Combinatorial Analysis

Course Description, Grading Breakdown and Course Policies
Math 121a is a standard introductory courses on combinatorics, covering structural combinatorics (finite structures, especially graphs) and enumerative combinatorics (counting, including algebraic methods).

The grade will be based entirely on homework sets due roughly every other week (most likely four over the course of the term), with no exams. Students are allowed one free extension, to be used by sending an e-mail to the professor.  This free extension will last one week, except that if there is a homework set due the last week of term, that extension will at most last until the day before finals.  No further extensions will be granted without a recommendation from the relevant Dean to do so.

Collaboration is encouraged, to the extent of figuring out how to approach problems; each student is of course responsible for understanding the solution and writing it up in their own words.  (Also see table below.)


Course Meeting Time and Location
Lectures
Monday, Wednesday and Friday
2:00 - 2:55 pm
122 Math Building (Building 15)

Course Instructor Contact Information and Office Hours
219 Math Building (Building 15)

Course Schedule and Textbook
A Course In Combinatics
J.H. van Lint and R.M. Wilson
2nd Edition
ISBN-13: 978-0521006019

 DateTopic 
  
  


Assignments
 Date PostedAssignment Due Date 
   
   


Collaboration Table

 

Homework

You may consult:

 

Course textbook (including answers in the back)

YES

Other books

YES

Solution manuals

NO

Internet

YES

Your notes (taken in class)

YES

Class notes of others

YES

Your hand copies of class notes of others

YES

Photocopies of class notes of others

YES

Electronic copies of class notes of others

YES

Course handouts

YES

Your returned homework / exams

YES

Solutions to homework / exams (posted on webpage)

YES

Homework / exams of previous years

NO

Solutions to homework / exams of previous years

NO

Emails from TAs

YES

You may:

Discuss problems with others

YES

Look at communal materials while writing up solutions

YES

Look at individual written work of others

NO

Post about problems online

NO

For computational aids, you may use:

Calculators

YES*

Computers

YES*

* You may use a computer or calculator while doing the homework, but may not refer to this as justification for your work.  For example, "by Mathematica" is not an acceptable justification for deriving one equation from another.  Also, since computers and calculators will not be allowed on the exams, it's best not to get too dependent on them.