Mayfair Magazine Scans

    mayfair magazine
  • Mayfair is a British adult magazine for men. Founded in 1965, it was designed as a response to U.S. magazines such as Playboy and Penthouse, which had recently launched in the UK. For many years it claimed the largest distribution of any men's magazine in the UK.
    scans
  • Cause (a surface, object, or part of the body) to be traversed by a detector or an electromagnetic beam
  • (scan) examine minutely or intensely; "the surgeon scanned the X-ray"
  • Look quickly but not very thoroughly through (a document or other text) in order to identify relevant information
  • (scan) the act of scanning; systematic examination of a prescribed region; "he made a thorough scan of the beach with his binoculars"
  • Look at all parts of (something) carefully in order to detect some feature
  • (scan) an image produced by scanning; "he analyzed the brain scan"; "you could see the tumor in the CAT scan"
mayfair magazine scans
mayfair magazine scans - Film Scan
Film Scan and Save
Film Scan and Save
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Bobby Henrey sits on a camera crane and chats with Carol Reed on the set of “The Fallen Idol” at Shepperton Studios in 1947 (see contemporary magazine article transcribed below).
Bobby Henrey sits on a camera crane and chats with Carol Reed on the set of “The Fallen Idol” at Shepperton Studios in 1947 (see contemporary magazine article transcribed below).
PLEASE NOTE: The following article was published some months before the release of the film and before its release title was changed to “The Fallen Idol.” Leader magazine, centre pages 14 and 15, Saturday, April 10th, 1948. BRITISH FILMS FIND A BOY STAR by John Barber. Bobby Henrey in “The Lost Illusion” got the job when someone saw his face on a book-jacket. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- The French Embassy set seen in the film cost ?3,500 to build and ?100 a week to maintain. --------------------------------------------------------------------------------- “With children, it is much the same as with grown-ups. To be any good to a director, an actor or actress must either be wonderful, or know absolutely nothing about acting. A little knowledge – that’s what is bad! If a woman says to a child: ‘What have you got in your pocket?’ and the child is not trying to act, he will show in his face that loveable and awkward look the audience will appreciate”. So says Carol Reed and, when he came to cast the chief part in ‘The Lost Illusion’, a boy of eight, he did not go to one of the usual child-actor academies. He welcomed the idea when Sir Alexander Korda’s casting chief suggested Bobby Henrey for no other reason than that he liked the little boy’s picture on a book-jacket. Bobby’s father is English, but his mother is French. He was born near Caen but escaped to London when Paris fell in 1940 and was pushed around Shepherd Market in Piccadilly in his French pram during the Battle of Britain. His first laugh was to see a house demolished by a bomb. He learned to walk in Mayfair and was so fascinated by a Victorian toy theatre, his mother said: “You may grow up to be an actor!” She is writing a book about his experiences. When Korda’s invitation arrived, Bobby was living on his grandmother’s Normandy farm. He flew to London for a screen test, meeting Carol Reed at Korda’s Hyde Park H.Q. beneath the bust of Merle Oberon. The director liked everything about Bobby except a bruised black fingernail. “Don’t let him lose his accent”, Reed told his mother, “don’t let him play with any more hammers and, whatever you do, don’t let him grow any bigger”. THE PARENT’S HESITATION His parents disagreed over whether to accept the Korda contract. Unlike a shrewd French-woman, his mother murmured that his character might be spoiled. Perhaps he had better stay and watch the cider being made in Normandy? His father was more realistic. “I don’t think we can lightly turn down money which could help start him in a career.” The money was certainly attractive. Bobby was to get ?1,000 down, free of tax, and after ten weeks, ?100 a week. He and his mother were to be fed and housed at the studios and provided with transport. The child was to have a governess all the time he was working. Bobby’s first job as a film actor was to run across Belgrave Square dodging the traffic. In the story, he is an ambassador’s son, and so for the Embassy the film people picked out a building belonging to the British Red Cross and St. John Organisation, who were glad to lend it in return for having its exterior painted and its broken windows replaced. During the shooting of these scenes, Bobby lived in a yellow and green caravan in the gardens of the square and learned to call Michele Morgan and Ralph Richardson by their first names. Miss Morgan, he learned, was herself the mother of a boy of three and had a brother and sister still at school. Sir Ralph, who shared his caravan, would doze with his hands joined over his waistcoat, his collar and tie hung up on a peg, and a volume of Trollope on the table in front of him. Even more exciting for the child were the scenes shot inside London Zoo. While Carol Reed supervised the meals of the sea-lions, Bobby learned how to ride on a dromedary. At the end of their first day, Sir Ralph called the boy into the caravan. “Bobby, would you like to come and see my mouse?” On his dressing table stood a green cage with sand in the bottom. “Take care. It’s still rather fierce, but I’m going to tame it.” The great actor was devoted to livestock: he had even asked if they would give him the snake Bobby had to play with during the film after it was all over. The child was taken next to the sound recording studio, where his voice was added to the silent open air sequences. He had to lean over a chair and call out “Papa! Papa! Au revoir, Papa!” After the first attempt – “That sounded very good, Bobby. But remember that the first time you shout, the ambassador doesn’t look up, so make your second ‘Papa’ more urgent. Do you understand?” A technician says: “His shoes are squeaking against the back of the chair. I think we had better take them off.” Carol Reed explains again how he wants it done and again, Bobby turns white and feels ashamed when his mistakes are made clear to him. The director says quickly: “Splendid, Bobby, splendid! That’s very good indeed. But
Mini ad- Mayfair
Mini ad- Mayfair
Post for fun. Scanned image from Evo Malaysia / Top Gear magazine. The brown Mini is really nice!
mayfair magazine scans