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Xander would like to thank every web site that posted. I would like to show recognition for all 150 sites so far, but there is just not enough room, I will post some of them.

ACED ITXander the Wonder Dog wins national award

AKC recognizes blind therapy pug with Award for Canine Excellence

Posted: Saturday, August 9, 2014 12:00 am

By SAMANTHA TIPLER H&N Staff Reporter

The American Kennel Club has recognized what many in the Klamath Basin already know. Xander the Wonder Dog is one amazing pug.

This week the AKC announced the five winners of the humane fund Awards for Canine Excellence, or ACE. Xander won the therapy dog category.

“This is outstanding, once in a lifetime,” said Rodney Beedy, who owns Xander with his wife, Marcie. “He’ll never get it ever again.”

Xander is in good company for the recognition. Other categories were companion dog (Boomer, who fought off a bear for his owner), service dog (Gander, the first mixed-breed dog to earn an ACE award), uniformed service K-9 (Bruno, who took a bullet in the line of duty and is now retired) and search and rescue dog (Patella, who led recovery efforts after Typhoon Haiyan in the Philippines).

In 2012 another Klamath Basin dog, Joy Akita that sniffed out her owner Terry Sharpe’s cancer, won the kennel club’s exemplary companion ACE award.

Rags to riches

Xander’s own story is no less remarkable.

An accident when Xander was young caused him to lose his eyesight and his eyes were removed. He was put up for adoption at the Klamath Animal Shelter, where the Beedies found and adopted him. They immediately saw Xander’s innate ability to give back and to help others and began training him as a therapy dog. Today Xander works with Klamath-Lake CARES and Hands and Words are Not for Hurting. He visits hospitals, nursing homes and schools, and appears at many parades and events in the community.

“It’s almost a rags-to-riches type of thing,” Rodney said.

Xander went from being blind and homeless to helping others and becoming an international celebrity. In 2013 he was named as one of Buzzfeed’s top 31 pugs of the year. The Herald and News published a story about Xander in May 2013, which was picked up by NPR, Ladies Home Journal, the Huffington Post and others.

“He has over 8,500 friends on Facebook. He’s constantly gaining more and more and more,” Rodney said. “He is popular on the Internet and across the world. It’s almost every country in the world has publicized him.”

Since his ACE award was announced, Xander is slated to have a story in the Oregonian and the Pet Partners therapy animal program magazine. The Beedies and Xander will fly to Orlando in December to receive the award. It will be both Marcie’s and Xander’s first time on an airplane.

Xander’s big heart

Even with all the attention, Xander is still a hardworking pug. Last year Marcie, who is diabetic, was in the hospital in January in a diabetic coma. Since she recovered, Rodney and Marcie saw Xander get anxious whenever Marcie’s blood sugar rose. Rodney is training Xander to be a service dog for Marcie, too.

Rodney said Xander’s natural ability to help others always shines through.

Recently at Double-C Dog Training, a young boy was playing with Xander. They played for a time, and when the boy was tired he lay down for a rest on the floor of the training area.

“Xander came up to him, touched him, gave him a kiss and sat down,” Rodney said.

Rodney said it was like Xander was saying “You’re safe. You’re OK. I’ll wait right here until you’re ready to play again.” Xander didn’t pounce on the boy or continue to rough-house.

“Once the boy said “OK, play again,” Xander was ready and up and loving and kissing him again,” Rodney said. “He allowed the child to take the initiative.”

Sometimes when working with adults Xander will get tired after a few hours. But not with children, Rodney said.

“Just to see him work with the kids is just amazing. All this other stuff is icing on the cake,” Rodney said, referring to the publicity and the awards. “Like his work with that one little boy, it was like, wow. This dog was made to do what he’s doing.”


http://caninechronicle.com/breaking-news/five-canine-heroes-honored-with-akc-humane-fund-awards-for-canine-excellence/

Five Canine Heroes Honored With AKC Humane Fund Awards For Canine Excellence

The AKC® Humane Fund announced today the winners of the 15th annual AKCHumane Fund Awards for Canine Excellence (ACE). These awards honor five inspirational dogs that have made significant contributions to their communities and truly exemplify the power of the human-canine bond. One award is presented in each of the following five categories: Exemplary Companion, Uniformed Service K-9, Search and Rescue, Service and Therapy dog. This year’s winners include a faithful companion that saved her owner from a bear, a heroic K-9 that took a bullet in the line of duty, an international search and rescue traveler, a blind therapy dog bringing comfort to abused children and ACE’s first mixed breed winner, a service dog to a U.S. veteran raising awareness of the profound impact service dogs can have on trauma survivors.

“Dogs impact our lives every day in immeasurable ways, and with so many wonderful ACE nomination stories, it’s a difficult choice to select only one recipient in each category,” said AKC Spokesperson Gina DiNardo. “These five dogs have gone above and beyond, touching the lives of individuals and communities across the country.  We’re thrilled to recognize their achievements with an ACE award.”

All of the ACE recipients will receive $1,000 to be awarded to a pet-related charity of their choice, a one year pet insurance policy from Pet Partners, Inc. and an engraved sterling silver medallion to be presented at the AKC/Eukanuba National Championship in Orlando, Florida on December 13, 2014.

This year’s ACE winners include:

Exemplary Companion Dog: “Boomer,” an Australian Shepherd owned by Connie Dilts of Smicksburg, Pennsylvania

It was like any other day when Connie Dilts embarked on her usual walk with her two Australian Shepherds, Boomer and Reina, except on this day Boomer would save her life.  On a remote road one mile from home, a bear charged at and violently attacked Connie. It wasn’t long until Boomer was upon the bear, keeping him away from Connie and ultimately forcing the bear to flee.  To be safe, Boomer chased the bear to ensure it didn’t return.  Boomer returned some time later, the only battle scar a scrape on her nose.

 








Therapy Dog: “Xander,” a Pug owned by Rodney and Marcie Beedy of Klamath Falls, Oregon

Xander the Pug had a tough start to life – he lost both of his eyes following an accident and was put up for adoption soon after.  But when the Beedy family met Xander, they saw something special in him and knew he could improve the lives of others.  The Beedys’ new dog Xander soon passed his AKC Canine Good Citizen test and became a certified therapy dog, visiting hospitals, nursing homes, schools and abused children.  Even without sight, Xander has an extraordinary ability to sense humans in need. His gentle, calm demeanor has provided unmatched comfort for so many.









Service Dog: “Gander,” a mixed-breed dog owned by Lon Hodge of Vernon Hills, Illinois

Gander was on doggy death row when a prison training program saved his life.  After graduation, Gander received additional training and became a service dog to veteran Lon Hodge, who suffers from PTSD and mobility issues as a result of his time in the service.  Lon credits Gander with saving his life, and now the duo spend their time raising awareness of veterans’ issues and the profound impact service dogs can have on trauma survivors. Gander is the first mixed-breed dog to win the ACE.






Uniformed Service K-9: K-9 “Bruno,” a German Shepherd Dog owned by Officer R.J. Young of the Anaheim Police Department in Anaheim, California

K-9 Officer Bruno spent his career sniffing out narcotics and criminals and protecting his human colleagues. But earlier this year, Bruno’s dedication was put to the test like never before. After locating a suspect who had allegedly opened fire on probation officers, Bruno was shot in the face in the line of duty.  The round shattered his jaw, damaged his lung, and lodged itself less than an inch from his heart.  Bruno, now retired, continues to heal and live a comfortable life at home with Officer Young and his family.








 

Search and Rescue Dog: K-9 “Patella,” a Labrador Retriever owned by Jim Houck of Ft. Collins, Colorado

K-9 Officer Patella is certified as a Human Remains Detection K-9 and has assisted countless cases across Colorado.  Last year, Patella and her handler Jim Houck responded to an international call, travelling 9,000 miles to the Philippines to lead recovery efforts after the destruction of Typhoon Haiyan.  Patella worked a total of 60 days in intense heat and humidity, searching miles of debris that were as deep as 20 feet and providing closure to hundreds of families.






Meet “Xander” The Blind Therapy Pug

Meet “Xander” The Blind Therapy Pug

This story of a rescue pug from Klamath Falls, Oregon is stealing our hearts! Despite having lost his sight, Xander's smiling face comforts and lifts peoples' spirit thanks to the companionship he offers. The amazing Xander has passed the A.K.C. Canine Good Citizen Test and is a certified Pet Partner's Therapy Dog.

 

On Xander's Facebook page, his owners Rodney & Marcie Beedy explain that his mission "is to stop violence" but "will comfort the young and old" until then. Because of his charming and loving personality, he often works with victims of child abuse and spousal abuse. 

 

 

"I began using my other senses, the love in my heart and my many blessings to brighten the days of everyone that I met," Xander writes on his own webpage. "He's amazing in that his blindness does not affect his ability to do his work," Rodney remarked, although the work that Xander accomplishes is pretty amazing in itself.

 

To the compassionate Pug and his rescuers Rodney & Marcie Beedy, you have won over our hearts. Thanks to the good work that you do! It means more than you'll ever know to those who see his smiling face. And now all we want to do is give Xander a big hug. We feel like he wouldn't mind it either.

 

If you're touched by Xander's story, help out the Klamath Animal Shelter and donate. Please support your local Animal Rescues as well. Help by donating your time, your home to a pet or donating money to assist with the health and care of our rescue animals.

 

Watch this interview Xander the blind pug with his owner and meet the cute pug himself. To view click here

 

Thanks for reading! Pugs and Kisses

Pug Fanatic


All images are copyright their respective owners. We thank our fellow pug lovers out there for the wonderful pictures used in this article!

Post by Ashley Marie
- See more at: http://www.pugfanatic.com/blog/view/meet-xander-the-blind-therapy-pug#sthash.oN6pdhQh.dpuf
Xander even got into a Hong Kong News paper. You can read and listen in Chineese. 50,000 shares
http://hk.apple.nextmedia.com/international/art/20140204/18614186


MailOnline - news, sport, celebrity, science and health stories

Blind Pug gets new lease of life bringing joy to sick children and the elderly (and look at the smile it puts on HIS face!)

  • Xander the pug lost his sight in an accident aged one
  • He was put up for adoption and taken home by shelter volunteers
  • He is now a therapy dog, visiting hospitals, schools and nursing homes

By SARA MALM

PUBLISHED: 09:03 EST, 2 February 2014 UPDATED: 11:56 EST, 2 February 2014

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A blind pug has found a new calling in life after taking up a role as a therapy dog.

Xander from Klamath Falls in Oregon, U.S., went blind in an accident when he was just one year old and was subsequently put up for adoption.

However, volunteers at Klamath Animal Shelter, fell for the pug, and decided to take Xander home with them.

Love is blind: Despite having lost his sight, Xander's smiling face is lighting up the lives of residents in Klamath Falls since becoming a therapy dog
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Love is blind: Despite having lost his sight, Xander's smiling face is lighting up the lives of residents in Klamath Falls since becoming a therapy dog

Smug pug: Clearly beaming with pride, Xander shows off his new certificate vest after qualifying as a therapy dog in Oregon, U.S.
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Smug pug: Clearly beaming with pride, Xander shows off his new certificate vest after qualifying as a therapy dog in Oregon, U.S.

Man's best friend: Xander wipes the tears from a little girl's cheeks during one of his therapy dog rounds in Klamath Falls
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Man's best friend: Xander wipes the tears from a little girl's cheeks during one of his therapy dog rounds in Klamath Falls

Marcie and Rodney Beedy say they soon realised their new dog’s ability to boost the spirits of those around him.

The Beedy’s decided to enrol Xander in the American Kennel Club's Canine Good Citizen program.

 


    Three weeks later, Xander became a certified Pet Partner's Therapy Dog  and now spends his days greeting young and old at the likes of hospitals, nursing homes, animal shelters and schools.

    Owner Marcie has to wear a bell around her trouser leg to keep the adorable Xander by her side as he spreads his love – despite not being able to see the people he meets.

    Spreading the joy: Proving that a disability is no reason to give up on your dreams, therapy pup Xander leaves a trail of smiles wherever he goes
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    Spreading the joy: Proving that a disability is no reason to give up on your dreams, therapy pup Xander leaves a trail of smiles wherever he goes

    New job: After taking Xander home, Marcie and Rodney Beedy  decided to enrol Xander in the American Kennel Club's Canine Good Citizen program
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    New job: After taking Xander home, Marcie and Rodney Beedy decided to enrol Xander in the American Kennel Club's Canine Good Citizen program

    Xander, a pug from Klamath Falls in Oregon, USA, became blind after he suffered an accident when he was one-year-old
    +10
    Xander
    +10

    Dapper dog: Xander dressed up in a pug-sized suit, left,  and in his threapy dog vest, right

    Lovepug: Xander's rounds includes visiting the sick in hospital or lonely elderly people in nursing homes
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    Lovepug: Xander's rounds includes visiting the sick in hospital or lonely elderly people in nursing homes

    Puggle cuddle: Xander is in his element as he is being petted by children during one of this therapy rounds
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    Puggle cuddle: Xander is in his element as he is being petted by children during one of this therapy rounds

    Xander - the peace dog: His Facebook states that his mission in life is to stop violence and that he will continue to comfort those old and young until he can no longer do so
    +10

    Xander - the peace dog: His Facebook states that his mission in life is to stop violence and that he will continue to comfort those old and young until he can no longer do so

    The pug has also started to receive a strong following on the web.

    His Facebook page - ‘Meet Xander’ - states that the dog’s mission in life is to stop violence and that he will continue to comfort those old and young until he can no longer do so.

    Rodney said: ‘I loved him - just his personality and everything.

    ‘I was saying I'll take this dog, he's going to make a fantastic therapy dog.

    ‘A lot of times he'll hear a child crying at an event and he's bolted several times, at least 500ft over to this child to comfort them.’



    Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2550425/Blind-pug-Xander-given-new-lease-life-therapy-dog-adoption.html#ixzz2thqXLHza 
    Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook

    Yahoo! News

    Trending Now


    Xander, the Blind Therapy Pug, Helps Humans Big and Small

    January 31, 2014 3:08 PM

    A disabled dog is finding ways to lift peoples' spirit thanks to the companionship he offers.

    Xander lost both of his eyes and developed breathing issues early in life following an accident. Soon after, the pug was given up for adoption at the Klamath Animal Shelter in Klamath Falls, Oregon. There, volunteers cared for Xander until Marcie and Rodney Beedy took him into their home.

    The Beedys saw potential for Xander to improve the lives of others around him. They enrolled the 1-year-old dog in the American Kennel Club’s Canine Good Citizen program. Rodney is a member of the Double C team.

    On Xander's official website, his owners explain part of the process.

    "Xander's first accomplishment was to pass Beginning obedience class with about 20 sighted dogs," the Beedys wrote. "Momma wore a bell attached to her pant leg to keep him by her side. It wasn't long after that he could just listen to her footsteps and heel beside her."

    Three weeks later, the blind pug earned his degree and became a certified Pet Partners Therapy Dog. In the role, he greets and visits with the young and old at hospitals, nursing homes, schools, and animal shelters.

    What Rodney saw in the pug that made him fit to be a therapy dog: "It mainly was his gentleness and his ability to adjust to the circumstances. If he was with one person, he would play. If it were another person, he would calm down nicely. He's very gentle with what he does."

    The Air Force veteran trains dogs for a living. Despite owning seven pugs and one Labrador, Rodney says, Xander is his first therapy dog.

    "I think he was born for this type of work," the proud owner continued. "He's pulled me aside when a child was crying over 500 feet away because he wants to go over and comfort the child."

    But when asked to recollect the most touching story of Xander bringing joy or ease to someone, Rodney remembers a particular hospital patient.

    "We got a call to go up to the hospital for this one lady who was terminally ill," Rodney said. "We didn't know how long she had. My wife agreed to go up there every day after work for an hour, hour and a half. [The patient] went and played with his face. Xander would kiss her whenever she would cough. [Her] last few days, my wife continued to go up there with Xander."

    The compassionate pug calmly stood by his newfound friend during her final days. She died a week and a half later.

    "He's amazing in that his blindness does not affect his ability to do his work," Rodney remarked, although the work that Xander accomplishes is pretty amazing in itself.

    THE PAW
    01/27/2014

    Xander, the blind dog that helps children and women victims of abuse

    For a head injury the eyes were removed, but the volunteers 
    have adopted and educated and is now a certified pet therapy dog

    The nose of the small Xander

    FULVIO CERUTTI (AGB)

    It's small, like all pugs. And I do not see anything, because it is blind from an early age. Yet the dog is able to move Xander problems as big as a mountain.Those blocks that are formed in children, the boulders they carry within women, the giant that has to live with the nightmares those who have suffered abuse and violence. 

     

    His story begins in Oregon, United States. Due to a bad head injury, veterinarians removed you are forced to both eyes. At the time the dog was only 10 months and his family decided to leave the shelter volunteers because did not want to keep it.  

     

    But just in Klamath Animal Shelter that the dog finds two angels Marcie and Rodney sees the potential in him and, despite his disability, educating adopt it until it becomes a certified pet therapy dog. So if life has reserved a difficult fate, Xander, for two years now, is able to give a smile to children who have been abused and women who have suffered domestic violence. 

     

    Xander has become a character on the Internet with a lot of website ( www.meetxander.com ) and Facebook page ( click here ) where "writes" in the first person and tells his story: "Even if I have taken my eyes, I see clearly kindness.Am I the only four-legged member of the Hospital Guilde and are always ready when you call me for the visits! I love spending time with someone who needs companionship and comfort or those who may feel alone. I can help also help children frightened by dogs to overcome their fear, and often accompany the group Hands and Words are Not for Hurting ® in school programs and tours, "says the little pug.  

    Xander, you can read on his Facebook page, also received a national recognition for bringing empathy and happiness in the lives of people in need and is underlined his four-legged mission: "to stop the violence ... will comfort children and adults up to that day " 

     


    Animalist.com is affiliated with Animal Planet. What a great honor! 

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    Xander the Therapy Pug

    Another story to add to the “dogs are amazing” file!

    Xander, a two-year-old Pug mix, ended up in an animal shelter in Oregon last year, but he was only there a few days when his outgoing, happy-go-lucky personality drew the attention of new owner Rodney Beedy. Xander has since gone on to have a stellar career as a therapy dog, working primarily with the victims of child and spousal abuse.

    A man named Rodney Beedy took him home once he noticed his wonderful and absolutely charming personality.

    The twist? Xander has no eyes and is completely blind! Still, he gets around well and loves being center of attention in crowds of children. He is drawn to comfort people whenever he hears crying.

    The photos of this happy dog working made us smile. Check out more of Xander’s story onViral Nova.

    Like this:

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    Follow “AKC Dog Lovers”

    Blind Pug, Xander Now a Therapy Dog

    YouTube Video


    Meet Xander, The Impossibly Cute Blind Service Pug That Helps Victims Of Child Abuse

    I think I’m going to faint.posted on January 17, 2014 at 6:10pm EST

    Ryan BroderickBuzzFeed Staf

    This is Xander. He’s almost two years old and he’s a service dog from Oregon. He’s also blind and unbelievably adorable.

    Last January, Xander was admitted to a local animal shelter. He was was adopted a few days later by Rodney Beedy.

    “I loved him,” Rodeny said of meeting Xander for the first time. “Just his personality and everything, I was saying ‘I take this dog, he’s going to make a fantastic therapy dog.”

    Rodney and his wife adopted Xander and officially had him certified as a service dog. Xander provides comfort to those victims of child and spousal abuse. That’s Xander visiting his momma in the hospital.

    Some other important facts about Xander: He wears the absolute heck out of a suit.

    Look at this dapper little dude.

    “A lot of times he’ll hear a child crying at an event and he’s bolted several times, at least 500 feet over to this child to comfort them,” Rodney said.

    Rodney stresses that Xander may be disabled, but he’s just like any dog — if not even more self-reliant. He joked that a lot of other dog owners are peeved at just how well-behaved Xander is.

    Right now Xander does all kinds of service projects, including Klamath Chapter Hands & Words Are Not For Hurting Project and Klamath Lake Cares.

    “He’s been in a crowd of kids, 20-30 kids at a time, and it doesn’t affect him at all,” Rodney said. “He just goes right in, with the flow, every day.”

    Rodney said that Xander is shockingly capable and follows him around without a leash, just following the sound of footsteps.

    Sometimes Xander works with bigger animals. He’s pretty chill about it.

    The kids Xander works with love curling and uncurling his pug tail. And a few days ago he got a big smooch from a baby right on the face and he played it off like a total professional.

    Xander, I love you so much that it actually physically hurts me.


    Xander the blind therapy dog comforts victims of abuse

    By Nadine Kalinauskas | Good News – Mon, 20 Jan, 2014
                                                                                                                                                  

    Xander works as a therapy dog in Oregon.

    When Xander was just a puppy, he suffered a head injury that resulted in him having both eyes removed. At 10 months old, his original owners left him at the Klamath Animal Shelter.

    Fortunately for Xander, Marcie and Rodney saw his potential. They adopted the calm, well-behaved dog and had him trained as a certified therapy dog.

    "I loved him," Rodney said of meeting Xander for the first time. "Just his personality and everything, I was saying, 'I take this dog, he's going to make a fantastic therapy dog."

    Xander the blind pug service dog

    Xander is two years old and is a service dog in Oregon. He's a therapy dog who comforts victims of child and spousal abuse.
    Xander now spends his days comforting victims of child and spousal abuse.

    "It was a big day for me when I passed the Pet Partners Therapy Dog test and became a Certi­fied Therapy Dog!" Xander "wrote" on his website. "I am the only four-footed member of the Hospital Guild and I'm always on call for visits! I love to spend time with anyone who needs com­panionship, comfort or may be feeling lonely. I also help kids who are afraid of dogs overcome their fear, and often accompany the Hands and Words are Not for Hurting® group on school programs and other outings. I was featured on the front page of the Herald and News, and received national recognition for bringing empa­thy and happiness to people for whom such things are in short supply. I can clear­ly see that unconditional love and kindness matter."

    [ Good News: Man lost on London Underground found after three days ]

    "A lot of times he’ll hear a child crying at an event and he's bolted several times, at least 500 feet over to this child to comfort them," Rodney told Buzzfeed of Xander's compassionate instincts.

    Last spring, Rodney told the Herald and News that, in an ideal world, Xander would be out of a job.

    "It would be great if Xander didn’t have a job," he said. "There would be no hurting kids out there. If Xander didn't have a job that would be wonderful. He would just play all the time."

    According to the pug's Facebook page, "Xander's mission is to stop violence … he will comfort the young and old till that day comes."





    Klamath Couty Commissioners Proclaimation


    Xander

    Steven Silton

    Xander

    Xander the blind therapy pug made an appearance at the annual Snowflake Parade.

    Posted: Friday, December 6, 2013 12:00 am

    By SAMANTHA TIPLER H&N Staff Reporter |0 comments

    Xander the blind pug’s big heart is world famous.

    On Thursday the website Buzzfeed named Xander the third most important pug of 2013.

    Though most of the list are gifs and memes (pictures) of silly pugs, Xander, who works as a therapy dog, is likely the only one of the 31 pugs listed who contributes to society.

    “He has three to four things a week he goes to,” said Rodney Beedy with his wife Marcie, who owns Xander. “I want to be in the background so he can do his work.”

    The Herald and News published a story May 24 about Xander the wonder dog. His story was picked up by NPR, Ladies Home Journal, the Huffington Post and others. He was on Purina One’s Facebook page where he garnered 2,800 likes in 24 hours, said Michael Kaibel, violence prevention specialist for Hands and Words are Not For Hurting, one of the many organizations Xander works with.

    Rodney said Xander is the first and only therapy dog to work with Klamath-Lake CARES (child abuse response and evaluation services) and the only four-legged member of the Sky Lakes Medical Center volunteer guild.

    “He has his own ID badge for the hospital to visit patients,” Rodney said. “Last Monday he visited two floors of patients.”

    This week he visited his first hospice patient and will likely visit more in the next few weeks.

    Rodney keeps Xander’s schedule straight with a calendar on the dog’s website,meetxander.com.

    Rodney and Marcie adopted Xander from the Klamath Animal Shelter in January. An accident caused him to lose his eyesight, and his eyes were removed, all before they adopted him. He took classes to become a therapy dog at Double C Dog Training and he lives with seven other pugs at the Beedys’ home.

    Even with all his fame, Xander remains the humble pug, ready to help anyone in need.

    At the Klamath Basin Potato Festival, Rodney said Xander pulled him 500 feet to a girl who was crying.

    “He wanted to comfort her,” Rodney said. “I picked him up and showed the little girl Xander. She stopped crying and started laughing and playing with Xander.”

    While he’s fielded interviews and seen Xander’s face on national media outlets, Rodney said seeing that little girl laugh is the greatest reward for himself and for the pug.

    “That part is so rewarding to see a crying child turn into smiles instantly when they see Xander,” Rodney said. “Seeing that is just so wonderful.”

    Xander on NBC News


    Xander and Marcie has an article in the Ladies Home Journal the Dec./Jan 2013 issue http://www.lhj.com/community/your-stories/16-women-made-world-happier-2013/?page=3 

    16 Women Who Made the World Happier This Year

    By Deborah Skolnik


    Xander hit the front page of the HERALD AND NEWS .

    WONDER DOGBlind pug helps as therapy dog in local community

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    Wonder dog

    H&N photo by Steven Silton

    Wonder dog

    Xander is a pug mix that, after losing both his eyes in an accident, works as a therapy dog. The blind pup made the Tiny Hopefuls Daycare erupt in laughter as everyone wanted to feed him a treat.

    To contact the shelter

    Website: klamathanimalshelter.com

    Facebook:facebook.com/KlamathHumaneSociety

    Location: 4240 Washburn Way, Klamath Falls

    Hours: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Monday through Saturday

    Phone: 541-884-7387

    What to do if you suspect an animal is being abused

    If it is a dog, cat or small animal, contact Klamath County Animal Control at 541-882-1279.

    Animals and abuse

    Michael Kaibel, violence prevention specialist with Hands and Words are not for Hurting, said violence against animals can be part of the family violence system.

    He hopes Xander can help get the message out that animals are part of the family, and should be included when victims seek help.

    “Batterers use the animal to control the families,” Kaibel said. “ ‘Do what I say or I’ll kill your kitten.’ ”

    He said two-thirds of women in shelters report an animal was tortured or killed as a way for a batterer to control them. He said three-fourths say an animal was tortured or killed in front of children. Child abusers will target animals as a way to force a child into an act and as a way to force them to keep a secret, he said.

    “It’s another layer on top of domestic violence,” he said. “For many years it has been our approach to reduce child abuse by addressing the whole family abuse system: child abuse, domestic violence and sexual violence, elder abuse and animal abuse.”

    Having the ability to take an animal to a shelter with the rest of the family gives the victims something to take care of and think outside themselves.

    “It’s a win-win,” he said. “The animal becomes part of the healing process.”

    Posted: Friday, May 24, 2013 12:00 am

    By SAMANTHA TIPLER H&N Staff Reporter |0 comments

    Xander the pug doesn’t have eyes, but he has a huge heart.

    The proud pup is working to make people happier as a therapy dog helping organizations like Klamath-Lake CARES (child abuse response and evaluation services) and Hands and Words are not for Hurting.

    Xander put his skills on display Tuesday, visiting Tiny Hopefuls Daycare with Hands and Words are not for Hurting. Surrounded by a ring of preschoolers, Xander welcomed hands stroking his back and head, even gently pulling on his tail to see it curl back up. Xander didn’t flinch at the peals of laughter. He didn’t get anxious in the crowd. For him, it was business as usual.

    “If I was blind and in a crowd of people on top of me I would be freaking out,” Rodney Beedy, who owns Xander with his wife, Marcie, said. “He has no qualms whatsoever. He has a good stable temperament.”

    Rodney and Marcie adopted Xander from the Klamath Animal Shelter in January. He is now a little more than a year old. They don’t know what happened to his eyes, only that there was an accident and the eyes had to be removed. Xander also has problems breathing through his nose and instead breathes mostly through his mouth. Every once in a while he lets out a big gasp through his mouth, vibrating his lips. Some people think he’s growling, but Rodney said it’s more like the sound a horse makes.

    “He’s just another dog,” Rodney said. “He still wants to play and do everything a normal dog does.”

    “He uses the doggie door like the rest of them,” Marcie added. At home the Beedys have seven other pugs.

    When they decided to adopt Xander, Rodney and Marcie knew he would be a good therapy dog.

    “This would be perfect for a therapy dog because of the way his attitude was: how calm he was but he still had a good outgoingness,” Rodney said.

    Xander took some basic obedience classes at Double-C dog training and took a few tests to see how he would react to people who are injured.

    In one of the tests a woman knelt down and started groaning as if she was injured and in pain.

    “Xander tilted his head, pulled Marcie and started giving her kisses,” Rodney recalled.

    Xander also has been on hand at the animal shelter to help children who are afraid of dogs.

    “One girl was crying, so I went and got Xander,” Rodney said. “The girl’s empathy went to him and she totally forgot about everything else. She started laughing and playing with Xander. It was amazing how well he did that.”

    Now Xander struts while wearing his therapy dog vests. One of his vests has the Hands and Words are not for Hurting patch, too. He is available to help children who have been abused by being their buddy, visit nursing homes, or help get out anti-violence messages with organizations like the Hands group.

    Rodney said in an ideal world no one would be in pain and no one would need Xander’s help.

    “It would be great if Xander didn’t have a job,” he said. “There would be no hurting kids out there. If Xander didn’t have a job that would be wonderful. He would just play all the time.”

    But until children aren’t hurting any more, he’s going to be there.


    NPR picked up the Herald and News article and ran with it and reached about 976 affiliate stations, which gets about 26 million viewers a week. 

    Little Dog Does A Big Job In Oregon

    May 28, 2013 4:37 PM
    Xander, a pug mix, lost both his eyes in an accident. He now works as a therapy dog, and visits groups such as this class at a daycare center.

    Xander, a pug mix, lost both his eyes in an accident. He now works as a therapy dog, and visits groups such as this class at a daycare center.

    Steven Silton/Herald and News

    He can't see, and he's not very big — but as dogs go, Xander the pug is having a big impact on his community in Klamath Falls, Oregon. The blind pup has even made the front page of the local paper, for bringing empathy and happiness to people for whom such things are in short supply.

    At only a bit more than one year old, Xander hasn't had an easy life. An accident required surgery to remove his eyes, and he sometimes has trouble breathing. But after he was adopted from an animal shelter in January, things started to turn around for Xander, as Samantha Tipler reports for Klamath Falls' The Herald and News.

    He was adopted by Marcie and Rodney Beedy, joining the seven other pugs at their home. They say they knew Xander would do well as a therapy dog — something Tipler saw proof of, as a class of preschoolers thronged around the dog to pet him and give his curly tail a gentle tug.

    "Xander didn't flinch at the peals of laughter," Tipler writes. "He didn't get anxious in the crowd. For him, it was business as usual."

    The dog now spends time with anyone who needs companionship, from children who have been abused to nursing home residents who may be feeling lonely. He also helps kids who are afraid of dogs cope with their fear, and appears for the Oregon-based anti-violence group the Hands and Words are Not for Hurting Project.

    "If I was blind and in a crowd of people on top of me I would be freaking out," Rodney Beedy tells Tipler. "He has no qualms whatsoever. He has a good stable temperament."


       The next day THE HUFFING POST called me and did an interview and wrote this article. Xander The Blind Pug Warms Hearts As Therapy Dog.

    Xander The Blind Pug Warms Hearts As Therapy Dog

    The Huffington Post Canada  |  By Ron Nurwisah Posted: 05/29/2013 4:51 pm EDT  |  Updated: 05/29/2013 4:51 pm EDT

    Share on Google+
    Xander Blind Pug Therapy Dog

    Xander, a blind pug who lives in Oregon, might just be the most inspirational dog you'll meet. The one-year-old pug, who lost his eyes in an accident, has been raising spirits as a therapy dog.

    Rodney Beedy, who adopted Xander in January, said that he and the people at the Klamath Animal Shelter spotted the pug's potential almost right away. "'He'd make a really good therapy dog. Look at his temperament', they told me," Rodney told the Huffington Post.

    Rodney, who owns seven other pugs, said that he wasn't sure if he could handle another dog but after talking it over with his wife, Marcie, and showing her the dog it was an easy sell. "She just fell in love with him," Rodney added.

    One of the groups that Xander has been working with is Klamath Lake Cares, a group that helps children who have suffered abuse.

    "We're bringing Xander in to let him comfort them before they start in on the investigation or a doctor sees them," Rodney explains.

    He also does work, visits to daycares and schools, with the local chapter of the Hands & Words Are Not For Hurting Project.

    “If I was blind and in a crowd of people on top of me I would be freaking out. He has no qualms whatsoever. He has a good stable temperament, ” Rodney explained to the Herald and News, a local paper in Klamath Falls.

    And it seems that Xander isn't just good with kids. Rodney recalls a recent visit to a retirement home where Xander sat with a woman who was recuperating. "He was laying on the bed and she was coughing. If you give a dog a kiss your whole face will be full of slobber. He just has this way of giving you a little kiss. Kinda like telling you that everything is going to be fine," he said.

    At home, Rodney points out that Xander is just like any of his other dogs. "He doesn't act like a dog that has no sight. He runs around here and does different things just like a sighted dog. He goes in and out of the doggie door. He figured that one out in one night," he explained

    Salt Lake, Utah Station picked it up ran it on all their stations.

    Blind pug spends days comforting abused children
    By Celeste Tholen Rosenlof
    May 29th, 2013 @ 10:38am
    519f1810d3988.image.jpg

    KLAMATH FALLS, Ore. — After meeting Xander the blind pug, you might look on your situation with a little more optimism.

    That is the purpose Rodney and Marcie Beedy hope Xander fills for people. The year-old pug is missing his eyes and has difficulty breathing through his nose after an accident, the details of which they are unsure. They adopted him from an animal shelter in January, adding him to the pack of six other pugs in their home.

    The couple said they knew even-tempered Xander would make a good therapy dog because people could empathize with him.

    "This would be perfect for a therapy dog because of the way his attitude was: how calm he was but he still had a good outgoingness," Rodney told Herald and News.

    They take Xander around Klamath Falls, Oreg., to animal shelters, nursing homes, safe houses for abused children, and daycares to work. Kids play with him, people cuddle him and he comforts them.

    "One girl (at the animal shelter) was crying, so I went and got Xander. The girl's empathy went to him and she totally forgot about everything else," Rodney said. "She started laughing and playing with Xander. It was amazing how well he did that."

    And as long as people need him, the Beedys say he will be available.

    "It would be great if Xander didn't have a job," he said. "There would be no hurting kids out there. If Xander didn't have a job that would be wonderful. He would just play all the time."

    Top image: Herald and News


    Read more at http://www.ksl.com/?nid=1010&sid=25374385#ifdcC7of3DUol6WH.99



    Purina One even post Xander on their FaceBook page.

    Purina ONE · 676,853 like this
    June 13 at 5:30am · 
    • Xander, this little pug, may be blind, but that doesn't stop him from listening to his instincts - for Xander, that means offering his love and affection to those in need as a therapy dog.http://n.pr/17ovsOy

      Dogs' instincts to comfort humans are pretty amazing - that's why they're one of our ingredients for good. #IngredientsforGood

      Like this post if you support therapy dogs




        After that it has been a world wing of articles around the web. All you have to do is Google (Xander therapy dog) and you get about 11 pages of listings. I'm so proud of this dog and how he works with Children and adults alike.

          
    Klamath Animal Shelter
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