitness — while still going easy on the joints. Fight middle-age weight gain- Regular biking can cut the number of pounds you gain during your middle-age years. Researchers followed 18,414 premenopausal women over a 16-year period. During that time, the women gained an average of 20.5 pounds, but normal-weight women who were biking more than four hours a week by the end of that time period were 26 percent less likely to gain more than five percent of their initial body weight. Women who were obese and overweight and bicycling two to three hours weekly were 46 percent less likely to gain weight.

 

Soothe your tummy - Bike regularly and calm an irritated bowel. In a study of 102 adults with irritable bowel syndrome, 43 percent of those who got 20 to 60 minutes of moderate-to-vigorous exercise — like biking or brisk walking — three to five days a week showed significant improvement in their symptoms of cramps, diarrhea, bloating, and constipation. Only a quarter of the participants who maintained their regular lifestyle reported improvements.

Researchers, whose work recently appeared in the American Journal of Gastroenterology, noted previous studies have shown that exercise can relieve gas and constipation by getting the digestive system moving.

 

Preserve your memory - Two studies found that regular aerobic exercise in mid-life, including biking, brisk walking, swimming, and yoga, not only forestall memory problems that often come with aging, but can actually improve the brain function of adults with mild cognitive impairment. One of the studies, conducted at the University Of Washington School Of Medicine, showed that six months of 45 to 60 minutes of exercise four days a week did the trick. Another study found that exercise appears to slow the loss of brain tissue that usually begins around age 40. Recent animal tests performed at Columbia University discovered that exercise actually grew new brain cells.

 

Combat inactivity - Pedaling can offer an alternative to our sedentary work lives. In a study reported in the British Journal of Sports Medicine, women office workers who spent at least 75 percent of their day seated at a work station used a portable bike device for an average of 23 minutes a day on 12 of 20 workdays. They pedaled the equivalent of one-third of a mile to nearly 13.5 miles and burned nine to more than 500 calories a day. Researchers found that the pedaling did not interfere with participants’ work, and said that if done regularly and intensely, 23 minutes of pedaling could boost health.


Ride safe - Before you hop on your bike, make sure you’ve taken safety precautions. Always wear a helmet, and make sure it fits snugly. Once the chin strap is clasped, the helmet should not move from side to side or front to back, says familydoctor.org.                                                                Consider these other safe-biking tips from familydoctor.org before you ride:

 • Make sure drivers can see you; wear bright, reflective clothing.

 • Stay alert and look for anything in your way, such as debris in the road.

 • Use appropriate lights for riding when visibility or is poor; avoid riding at night.

 • Wear padded shorts for a comfortable ride. • Wear sports sunglasses to help keep bugs and dusts from getting in your eyes.

________________________________________________

 

FOR YOUR INFORMATION

Lectures at Suffolk County Hospitals for April

At Good Samaritan Hospital in April are the following lectures:

 Thursday, April 14 “Organ and Blood Donations—Myths vs. Facts” NY Donor Network and LI Blood Services     6:00 pm – 8:00 pm

Saturday, April 16 “To Your Health—Peripheral Arterial Disease”   Charles LaRosa, MD Surgeon

9:00 am – 10:00 am Screenings

10:00 am – 12:00 pm Lecture

Call 631-376-4444 to register (must register)

At Brookhaven Hospital the following lectures will be held:

Wednesday, April 6th “Women’s Different Heart Disease Symptoms” (cardiovascular services)

Wednesday, April 13th “Heart & Vascular Daily Health

(Cardiac diagnostic lab)

Wednesday, April 20th “High Blood Pressure – the Silent Killer?!”  6:00-8:00pm (Stroke & Cardiovascular Services)

Wednesday, April 27th   “Healthy Heart & Vascular Nutrition” (cardiac rehab Exercise Physiologist)

Wednesday, May 4th “Stress & Emotions of Heart & Vascular Disease”   (Psychiatry and Behavioral Health dept)

 

100 Hospital Rd –Room 206   All times: 6-7pm unless otherwise noted

 

”Hearts in the Park”

Mended Hearts will be having a fundraising event with the Long Island Ducks on Sunday, July 10th at Bethpage Park in Central Islip, the home of the Long Island Ducks.

The Long Island Ducks are playing the Somerset Patriots at 5:00pm.  We will be sitting together as a group and will have our group mentioned at the game on the Ducks scoreboard.

We can start selling tickets now. All money must be handed in by our meeting on May15th.  You will receive the tickets 4 weeks before the game to distribute to those who attending the game.  This is for anyone who LOVES baseball and wants to help Mended Hearts.

 

If you received this newsletter and are interested in purchasing tickets, please contact John Dirr at JohnFDirr@aol.com or by calling 631-338-2521between 7pm -9pm weekdays or on weekends 10am -4pm, preferably by email.

The tickets cost $13.00 each and a portion is going to Mended Hearts of Suffolk County.

 

MEMBERS:  At our April 10th meeting, we need to have an accurate number of tickets sold for our Long Island Ducks fundraiser.  Please secure your family and friend’s commitment since we only have one more meeting in April to discuss it. I have to contact the Ducks and give them a total so far.

 The final count and money must be in at our May 15th meeting.  IT IS COMING FAST!!

 

Those interested in participating in the American Heart Association “Healing Hearts 5K” race on May 22nd at the Martha Clara Vineyards are urged to visit the website to sign up:

www.heartwalk.kintera.org/healingheart5k.

Mended Hearts of Suffolk County supports the “Healing Hearts 5K” run and will have a table at Martha Clara.

 

Members: Also, the American Heart Association is asking our help for the 5K Run/Walk on May 22nd.  They need volunteers to assist with the little kids race and to hand out vouchers to them.  More details at our April meeting. But I will need names and a commitment to this event.  It should only last for a short period of time in the morning.

 

The 2011 American Heart Association Long Island Heart Walk is being held on Sunday September 25th at Jones Beach. The web site is up and our Team Page is open for business.  Our Team goal is $3500, which I feel is very attainable since we raised over $4500 last year.  With the influx of new people and by having our great team members returning from last year, I am hoping we can beat last year’s total.  Please log onto:

http://heartwalk.kintera.org/faf/home/default.asp?ievent=449569    or google “Long Island Heart Walk to sign up. 

 

 This year the Heart Walk is including Stroke victims to raise awareness of strokes. Stroke survivors will be receiving White Caps.

Heart Survivors will be receiving Red Caps and children who are survivors – our little hero’s – will be receiving Red Capes.

_____________________________________________

 

CORRECTION:  Last month it was stated that Joe Edrehi was stepping down as the Visitation Chairperson. Joe is NOT stepping down, but curtailing his visits to the hospital. Joe will continue to lead and organize our Visitation commitment to patients.

____________________________________________

 

Mended Hearts Information

 

It's Official!  Mended Hearts and the American College of Cardiology Join Hands to Reach Mutual Goals

In February, the Mended Hearts National Board of Directors reviewed highlights of a newly signed Letter of Agreement between The Mended Hearts, Inc. and the American College of Cardiology (ACC) to further the goals of both organizations.  Further details are being readied to send to chapter leaders in early March outlining some of the positive key implications of the Agreement.  As a reminder, the Board of Directors in mid-2010 developed a list of non-negotiable principles for aligning with an anchor organization, including maintaining our independent, 501-C-3 status, maintaining our current volunteer and staff structure, increasing revenue to build both the MHI and MLH programs, and optimizing synergies inherent in each of the organizations, among several others.  The Agreement meets all of these terms.  MHI staff met with ACC staff in mid-February to develop a communications plan for announcing the alliance to both internal and external audiences in the March/April timeframe. Stay tuned for more details to follow.

________________________________________________

 

 

DLS

Accessible Services

Walk-In Tubs

Barrier Free Showers

Wheel Chair Lifts and Ramps

Stair Lift & Scooter Lifts

Call Dave @

631-255-4340

Financing Available

(Dave is a member of Mended Hearts)

______________________________________

 
March Newsletter:

IN THIS ISSUE

 

February’s Speaker

Birthdays and Surgeversaries

New Members

Hospital Visits

Recipe of the Month

Topic:  Ways to Stave Off Stokes

Topic: How to Identify a Stroke

Long Island Heart Walk information

 

Upcoming Dates in April

 Apr 10 -   Mended Hearts Meeting * note earlier date

Apr 17     Palm Sunday

Apr 19 -   First Day of Passover

Apr 22 -   Good Friday / Earth Day

Apr 24 -   Easter Sunday

 

February’s Speaker:

We had an excellent speaker at our February meeting, Suzette Smookler, who is the Director of Clinical Nutrition at  Stony Brook Hospital. She spoke about Nutrition and Diabetes. Here are some topics she spoke about:

 Never Eat Margarine – it is full of Saturated Fats! Eat Earth Balance which is made from Olive Oil. “Eggs are not the devil we thought they were.” You can eat 5 eggs a week with no problem.

The best way to tell if you are overweight is to measure how tall you are, then measure around your waist.  Your waist size should be HALF the inches of how tall you are!

New standards of sodium are 1500 mg a day!  If there is more than 300 mg in portion on a label – you will be over the new standard.  Create your own seasoning – lemon, lime, pepper,  Mrs Dash, etc

We had so much info to cover that we will invite Suzette back again this Fall to speak at another one of our meetings.

 

 In an effort to attract more people to Mended Hearts, there will be a special Mended Hearts meeting to be held at Brookhaven Memorial Hospital sometime this spring. Stay tuned for exact date and times.
 

April Birthdays

Hope you all enjoy your 29th Birthdays!

Josephine Day  4/15

Fred Dicrescento  4/23

Kevin Hickey  4/23

April  Surgeversaries

Daniel Moran  4/27

Joel Wohlgemuth 4/27

        

   New Members- February

Francine Schoenfeld, Rosanne Cann, Anne Lavoie,

 and Lew Chipp

Welcome to Mended Hearts!

____________________________________

 

Visitation Report:

Joe Edrehi, Joel Wohlgemuth and Bob Barrett made 7

  visits to Stony Brook Hospital and they saw 26   patients in the month of February.

Thank you for your hard work and effort bringing comfort to these patients.

 

  Get Well Wishes

Joanne Day is going thru some medical challenges right now and could use good thoughts sent her way.

Ernst and Eloise Mueller are still recuperating from their surgeries.

Please keep them in your thoughts and prayers.

  

THIS MONTHS RECIPES:

 

Apple Cinnamon Oatmeal w/ an Egg Boost

 

1 Egg    1/3 Cup Milk       1 pkg(1.23oz) apples & cinnamon oatmeal      ¼ Cup Vanilla Yogurt

 

Beat Egg and Milk in a 2 cup microwave safe bowl until blended.  Stir in Oatmeal.

Microwave on HIGH until liquid is absorbed and egg is set 1 ½ to 2 minutes.  Stir.  Top with Oatmeal,  Garnish with chopped apples.

 Calories 292, Total Fat 9g,  Sat Fat 3g, 196mg cholesterol, 317 mg sodium,  15g protein

 

Use Low Fat or Non Fat Milk to reduce the Fat in this recipe

(Thank you Suzette Smookler and the recipe cards from Egg Nutrition Center)

 

Ways to Stave Off Stroke

Strokes, which typically occur when a blocked blood vessel cuts blood flow to the brain, are the fourth-leading cause of death in the United States. But up to 80 percent of strokes are preventable by leading a healthy lifestyle that includes not smoking, eating a diet rich in fruits and vegetables and low in salt, exercising regularly, drinking moderately or not at all, and carefully managing chronic diseases like diabetes.

Deaths due to stroke have declined, yet as the population ages the number of people having strokes is expected to rise. Don’t be one of those people.

1) Control Blood Pressure:  High blood pressure is a leading risk factor for stroke, according to the National Stroke Association. When pressure is high, the heart pumps harder to move blood through your body, weakening vessel walls and organs. It is called the “silent killer” because symptoms of high blood pressure are not obvious. An optimal blood pressure reading for adults is 120/80. The first number is for systolic pressure, the force of blood against vessel walls when the heart is pumping. The second number is for diastolic pressure, the blood’s force on vessels when the heart is resting between beats. A high-sodium diet, drinking excessively, and being overweight all contribute to hypertension, health experts say.

2) Eat More Fish: Fish lovers are less likely to have a stroke. That’s the conclusion of a study published this month in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition that found that women who ate more than three servings of fish a week were 16 percent less likely to have a stroke compared with women who ate less than one. The findings support similar results of other studies on stroke and fishy diets. Fish rich in omega-3 fatty acids, including salmon, mackerel, and albacore tuna, are best choices because the substances may reduce blood pressure and blood-fat concentrations that increase stroke risk. (But be sure not to fry the fish, which can rob it of its beneficial fats, health experts say.)
 

3) Walk off the Risk: Reduce your stroke risk one step at a time. A study of 39,000 healthy women 45 and older found that those who walked two or more hours a week had a lower risk of stroke than those who walked less than two hours a week. The most active women were 17 percent less likely to have a stroke, compared with the least active. And those who walked more than two hours per week were 30 percent less apt to suffer a stroke than those who didn’t walk at all.  "More active people generally demonstrate a 25 to 30 percent lower risk of stroke."

Other risk factors of stroke are: Tobacco use, atrial fib , heart disease,  high red blood cell count, high cholesterol, overweight and obesity, excessive alcohol intake, carotid and other artery disease.

There are five main warning signs of a stroke. You or someone you know might experience some or all of them.

1. Sudden vision problems; difficulty seeing out of one or both eyes.

2. Sudden headache; severe pain with no apparent cause.

3. Sudden confusion; you become unable to think or speak clearly, or can’t understand what others are saying to you.

4. Sudden numbness; weakness and lack of feeling in the face, arm, or leg, particularly if it is isolated on one side of the body.

5. Sudden lack of coordination, including dizziness or loss of balance.

Time is your best ally against a stroke. The biggest mistakes people make when they experience stroke warning signs are denial, indecision, and waiting too long to get help.

If you can get to the hospital right away, doctors can get the arteries opened up with medication or surgery. Often, the stroke can be stopped in its tracks so that damage is reduced or even reversed . In addition to recognizing the warning signs, it is important to call 911 and get a paramedic on the scene as soon as possible. Do not try to drive yourself or a loved one to the hospital. You will only waste precious time.  Paramedics have a specific protocol in place for stroke patients. They are obligated to take you to a designated stroke hospital, and will call ahead with a “stroke alert.” This means the hospital will begin to assemble a qualified team in the emergency room while you are still on the way. That’s the level of urgency required for stroke care.  Once in the hospital, a stroke patient immediately will be given a neurological exam and be sent for a CT scan of the brain. That will determine if the cause is bleeding or a clot. If it’s a clot, additional tests will be performed to determine the location of the clot, then a blood thinner can be administered. All of this needs to happen quickly to limit damage.

ACT F-A-S-T at the First Sign of STROKE

 

Face – does the face look uneven?  Ask the person to Smile

Arm- ask the person to raise both arms. Does 1 arm drift   down?

Speech- Does their speech sound strange? Ask the person to repeat a simple line – “The sky is blue.”

Time – If you observe any of these signs – then it    is Time to call 9-1-1

The first HOUR is so important. DO  NOT DELAY in getting to the hospital.

Brookhaven Memorial Hospital is a Designated Stroke Center and has won many awards since 2006.

FOR YOUR INFORMATION

Lectures at Suffolk County Hospitals for March

Good Samaritan Hospital: Thursday March 24th from 6:00pm- 8:00pm “Nutrition for a Healthy Family- Quick Healthy Meals for the Family on the Run”

Cathy Davis –registered Dietician with a cooking demonstration by Chef Lori Linich

Thursday, April 14  Community Lecture: Organ and Blood Donations—Myths vs. Facts”

With New York Donor Network and Long Island Blood Services     6:00 pm – 8:00 pm

Call 631-376-4444 to register (must register)

 

Brookhaven Memorial Hospital: Wednesday, March 2nd from 6:00pm-7:00pm “Various Emotions of Heart and Vascular Disease”. Call 631-654-7240 for more information and to register (recommended)

________________________________________________

”Hearts at the Park”

We will be having a fundraising event with the Long Island Ducks on Sunday, July 10th at Bethpage Park in Central Islip, the home of the Long Island Ducks.The Long Island Ducks are playing the Somerset Patriots at 5:00pm.  We will be sitting together as a group and will have our group mentioned at the game on the Ducks scoreboard.We can start selling tickets now. All money must be handed in by our meeting on May15th.  You will receive the tickets 4 weeks before the game to distribute to those who attending the game.  This is for anyone who LOVES baseball and wants to help Mended Hearts. If you received this newsletter and are interested in purchasing tickets, please contact John Dirr at JohnFDirr@aol.com or by calling 631-338-2521between 7pm -9pm weekdays or on weekends 10am -4pm, preferably by email.The tickets cost $13.00 each and a portion is going to Mended Hearts of Suffolk County.

Those interested in participating in the American Heart Association “Healing Hearts 5K” race on May 22nd at the Martha Clara Vineyards are urged to visit the website to sign up:www.heartwalk.kintera.org/healingheart5kMended Hearts of Suffolk County supports the “Healing Hearts 5K” run and will have a table at Martha Clara.

Please note that Mended Hearts of Suffolk County will have a table at Stony Brook University Hospital on Saturday, March 12th.   This will be a chance to give information about Mended Hearts out to the families of patients and raise awareness of our group.

________________________________________________

 John Dirr has been selected to be the Co-Chairperson of the American Heart Association Long Island Heart Walk for Community Groups.  John will be working with groups, like Mended Hearts, in getting them organized to have a successful Heart Walk campaign.

________________________________________________

 The 2011 American Heart Association Long Island Heart Walk is being held on Sunday September 25th at Jones Beach. The web site is up and our Team Page is open for business.  Our Team goal is $3500, which I feel is very attainable since we raised over $4500 last year.  With the influx of new people and having great team members last year, I am hoping we can beat last year’s total.  Please log onto:

http://heartwalk.kintera.org/faf/home/default.asp?ievent=449569    or google “Long Island Heart Walk to sign up.

  This year the Walk is including Stroke victims and to raise awareness of strokes.

_________________________________________________

 Congratulations to Southside Hospital for the successful start of their Open Heart Surgery that began on Feb. 14th!!

_________________________________________________

 We want to thank Joe Edrehi for his invaluable work as the Visitation Chairperson.  Joe will be stepping down from that position due to health reasons.  Joe has been the “behind the scene guy” who worked hard getting us donations at the Holiday time, set up the Holiday Party besides coordinating the visits of patients.  Thanks, Joe for all your hard work!! We couldn’t have done it without you!

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

 
February Newsletter:

February is National HEART month!  Friday, Feb 4th - Go Red for Women/ Wear Red Day

January’s Speaker:

Brent Shaum

, from Zee Medical, who is a certified AHA trainer, spoke to us about the changes on how to perform CPR. He spoke about the history on how the information was gathered to come up with the standards for CPR and AED’s (automatic external defibrillators). He also gave demonstrations on how defibs work and how anyone can now purchase a Phillips home defib. Most movie theaters, theaters and any location that has over 500 people in NY state must have a defib available for the public to use. Anyone wishing to take a course in CPR/AED please let us know via email/ or at our meeting. There would be a charge for this class.

March Dates:  Mar 9 - Ash Wednesday    Mar 13 - Daylight Savings Time Begins     Mar 17 - St Patricks’ Day   Mar 20 - First Day of Spring    Mar 20 - Mended Hearts Meeting

If you are a professional who would like to speak at one of our monthly meetings, we would love to hear from you, please contact John Dirr

February’s Guest Speaker:   Suzette Smookler, Nutritionist from Stony Brook Hospital, will speak about managing diabetes.    Our February meeting is on Sunday, Feb .20th at 1pm

 March Birthdays   Hope you all enjoy your Birthday!   Eileen Edrehi 3/6

March Surgeversaries

Anthony Russo 3/5/10       Sister Lucinde 3/9/10     Dom Costanza 3/19/06     Gary Bass 3/24/10      Anthony DeCondo 3/25/09

Visitation Report:   Joe Edrehi, Joel Wohlgemuth and Bob Barrett made visits to Stony Brook Hospital and they saw patients in the month of December. Thank you for your hard work and effort bringing comfort to these patients.

 GET WELL WISHES:  Please keep Eloise Mueller in your thoughts and prayers as she recovers from surgery.  Also please keep Frank Joos in your prayers as he passed away in January. Our condolences to his family

THIS MONTHS RECIPES:    Turkey Chili

2 lbs ground turkey 2 large onions chopped    3 cans(28oz ea) whole tomatoes, drained     3 can (15oz ea) beans (kidney chile, lima) drained   1can (15oz) tomato sauce 1can(4oz) chopped green chilies    ¼ cup chili powder 1 tablespoon ground cumin   ½ teaspoon salt ½ teaspoon pepper

Cook turkey and onions in 6qt Dutch oven over medium heat about 15 min stirring until turkey is no longer pink and onions are tender. Drain   Stir in remaining ingredients, breaking up tomatoes. Heat to boiling; reduce heat. Simmer uncovered 1 ¼ hrs.

This is for 12 servings so freeze some for another chilly day!

Calories -315, Fat 9g, Sodium 920 mg, carbs 42g, Protein 28g   Rinse canned items to reduce sodium, use low sodium salt and this will reduce the Sodium in the recipe   (Betty Crocker Soup & Crock Pot Meals) Jan 1999

10 Things You Should Know Following Your Open Heart Surgery

Have you recently had open heart surgery? Or, perhaps your surgery is looming, and you're thinking about what life will be like post-surgery.     As you already know, this is huge operation, and so the first few weeks after surgery are critical.

 Here are 10 things you should (and shouldn't) do after open heart surgery:

 #1 Your Incision     After open heart surgery, you will have an incision in the center of your chest. If the surgeon used a vein from your leg as a graft, you will also have an incision on your leg. Here are a few tips on incision care:   - Keep the incisions clean and dry    - Wash with a mild soap and warm water     - Pat dry, but don't rub     - Avoid using lotions or ointments    - Check your incisions daily to ensure they are healing properly                                                          You may be wondering what is normal, and what's not normal after surgery — normal findings for a healing incision include:    - Numbness around the incision     - Itching around the incision   - Scabbing     - Slight redness

Abnormal findings for a healing incision — these should be reported to your doctor:     - Increased tenderness at the incision site   Increased redness at the incision site  - Swelling around the incision site  - Drainage coming from the incision site    - Fever

#2 Medications    As always, it's important to take any prescribed medications exactly as your doctor instructs. If you think you are having a reaction to the medication, report this to your doctor right away, but do not stop taking your medications without letting them know first. 

#3 Sleep  It's very common to have trouble sleeping after open heart surgery. This may be the result of incision pain, or it may be caused by stress, or other factors relating to your surgery. Regardless, a good night's sleep helps with proper healing. 

Here are a few tips to help you get a good nights sleep:  - Take your pain medication half an hour to one hour before bedtime     - Avoid caffeine in the evenings     - Use several pillows to help you get as comfortable as possible    - Listen to some light music, if that helps you relax.    You should also try to get a nap/rest in the middle of the day for the first few weeks.

#4 Household chores       Your activity will be limited during the first few weeks.           You can do light household chores if you wish, but standing in one place for longer than 15 minutes isn't recommended. You also shouldn't vacuum or lift heavy items for the first few weeks — so, why not sit back and put your feet up for a change!

#5 Driving   You will need to let someone else drive you around for the first 4-6 weeks after your surgery. 

#6 Stress  Stress can cause your heart rate to increase, which may be dangerous. I know, it isn't always possible, but do try to avoid getting stressed during your recovery period. 

 #7 Mental health   It is common after heart surgery to feel sad or have low mood. These feelings should go away after the first few weeks — your friends and family are really important at these times.                But, if these feelings don't go away after a few weeks, visit your doctor for further advice.

 

#8 Diet  Your diet is vitally important now, more so than ever. Here are some tips to follow:   - Eat lots of fresh fruits and vegetables     - Increase your protein intake, in the form of lean meats and legumes, to promote healing    - Get some healthy fats into your diet by choosing olive oil, avocados, nuts, seeds, and oily fish        Drink plenty of water to stay hydrated

#9 Exercise  You may think exercise should be avoided after surgery, but it is very important. The best type of exercise you can do right now is to walk. Try to get out walking every day, then gradually increase the distance and the pace as you feel up to it.  Your doctor will tell you when other forms of exercise are safe to do. 

#10 Ask for help      While you may want to maintain your independence, asking for help is a good idea.

In the weeks following your open heart surgery it's completely normal to feel a little confused, so it may be a good idea to get someone to help with medications, remembering appointments, and housework or cooking. A friend or family member may even like to go walking with you for extra moral support.   While things may seem overwhelming at present, remember that with a little time, life will begin to get back to normal again — you will soon be able to enjoy all of your normal activities.   Of course, check with your doctor for specific instructions after your surgery.  This is a general outline, but every patient is different and you must follow your doctor’s guidelines.

 

FOR YOUR INFORMATION

”Get yer Hot Dogs here!!”    

             (Low Fat dogs, of course)

We will be having a fundraising event with the Long Island Ducks on Sunday, July 10th at Bethpage Park in Central Islip, the home of the Long Island Ducks.

The Long Island Ducks are playing the Somerset Patriots at 5:00pm.  We will be sitting together as a group and will have our group mentioned at the game on the Ducks scoreboard.

We can start selling tickets now. All money must be handed in by our meeting on May15th.  You will receive the tickets 4 weeks before the game to distribute to those who attending the game.  This is for anyone who LOVES baseball and wants to help Mended Hearts.

 

If you received this newsletter and are interested in purchasing tickets, please contact John Dirr at JohnFDirr@aol.com or by calling 631-338-2521between 7pm -9pm weekdays or on weekends 10am -4pm, preferably by email.

The tickets cost $13.00 each and a portion is going to Mended Hearts of Suffolk County.

 

-Stony Brook University Hospital offers a number of prevention and treatment programs for the community, including the following:
Arrythmia Detection and Sudden Death: (631) 444-1060
Cardiac Catheterization: (631) 444-8060
General Cardiology and Silent Heart Disease Program: (631) 444-1060
Noninvasive Tests, Stress, and Echocardiography: (631) 444-1060
Preventive Cardiology Center: (631) 444-1069

 

-A series of educational lectures on healthy hearts is being held at Brookhaven Hospital at 100 Hospital Rd, East Patchogue on Wednesdays at 6:00 pm.

 Call (631) 654-7240 for further information, Registration not required but suggested

 

-Good Samaritan Hospital has a series of community lectures about Nutrition, Coronary Artery Disease, PAD and Organ and Blood donation running the next few months.

Call (631) 376-4444 for more information and to register.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------

THANK YOU!

We wish to thank Melissa Donnelly for making this newsletter part of the discharge paperwork for cardiac patients at Stony Brook University Hospital and letting patients know of our support group. Thank you to all the nurses and staff at the hospitals across Suffolk County who are supporting Mended Hearts of Suffolk County.

 

 

 

 

January's Newsletter:

At our Decembers’ meeting our guest speaker was Dr. Mary Lynch, who is a psychologist for the Three Village School District, and has a private practice of her own.   Dr. Lynch spoke about how to identify if you are depressed and some of the ways to combat depressions through diet, exercise, and meditation besides using medications.  We went through a relaxation exercise at the meeting which was very interesting to participate in.  There also were some suggestions for books and websites to check out and how to contact your employment assisted programs through your healthcare services. You can find these on our web site under LINKS

February is National HEART month!

Feb 2 -    Groundhog Day

Feb 3 -    Chinese New Year

Feb 4 -    Go Red for Women/ Wear Red Day

Feb 14 - Valentine’s Day

Feb 20 – Mended Hearts Meeting

Feb 21 – President’s Day

 

February Birthdays

Hope you all enjoy your 29th Birthdays!

Anthony Russo 2/10   Kathy Schirmer 2/10  Joan Sheehan 2/25

February Surgeversaries

Bill Closter 2/18  Norman Scheff 2/8

New Members- December

Richard Skolnik

Welcome to Mended Hearts!

____________________________________

 

Visitation Report:

Joe Edrehi, Joel Wohlgemuth and Bob Barrett made 9 visits to Stony Brook Hospital and they saw   25   patients in the month of December.

Thank you for your hard work and effort bringing comfort to these patients.

 Get Well Wishes

 Continued “Best Wishes” to Alyssa Esposito and Ernst and Eloise Mueller as they recover.  Please keep them in your thoughts and prayers.

 

THIS MONTHS RECIPES:

 

CHICKEN PICCATA          Serves 4. 

 

1 tablespoon lemon juice 1/4 cup capers  1/2 cup chicken stock 1/4 cup flour 4 chicken cutlets 4 teaspoons olive oil

 

In small bowl, combine lemon juice, capers and chicken stock & set aside.  Put flour in shallow dish and coat chicken cutlets with flour. Heat oil in skillet over medium high heat.  Cook coated chicken until golden brown, about 3 or 5 minutes each side depending on thickness of the cutlets.  When browned, add lemon juice mixture, and heat until sauce starts to thicken, about 2 minutes. 

 Bon appetit!  Charlie and Betty Averna

 

8 Ways Caregivers Can Care for Themselves

More than 65 million Americans — 29 percent of the U.S. population — provide care to a loved one. While caregiving has its rewards, the emotional and physical strain of caring for someone with a chronic or terminal illness can take its toll, and those experiencing the most stress may be compromising their own health.                                                               1. Watch for stress, depression:  Do you feel tired most of the time, or overwhelmed and irritable? Are you gaining or losing weight, oversleeping, sleeping too little, or losing interest in activities you typically enjoy? These could be signs of depression and severe stress, and when they arise, mental health experts advise seeking professional help.              2. Let things go:  Forget about trying to be the “perfect” caregiver. Setting too high expectations of yourself only contributes to the stress you’re already likely feeling. Don’t make things harder on yourself by trying to do everything. When people offer assistance, respond with specific tasks they can do, such as shopping for groceries, running errands, or doing some household chores.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         3. Educate yourself: Learn as much as you can about your loved one’s condition and how to be a caregiver. You’re likely to be more effective and feel more positive about your efforts.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    4. Join a support group:  Being around people who understand what you are going through and who have information that can help you in your caregiver role can be a big asset. Support groups also are a way to be social and to offer and accept encouragement.                                                                                                                                                                             5. Try respite care: Short-term nursing homes, adult-care centers, day hospitals, and in-home respite programs all can help give you a break, even if it’s just for a few hours a day.    6. Find balance:  Two-thirds of today’s caregivers also work outside the home. How do you strike a balance between responsibilities? Share your work loads, ask human resources about assistance programs, and keep communication with your supervisor open. Also, ask your loved one’s physician to send your employer a letter explaining the situation.            7. Take care of yourself:  Try to eat well-balanced meals and exercise to maintain your own good health. Stress-management exercises like yoga and tai chi are particularly good. Doing something you enjoy — biking, swimming, dancing — for 20 minutes at least three times a week is especially important. When you’re feeling stressed and overwhelmed, take a meditation break by walking away to a quiet space and breathing deeply for a few minutes.                                                                                                                                                                8. Accept your feelings:  Caregiving unleashes many feelings, including guilt, anger, fear, resentment, and grief. It’s important to allow yourself these feelings, while not compromising the well-being of your loved one. Guilt is an especially common feeling among caregivers. Manage it by first identifying it and being compassionate with yourself. Cloudy moods, like cloudy days, come and go. “There’s no one way a caregiver should feel. When you give yourself permission to have any feeling, and recognize that your feelings don’t control your actions, your guilt will subside.”

We would like to take this time to acknowledge those businesses that donated to Mended Hearts this past year.  THANK YOU for your kind and generous donations.

THE GOOD STEER

2810 Middle Country Rd

Lake Grove, NY 11755      631-585-8212 

LA GROVA RESTAURANT

2799 Middle County Rd

Lake Grove, NY 11755   631-981-4940

 ISLAND CAR WASH

1830 Middle Country Rd

Centereach, NY    631-585-1066

 VOULAPITTA GREEK RESTAURANT

199 Centereach Mall, Centereach, NY

631-981-0049

 STS OIL CHANGE

525 Middle Country Rd

Selden, NY    631-696-0555

 MAMA’S

Walmart Mall

Centereach, NY    631-585-1498

 AROMA NAIL & SPA

632 Middle Country Rd

Selden, NY     631-696-2300

 BAGELS YOUR WAY

233 Middle Country Rd

Selden, NY   631-736-1178

 MIDDLE COUNTRY AUTO

1379 Middle Country Rd

Selden, NY   631-698-1550

 LA CASA PIZZA

219 Middle Country Rd

Selden, NY   631-698-2880

 PRESTANO BAKERY

806 Middle Country Rd

Selden, NY    631-698-2288

 NICK & GINA’S PIZZA

638 Middle Country Rd

Selden, NY   631-732-3845

 QUALITY PHARMACY

249 Middle Country Rd

Selden, NY    631-732-7373

 

 

December’s Speaker:

At our Decembers’ meeting our guest speaker was Dr. Mary Lynch, who is a psychologist for the Three Village School District, and has a private practice of her own. Dr. Lynch spoke about how to identify if you are depressed and some of the ways to combat depressions through diet, exercise, and meditation besides using medications. We went through a relaxation exercise at the meeting which was very interesting to participate in. There also were some suggestions for books and websites to check out and how to contact your employment assisted programs through your healthcare services. You can find these on our web site under LINKS

Januarys’ Guest Speaker: Brent Shaum – trainer; speaking about CPR and the new AHA procedures and info on Defibrillators on Sunday Januray 16th

 February Dates: February is National HEART month!

Feb 2 - Groundhog Day;  Feb 3 - Chinese New Year;  Feb 4 - Go Red for Women/ Wear Red Day;  Feb 14 - Valentine’s Day; Feb 20 – Mended Hearts Meeting; Feb 21 – President’s Day

February Birthdays :Hope you all enjoy your 29

th Birthdays!

Anthony Russo 2/10;  Kathy Schirmer 2/10;  Joan Sheehan 2/25;

February Surgeversaries :

Bill Closter 2/18;  Norman Scheff 2/8

New Members- December:   Richard Skolnik     Welcome to Mended Hearts!

Visitation Report:

Joe Edrehi, Joel Wohlegemuth and Bob Barrett made

9 visits to Stony Brook Hospital and they saw 25 patients in the month of December. Thank you for your hard work and effort bringing comfort to these patients.

Continued Best Wishes‖ to Alyssa Esposito and Ernst and Eloise Mueller as they recover. Please keep them in your thoughts and prayers.

THIS MONTHS RECIPES: CHICKEN PICCATA Serves 4.

1 tablespoon lemon juice;  1/4 cup capers;  1/2 cup chicken stock;  1/4 cup flour;  4 chicken cutlets;  4 teaspoons olive oil

In small bowl, combine lemon juice, capers and chicken stock & set aside. Put flour in shallow dish and coat chicken cutlets with flour. Heat oil in skillet over medium high heat. Cook coated chicken until golden brown, about 3 or 5 minutes each side depending on thickness of the cutlets. When browned, add lemon juice mixture, and heat until sauce starts to thicken, about 2 minutes.       Bon appetit! Charlie and Betty Averna

8 Ways Caregivers Can Care for Themselves

More than 65 million Americans — 29 percent of the U.S. population — provide care to a loved one. While caregiving has its rewards, the emotional and physical strain of caring for someone with a chronic or terminal illness can take its toll, and those experiencing the most stress may be compromising their own health.

1. Watch for stress, depression: Do you feel tired most of the time, or overwhelmed and irritable? Are you gaining or losing weight, oversleeping, sleeping too little, or losing interest in activities you typically enjoy? These could be signs of depression and severe stress, and when they arise, mental health experts advise seeking professional help.

2. Let things go: Forget about trying to be the "perfect" caregiver. Setting too high expectations of yourself only contributes to the stress you’re already likely feeling. Don’t make things harder on yourself by trying to do everything. When people offer assistance, respond with specific tasks they can do, such as shopping for groceries, running errands, or doing some household chores.

3. Educate yourself: Learn as much as you can about your loved one’s condition and how to be a caregiver. You’re likely to be more effective and feel more positive about your efforts.

4. Join a support group: Being around people who understand what you are going through and who have information that can help you in your caregiver role can be a big asset. Support groups also are a way to be social and to offer and accept encouragement.

5. Try respite care: Short-term nursing homes, adult-care centers, day hospitals, and in-home respite programs all can help give you a break, even if it’s just for a few hours a day.

6. Find balance: Two-thirds of today’s caregivers also work outside the home. How do you strike a balance between responsibilities? Share your work loads, ask human resources about assistance programs, and keep communication with your supervisor open. Also, ask your loved one’s physician to send your employer a letter explaining the situation.

7. Take care of yourself: Try to eat well-balanced meals and exercise to maintain your own good health. Stress-management exercises like yoga and tai chi are particularly good. Doing something you enjoy — biking, swimming, dancing — for 20 minutes at least three times a week is especially important. When you’re feeling stressed and overwhelmed, take a meditation break by walking away to a quiet space and breathing deeply for a few minutes.

8. Accept your feelings: Caregiving unleashes many feelings, including guilt, anger, fear, resentment, and grief. It’s important to allow yourself these feelings, while not compromising the well-being of your loved one. Guilt is an especially common feeling among caregivers. Manage it by first identifying it and being compassionate with yourself. Cloudy moods, like cloudy days, come and go. "There’s no one way a caregiver should feel. When you give yourself permission to have any feeling, and recognize  that your feelings don’t control your actions, your guilt will subside."

We would like to take this time to acknowledge those businesses that donated to

Mended Hearts
this past year. THANK YOU for your kind and generous donations.

THE GOOD STEER   2810 Middle Country Rd   Lake Grove, NY 11755 631-585-8212

LA GROVA RESTAURANT  2799 Middle County Rd   Lake Grove, NY 11755 631-981-4940

ISLAND CAR WASH   1830 Middle Country Rd   Centereach, NY 631-585-1066

VOULAPITTA GREEK RESTAURANT  199 Centereach Mall, Centereach, NY  631-981-0049

STS OIL CHANGE  525 Middle Country Rd  Selden, NY 631-696-0555

MAMA’S  Walmart Mall  Centereach, NY 631-585-1498

AROMA NAIL & SPA  632 Middle Country Rd  Selden, NY 631-696-2300

BAGELS YOUR WAY 233 Middle Country Rd  Selden, NY 631-736-1178

MIDDLE COUNTRY AUTO  1379 Middle Country Rd  Selden, NY 631-698-1550

LA CASA PIZZA  219 Middle Country Rd  Selden, NY 631-698-2880

PRESTANO BAKERY  806 Middle Country Rd  Selden, NY 631-698-2288

NICK & GINA’S PIZZA  638 Middle Country Rd  Selden, NY 631-732-3845

QUALITY PHARMACY  249 Middle Country Rd  Selden, NY 631-732-7373

Suffolk County Hospitals and Information #’s

Stony Brook University Hospital  East Loop Road, Stony Brook, NY 11794  631-444-4000  www.stonybrookmedicalcenter.org

John T Mather Memorial Hospital  75 North County Rd, Port Jefferson, NY 11777  631-473-1320  www.matherhospital.org

St. Charles Hospital  200 Belle Terre Road, Port Jefferson, NY 11777 631-474-6000  www.stcharles.org

Peconic Bay Medical Center  1300 Roanoke Ave, Riverhead, NY 11901  631-548-6000  www.peconicbaymedicalcenter.org

Southampton Hospital  240 Meeting House Lane, Southampton, NY 11968  631-726-8200  www.southamptonhospital.org

Southside Hospital  301 East Main Street, Bay Shore, NY 11706  631-968-3000  www.northshorelij.com/NSLIJ/Southside+Hospital

Good Samaritan Hospital  1000 Montauk Hwy, West Islip, NY 11795  631-376-4444  www.goodsamaritan.chsli.org

St Catherine of Siena Medical Center  50 Route 25A, Smithtown, NY 11787  631-862-3000  www.stcatherines.chsli.org

Huntington Hospital  270 Park Ave, Huntington, NY 11743  631-351-2000  www.hunthosp.org

Brookhaven Hospital  100 Hospital Road, East Patchogue NY 11772  631-654-7100  www.brookhavenhospital.org

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

December's Newsletter:
 

Novembers Speaker:

 On November 21st, we had Dr. Vincent Basilice and his entire staff, visited us and he spoke on the importance of eye care.  He stressed on the importance of regular eye care and how it relates to all parts of the body.  People with diabetes, high blood pressure and various other health issues have to be careful how it affects the eye,

Dr. Basilice explained that cornea transplants were the first transplants on humans, before kidneys, hearts and other transplants that are done today.

 Dr. Basilice’s team has won numerous awards. If you would like to contact Dr. Basilice, please contact him at 631-751-2020. His practice is at the Ophthalmic Center in East Setauket.  Please mention that you know him through his talk with Mended Hearts.

  

Speaker Topics:

 Over the next few months we will have guest speakers talking about the following topics:

 Women and Heart Disease

Diet and Nutrition

Dental Care and Your Heart

Cardiac Update with Dr. Rosengart of Stony Brook

University Hospital

 This Month: Dr. Mary Lynch, psychologist, will be speaking on Depression and Anxiety.

 Check our website for dates of the speakers.

             January Dates

 

Jan 1-     New Year’s Day

Jan 9-     Holiday Party

Jan 16 – Mended Hearts Meeting

Jan 17 – Martin Luther King Observance

January Birthdays

Daniel Moran  1/7

Sister Lucinde 1/16

Jack Cohen 1/29

Joe Hedgecock 1/29

Hope you all enjoy your 29th Birthdays!

         January Surgeversaries

Theresa Cinelli 1/10

Morton Abronowitz 1/6

Dan Tycko  1/17

       New Members- November

Alex Moskie

Barbara Leidner

David Suticevich

  Welcome to Mended Hearts!

           Visitation Report:

 Joe Edrehi, Joel Wohlegemuth and Bob Barrett

made 12 visits to Stony Brook Hospital and they saw 32 patients in the month of November.

Thank you for your hard work and effort bringing comfort to these patients.

 Get Well Wishes

Please keep Ernst and Eloise Muller in your thoughts and prayers at this time. We have sent them a Get Well card from the group.

 

THIS MONTHS RECIPES:

 

Betty & Charlie Averna’s Zucchini Bisque:

 2/3 cup chopped onions   

2 cups chopped zucchini (3 medium size)

1 ½ cups chicken stock

¼ teaspoon salt (optional)

¼ teaspoon curry powder

¼ cup plain non fat yogurt

 

1) Combine onions, zucchini and chicken stock in saucepan and bring to boil, the reduce heat and cook covered for 10 minutes

2) Transfer mixture to blender when cooler somewhat; add remaining ingredients and process until smooth. Heat and serve.  Double or triple recipe to keep on hand

 Winter Comfort Recipe:  Macaroni Beef Skillet

Serves 6

8oz uncooked tricolor rotini pasta

½ lb lean ground round Beef

1 Cup chopped Onion

3 cloves Garlic – minced

1 ½ teaspoons Italian herb seasoning

1 ½ teaspoons basil

1 6oz can low sodium tomato paste

1 Cup Water

1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce

¼ teaspoon reduced sodium salt

2 tablespoons grated Parmesan cheese

2 tablespoons finely chopped parsley

 

Cook pasta and set aside.  Place Beef, onion, garlic, herbs in a skillet. Cover and cook over medium heat, stirring occasionally 8-10 minutes

  In a small bowl, whisk together toamato paste, water, Worcestershire sauce, salt, cheese and parsley.  Add to skillet

Add pasta to skillet and heat thoroughly before serving.

 

Calories – 280 Total Fat – 6g   Cholesterol -29mg

Protein 17gm   Carbs 40gm    Sodium 178mg

Sat Fat 2gm   Polyunsaturated Fat – 1gm

Monounsaturated Fats -2gm

 Holiday Party

 

We will be having our Holiday Party on Sunday January 9th at 2pm at the Paradise Diner in Hauppauge at 579 Vets Hwy.

We will have a private room for our event.

Cost is $10 for members and $20 for non members. Family and friends are invited, but we need to have a total count by December 19th along with full payment.  Cash or checks with checks made out to “Mended Hearts”.

 2011 Heart Walk

 The American Heart Association has begun the 2011 Heart Walk campaign. The Heart Walk will be on Sunday September 25th at

JONES BEACH.

The Nassau and Suffolk County Walks will be combined into one Great Big

Long Island Heart Walk.

Combining the two counties’ walks into one walk will cut down on duplicate expenditures that reduced the amount of money that is desperately needed for research and development.

 Mended Hearts will still play a large and very important role with the Heart Walk as always.

This will give us an even greater stage to expand our group to more people on Long Island.

We will have our Team Group on line like this year and hopefully we will have even more people attend, donate and participate in the walk.  The web site is up, but we do not have our team page set up just yet.  The web site is

www.LongIslandHeartWalk.org

 Next year there will also be a 5K Run in addition to the Heart Walk, which should attract many running groups from across Long Island.

More information will be forthcoming over the next couple of month.

Stay Tuned to the Newsletter or check our website for more details about this event and the 5K Run/Walk at Martha Clara Vineyards on

May 22nd, 2011

 

What is a Heart Healthy Diet?

 A heart healthy diet is one that limits SODIUM, certain types of FAT and CHOLESTEROL.

This type of diet is recommended for:

 *People with any form of cardiovascular disease

 *People with risk factors for cardiovascular disease – high blood pressure, diabetes, etc

  * Anyone who wants to lower their risk of developing cardiovascular disease.

 

SODIUM –diets high in sodium can increase blood pressure and lead to edema (water retention)

You should consume no more than 2,300 mg of   sodium per day. Check with your doctor on what he/she wants to limit you to.

 

CHOLESTEROL- our bodies make cholesterol. It is found in animal products with the highest amount in fatty meat, egg yolks, whole milk, cheese, and shellfish.  You should limit your intake to less than 200 mg per day. There are two types of cholesterol:

LDL – low density lipoprotein – the BAD type. This tends to build up in your arteries Optimal levels should be less than 100. Over 130 becomes risky for heart disease.

HDL- high density lipoprotein- the GOOD type.

This type carries cholesterol away from you arteries and helps lower your risk of having a heart attack. You want your levels to be high – ideally greater than 60.  It is a risk if it less than 40. You can raise your good by easting olive oil, canola oil, avocados and nuts. PLUS – exercise!

 

FAT: even though fats should be limited due to their high coloric content, not all fats are bad. Some fats are quite healthy. Here are the 4 types of fats:

Monounsaturated Fat – found in oils and nuts – can decrease cholesterol levels while keeping your HDL levels high.

Polyunsaturated Fat – found in oils of sunflower, soybean, corn can decrease total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol.

Omega -3 fatty acids – those found in fatty fish – salmon, tuna, mackerel, sardines –can decrease the risk of arrhythmias, decrease triglyceride levels and slightly lower you BP.

Saturated Fats- limit this type found in animal products, fast food and a few vegetables. Examples- butter, lard, whole milk dairy, poultry skin. Vegetable fats- palm oil, coconut oil, cocoa butter.

“Trans” fats – margarine, vegetable shortening, fried foods 

These fats increase your LDL (bad) and decreases your HDL (good) cholesterol

 You should limit your total fat to less than 30% of your total calories. If you are on a 1800 calorie heart healthy diet, then this would mean 60g of fat or less per day.  Less than 7% of your calories should come from saturated fats- that is less than 14g of saturated fat per day

 

From the American Heart Association:

A reminder that on Feb. 4th is the National

Go Red for Women / Wear Red Day

____________________________________________

 

The Final Word - from Our President

 Hello everyone and Holiday Greetings,

 I would like to say thank you to everyone who comes to our meetings.  We had some very good speakers and topics this year.  I would like to encourage your participation because in doing so you never know how your story or kind words can impact a person.  At this time I want to reiterate the mended hearts motto:  IT'S GREAT TO BE ALIVE TO HELP OTHERS.  Always remember we are here to support and comfort anyone who comes through our doors.  

 Special thanks to:

Bob Barrett - Vice President

Larry Kofler - Treasurer

Joe Edrehi - Visiting Chair and his group

John Dirr - Director of Communications

Natalie - Secretary

Eileen, Terry, and Natalie - Telephone Squad

Jackie – Fundraising assistant

 

   In Your Service

 Fred Dicrescento

  President, Chapter 67

 

 ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

November, 2010

Welcome to the first edition of The Happy Hearts Newsletter.   The title of this newsletter comes from a name that was picked by Chapter # 67 years, and years ago.  There are other variations of this name associated with other chapters around the country, but we are THE Happy Hearts!

 

 We want to make this newsletter YOUR newsletter, so please take part in the information that is put into it.  We will need Reporters for the newsletter, so if you are interested in this, please let us know.  If there is a Lois Lane or a Jimmy Breslin inside of you, get your notepad out and get the info into the press room.   If you find interesting articles, or recipes, or anything that you think our members should know about, please submit them to us. 

 

 Since we want to hand the newsletter out at our monthly meetings, we will have to set a deadline for submitting any articles, recipes, dates of events, etc. so we have time to get it typed up and sent to the presses.  We can have both a hard copy to hand out at the meetings and also put this on our web site.

 

 We will want to list the birthdays for the month coming up among other things, so all of those who haven’t given us your birth date yet – we’re coming for ya!!  We won’t ask for the year, just the date!

 

Some other things we can publish are: birth announcements of children and grandchildren, notices of any member who is ill in case you want to send a card, items of interest for all parts of Suffolk, a list of our new members, or anything that you would like to see in our newsletter.

 

So, here we go, folks!  Let’s kick this into high gear and get the presses rolling!!!!!And most of all – let’s have some Happy Heart talk      

 

November  and  December  Birthdays:

 Ron Garguilo – 11/14                                           Richard Hart – 12/14

Millicent Tycko – 11/13                                        Norman Scheff – 12/16

Daniel Tycko – 11/14                                            Harold Martin – 12/31

 

Guest Speakers:

 October – Doreen Elitharp – spoke on Deep Vein Thrombosis

November – Dentist who will speak on Dental Care and Your Heart

December –Dr. Mary Lynch, psychologist, will speak on Anxiety and Depression

 

This Months Recipe:              Herbed Veggie Skillet

Serves 4; ½ cup per serving     (from Go Red for Women recipe collection)

 

2 teaspoons canola or corn oil                                             2 tablespoons water

8 oz. zucchini (sliced)                                                           1/8 teaspoon dried basil (crumbled)

¼ cup diced green bell pepper                                            1/8 teaspoon dried marjoram (crumbled)

¾ cup frozen whole kernel corn                                          1/8 teaspoon dried oregano (crumbled)

1/3 cup diced fresh tomato                                                   Pepper to taste

¼ cup sliced onion

 

In a large nonstick skillet, heat the oil over medium-high heat, swirling to coat the bottom. Cook the zucchini, onion and bell pepper until limp, stirring occasionally. Add the remaining ingredients except the pepper.  Cook, covered, for 5 minutes, or until zucchini is tender, adding more water if necessary. Season with pepper.

Calories 69, Total Fat 2.5g, Cholesterol 0g, Sodium 9 mg, Carbs 11g, Fiber 2g Sugar 3g, Protein 2 g

 

If anyone has a healthy Holiday recipe, whether dessert, side dish, or appetizer, please submit it by December 1st  for our December edition to John D.

 

Fundraising Ideas:  We have gotten some great ideas for fundraising. 

 Adam and Erica Ennis are looking into having a fundraising at a bowling alley for some time in Jan or Feb.  Great idea!

 

Bob and Maria Feinman have given us a contact to get our logo printed on items to sell.

 

I am contacting the Long Island Ducks about a fundraising day at the Ballpark this spring.

 

Give us your ideas for any fundraising that you can think of.  Nothing is too crazy if we can spread the word about Mended Hearts!!

  

New Members since September:

 

Anthony and Nancy Russo                                Harold Martin

Norman Scheff                                                    Adam & Erica Ennis

Eileen McGrath                                                  Daniel Moran

Bob & Maria Feinman                                       Joan Sheehan                               

Millicent and Danile Tycko                                Did I miss anybody??

Bill Closter

 

Hopefully our newsletter will g r o w each month as you, the members, start contributing your information and ideas to the next edition of The Happy Hearts Newsletter!   See you next month – our meeting is scheduled for December 19th at 1pm.


And as always, we thank Stony Brook University Hospital for supporting our group and giving us the space to hold our meetings and pay our parking fees.  THANK YOU!!

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

 
 
Comments