Ordinary and Partial Differential Equations

Course Description and Grading Breakdown
A partial differential equation (PDE) is a differential equation that contains unknown multivariable functions and their partial derivatives. They are used to describe a wide variety of phenomena such as sound, heat, electrostatics, electrodynamics, fluid flow, or elasticity.

In this course, we will discuss three important PDEs in detail: the Laplace equation, the heat equation and the wave equation. We will learn various techniques for finding explicit solutions of these PDEs. We will introduce distributions and discuss the notion of a 'fundamental solution'. We will also introduce Sobolev spaces, investigate their properties and use them to solve general second order elliptic equations.

The course will be offered Pass-Fail.


Course Meeting Time and Location
Tuesday and Thursday
9:00 - 10:25 am
103 Downs Laboratory of Physics (DWN)

Course Instructor Contact Information and Office Hours
210-2 Math Building (Building 15)

Course Schedule and Textbook

 DateTopic 
  
  


Course Policies
Late work - 


Assignments
 Date PostedAssignment Due Date 
   
   


Midterm and Final Exam


Collaboration Table
 HomeworkExams
You may consult:  
Course textbook (including answers in the back)YESYES
Other booksYESNO
Solution manualsNONO
InternetYESNO
Your notes (taken in class)YESYES
Class notes of othersYESNO
Your hand copies of class notes of othersYESYES
Photocopies of class notes of othersYESNO
Electronic copies of class notes of othersYESNO
Course handoutsYESYES
Your returned homework / examsYESYES
Solutions to homework / exams (posted on webpage)YESYES
Homework / exams of previous yearsNONO
Solutions to homework / exams of previous yearsNONO
Emails from TAsYESNO
You may:

Discuss problems with othersYESNO
Look at communal materials while writing up solutionsYESNO
Look at individual written work of othersNONO
Post about problems onlineNONO
For computational aids, you may use:

CalculatorsYES*NO
ComputersYES*NO

* You may use a computer or calculator while doing the homework, but may not refer to this as justification for your work.  For example, "by Mathematica" is not an acceptable justification for deriving one equation from another.  Also, since computers and calculators will not be allowed on the exams, it's best not to get too dependent on them.