Apa Khabar Orang Kampung (Village People Radio Show)


(Malaysia/2007/72min) 

FULL ENGLISH DIALOGUE LIST:
“VILLAGE PEOPLE RADIO SHOW”


AWIE:
(IN THAI)
My name is Awie
I live in the 12th Chulabhorn Development Village
I go to the 12th Chulabhorn Development school
In school I learn to read and write
Today I saw a snake.
I like to play games.
I like chickens.
(IN MALAY)
Done!


OPENING CREDITS OVER THE SONG “APA KHABAR ORANG KAMPUNG”, by SUDIRMAN


INTERVIEWER: -
Can you tell us a bit about…?

PAK KASSIM:
About my history?
But in brief. It’s not complete.
I was born in 1920.
We were still Malaya.
I was born in Bangau Parit village near Temerloh, Pahang. 
I attended a Malay school until Year 6.
I was already being groomed to be a tutor.
But then my mother passed away.
When she died,  I was not the same.
I didn’t want to study anymore.
When I left school…
this was under the British…
I joined the volunteer army.
And when the Japanese invaded Malaya, I took part in battle…
Together with the British to defend Malaya in the north.
But we failed.
The whites were defeated.
They retreated to the south.
The whites wanted to take me to Singapore.
I refused. I ran back to my village.
From 1941 Japan ruled Malaya.
The village chief wanted to send me to Burma with the Japanese soldiers.
I knew a bit about it.
The Japanese were building a railway in Burma.
Many people who were sent there died.
Some tried to escape.
The others got sick.
That’s the Japanese for you.
I registered to join the Japanese police instead.

RADIO PLAY:
(IN THAI)

KING TONG AND HIS PREGNANT WIFE QUEEN CHALIDA ARE WALKING WITH THEIR VISITING FRIEND KING PANU

PANU
I HAVE BEEN HERE NINE MONTHS AND IT IS TIME FOR ME TO LEAVE. THANK YOU SO MUCH FOR YOUR HOSPITALITY.
   
TONG
PLEASE STAY FOR A WHILE LONGER!

PANU
I FEAR I WILL OUTSTAY MY WELCOME. FAREWELL MY FRIEND.

TONG
TONGUE-TIED, MY QUEEN? SPEAK!

CHALIDA
I SHALL KEEP YOU AS A PRISONER! I SHALL ASK YOU ABOUT THE TIME YOU AND MY HUSBAND WERE YOUNG. YOU WERE PRETTY BOYS THEN?

PANU
OH YES. WE WISHED TO BE BOYS TOGETHER FOREVER.

TONG
IS HE PERSUADED YET?

CHALIDA
HE WILL STAY, MY LORD.

TONG
AT MY REQUEST HE WOULD NOT. BUT YOU SPOKE WELL.

CHALIDA
I AM BLESSED WITH A TALENT FOR THAT.

TONG
(ASIDE) TOO HOT, TOO HOT! MY QUEEN SEEMS VERY FRIENDLY WITH HIM.
LOOK HOW THEY SMILE AT EACH OTHER. IS THERE SOMETHING I SHOULD KNOW?

PAK KASSIM:
When working with the Japanese, I was told to capture people.
I worked in the Japanese military police for 3 years.
Then the Japanese surrendered.
By that time, I had come into conflict with the Chinese in the country during the Japanese occupation.
So I ran to Singapore.
From Singapore I tried to escape to Indonesia.
But I didn’t succeed.
I returned to my village.
The Japanese surrendered and the whites returned.
A couple of months later the whites caught me.
 Accused me of being a Japanese collaborator.
Some people made claims that when I worked for the Japanese…
I had beaten and slashed people and so on.
The whites took me to court.
But the British back then had a grudge against me.
He went “Pow!”
The police chief of Temerloh, named Day.
He went “Pow!” on the table.
“Why did you work for the Japanese?”
I became angry and went “Pow!” back.
I said, “Why did you run?”
“Why did the whites run away?
“When you whites ran away I worked with the Japanese.
“Now you arrest me.
This is unfair.”
Of course this upset them.
One year in prison.
I said “Fine! Send me to prison.”
In Taiping jail I learned a bit of English.
After a year I got out.
In 1946 I started getting involved with politics.
I was influenced by the Malayan Communist Party…
And took part in nonviolent anti-British activities until 1948.
In June the British declared a state of Emergency.
The British wanted to capture all anti-British elements in one fell swoop.
Many young men and women were targeted for arrest.
To evade arrest you had only one option:
Retreat into the jungle.
I left my family to live underground in the jungle.
I didn’t fully understand.
I was a normal member, not in the Central Committee.
I just knew I was in an anti-British organization.
But I didn’t know who the leaders were.
It was only in the jungle that I knew I was in the Communist Party.
I had some war skills.
I was appointed military leader of my unit.
I taught them about weapons, military drills…
Strategies of war.
Soon after, I was called up by the Party.
I met the top leaders like Abdullah CD and Rashid Maidin.
21 people, including me...
We were taken to Lubuk Kawah to set up the 10th Regiment.
Headed by Abdullah CD.
The surrounding villagers, Chinese and Malays, showed their support by sending food.
They sent chickens and so on.
It was a 10-day feast.
Anti-British sentiments in Malaya were strong.
Not just among the labourers.
Among farmers and intellectuals too.
Those in school.
That is why when the 10th Regiment was set up…
In less than 2 years…
We had?…how many?…five platoons.

INTERVIEWER:
Which weapon did you most like using?

PAK HATTA:
The AK.
The strongest weapon, the AK

INTERVIEWER:
How is it the strongest?

PAK HATTA:
It can be said to be the strongest weapon.
It can shoot planes.

INTERVIEWER:
Have you ever shot a plane?

PAK HATTA:
Personally, no. But other comrades in our troop have done it.

RADIO PLAY
(IN THAI):

KING TONG IS TALKING TO HIS TRUSTED LORD, URUPHONG

TONG
SO YOU NOTICED? SO WHY DID HE STAY?

URUPHONG
TO SATISFY THE GOOD QUEEN’S REQUEST.

TONG
HAH! SATISFY! I THINK THAT SAYS IT ALL! I HAVE BEEN DECEIVED!

URUPHONG
BUT YOUR MAJESTY! THE QUEEN IS WITHOUT SIN! BE CURED OF THIS DISEASED OPINION!

TONG
SHE IS THE DISEASED ONE!

URUPHONG
THEN WHO DOES INFECT HER?

TONG
PANU. I WANT YOU TO BE HIS CUPBEARER TONIGHT! GIVE HIM A DRINK THAT WILL PUT HIM TO SLEEP FOREVER!

INTERVIEWER:
In the period after the Japanese ran away and before the British took over…
many people blamed the Communist Party for the killings that went on.
What about that?

PAK KASSIM:
The truth is, although I may be wrong…
That wasn’t the Party but the Anti-Japanese Army.
This I know.
The Party tried to make peace.
Of course the propaganda said the Communists did the killings.
We did kill people but not in that way.
Sometimes we couldn’t operate because we were blocked by traitors.
We called them ‘ghosts.’
We couldn’t operate.
We had to eliminate them.
This we admit.
Because they were dogs of the British imperialists.
Then the Party made the decision…
To set up base in South Thailand.
It took a year and 6 months.
The Long March from Malaya to Thailand.
The journey was difficult.
Especially to do with supplies.
When we set out from Malaya we could only carry so much rice.
We’d often run out.
Sometimes we’d approach villages to get supplies.
There was once in Perak…was it Chemor?…
I came out for supplies…
But ended up in a skirmish with the British.

PAK BUDIN:
As the camp’s medicine man I would prepare the medicine myself.
Most of the time.
I would heal myself.
Once my legs were useless, paralysed.
I dug them myself.
I dug, followed the books…
We had books. I dug and dug and dug.
I would keep on digging.
I couldn’t walk at first.
If the enemy came, I would just die fighting them.
Where could I go with my useless legs?
Fight to the death.
So I would dig, not caring about pain.
Dig and dig and dig.
Dig for over a month …
Burn and dig. Hot damn!

INTERVIEWER:
What did you dig with?

PAK BUDIN:
I would dig with needles.
Wanna see?
Dig with needles. Burn with herbal leaves.
Burn, burn and dig. Dig.
After a month, hot damn!
I could walk like nothing happened. I could climb mountains.
If someone broke a leg, we would join it back.
No need to cut it off.
We used natural ingredients.
Leaves, sticks and root pounded with chicks.
To wrap and clamp and join together.

INTERVIEWER:
Pounded with chicks?

PAK BUDIN:
Chicks.

PAK KASSIM:
In the jungle we needed nutritious food.
Food with vitamins.
But in the jungle it was sometimes difficult to get proper food.
Like getting various types of meat.
We were at war, so we needed to be strong.
We had to eat what was in the jungle.
That’s the gist.
Do you know what I mean by jungle meat?
The propaganda outside was that communists ate pork,
ate elephant, ate tigers,
ate snake, ate frogs.
The enemy spread the propaganda so that the public would hate and oppose us.
Especially Malay Muslims...
On hearing we ate un-Islamic food,…
they would get angry.
How is it that Muslims can eat pork?
But if we forced to, we would eat.
It’s no big deal.
Even during the Prophet’s time…
In times of war, certain religious rules don’t apply.
When we are at peace, we obey.

RADIO PLAY:
(IN THAI)

URUPHONG CANNOT CONTAIN HIS WORRY AND SO CONFESSES TO KING PANU

URUPHONG
SIR, I WILL TELL YOU. I AM APPOINTED HIM TO MURDER YOU.

PANU
WHAT?? BY WHOM?

URUPHONG
BY KING TONG.

PANU
FOR WHAT?

URUPHONG
HE THINKS THAT YOU HAVE TOUCHED HIS QUEEN FORBIDDENLY.

PANU
HE HAS GONE MAD! WHAT SHOULD I DO?

URUPHONG
IT IS SAFER TO AVOID WHAT’S GROWN THAN TO QUESTION HOW IT WAS BORN. I WILL HELP YOU ESCAPE TONIGHT!

PANU
I NOTICED SOMETHING ODD ABOUT HIM. WE WILL ESCAPE. GIVE ME YOUR HAND. YOU SHALL NOW WORK WITH ME IN MY KINGDOM. FEAR OVERSHADOWS ME. COME!

PAK MALIK:
Thai people are cooperative. They help us.
They bought rice for us and so on.

INTERVIEWER:
Did any Thai people disapprove?

PAK MALIK:
Some didn’t, true.

INTERVIEWER:
Why didn’t they approve?

PAK MALIK:
Most Thais supported the comm…supported the Party.
They were good. Much better than Malays.

INTERVIEWER:
Why?

PAK MALIK:
They know how to keep secrets.
Even their wives didn’t know they did Party work.

INTERVIEWER:
So Malays aren’t good at keeping secrets?

PAK MALIK:
Not good.
Malays suck at keeping secrets.

INTERVIEWER:
Why?

PAK MALIK:
They’re fond of going to people’s houses and spreading stories…
And then going to other houses…
So much for secrets.

PAK KASSIM:
Then … in 1955 was it?
Tunku Abdul Rahman went to London to negotiate and came back to be Chief Minister.
We were not war-thirsty. We just wanted the British out.
If Malaya became independent we wanted to come out.
We wanted to be part of a self-governed nation.
We wanted a dialogue with Tunku Abdul Rahman.
Since we’re going to be independent we wanted to stop fighting.
But we had one condition. Legalise our Party.
We wanted to take part in elections.
A few Party leaders like Chin Pen and Rashid Maidin went to the talks.  Tunku Abdul Rahman gave an ultimatum: Surrender or perish.
Our Party said: “How can we agree?”
We wanted a peaceful solution to the war.
If it’s ‘surrender or perish’ what did we fight for?
We helped to free the country from the British.
We’re not saying we did it alone.
All patriotic citizens who were anti-British…
We know they did their part.
And we conducted armed warfare for 10 years…
We spilled blood and gave our lives.
We endured hardship and lacked food.
So many died. Villagers who supported us got arrested…
Were kept in holding camps…
Were hanged by the British.
In the talks, we were asked to surrender. Is this reasonable?
It should have been that all people, such as the nationalist party UMNO…
And we who took up arms against the British…
And all patriotic and democratic people played a role together.
So why reject us?
The British ruled our land for over 100 years.
There were anti-British warriors such as Bahaman in Pahang…
To’ Sago in Perak, To’ Gajah in Kelantan…
Haji Abdul Rahman in Terengganu and many more,,,
But they all failed.
Just failed.
Furthermore our sultans then were…Hmmf!
If they heard me they’d be angry with me.
The sultans then were subservient to the British.
Isn’t it risky for me to say this?
If I get arrested I will blame you.
Only after the Japanese could the descendents of those warriors rise again.
We all played a part.
Give our democratic rights.
Legalise the Party. We want to stand for elections.
What was Tunku Abdul Rahman afraid of? Competing against us in the polls?
But he’d called us terrorists and thieves.
Scared of competing against thieves?
Against terrorists?
No.
The British advisors behind him had told him…
Not to allow the communists. So he agreed.
But if he heard me, he’d be angry with me.
The talks failed.
We were still fine as had strength.
We had tens of thousands of supporters.
And weapons. We could go on.
We actively fought the British for 10 years.
From 1948 to 1957.
I took part in various skirmishes 121 times.

INTERVIEWER:
Were you ever injured?

PAK KASSIM:
No.
A bullet flew here. An inch lower and I would be a goner.
It went through my cap.
Some of the clashes went on for 4 hours.

LUDIN:
Then the police came and surrounded the whole hill.
He had been fighting there.
He remembered a new recruit.
He had already retreated but thought of the new recruit.
He went back to get him.
The soldiers were still lying in wait.
He tried to get the new recruit but the soldiers shot him.
He couldn’t move. His leg was broken.
He sacrificed himself.
The Thai soldiers came in close to get him.
He had a hand grenade which he used on himself.

INTERVIEWER:
Your father?

LUDIN:
My father.

PAK KASSIM:
Malaya became independent on 31 August 1957.
At that time, support for the Communist Party dropped.
Malayan people supported us less than before.
That’s why we didn’t want to actively fight the Malayan government.
But sometimes we would send troops to create disturbances in the country.
Our aim was to end the war peacefully.

INTERVIEWER:
Could you tell us a bit about daily life in the 10th Regiment…

PAK KASSIM:
Sure. We would normally sleep at 10pm.
We would get up at 5:30 or 6. And have a roll-call.
We would have military training or exercises until 9.
At 9 we would have rice for breakfast.

BULAT:
We once did a cultural show to celebrate the return of our 14th attack troop which operated across the border.
It was led by Abu Samah.
What they came back, that’s when it happened.
We had a stage-show, pretending to drive a car and so on.
The comrade who was acting shat in his pants right there.
Right in his pants. He had been poisoned.
He vomited and shat, vomited and shat.
The OK thing is that when many of us got poisoned together, the individual portion won’t be so dangerous.

PAK KASSIM:
After breakfast for half an hour, sometimes we’d have courses on learning Malay, Thai, Chinese, learn about world affairs and Party policy, learn the teachings of Marx and Chairman Mao.

PAK RAHIM:
We would make our own ink.
Not the ink that you get from containers nowadays.
We would use smoke.

INTERVIEWER:
Smoke?

PAK RAHIM:
To get soot. You know soot.
We would get gasoline into a bottle.
And twist in an old cloth to make a wick.
A wick as thick as my big toe.
Then we would light the fire and cover it with a tin.
We would poke a hole in the tin to let in air to feed the fire.
A whole bottle can produce this much soot.


PAK KASSIM:
In our team we had matrimonial procedures.
Because people need soul-mates.
But our procedures were…
I wouldn’t exactly call them modern…
But dictated by necessity.
We were in the jungle.
We didn’t have Islamic clergy to do the marriage rites.
Our weddings were done socially and based on consent, which we made official.
We figured this was not against Islam because we were at war.
It’s not considered unIslamic.
At least, that’s what I think. I don’t know what the Islamic scholars think.
But we had rules and codes of conduct.
There could not be any hanky-panky between men and women.
Those who were caught faced disciplinary action.
The punishment would not be the death penalty or anything like that.
Light punishments, like getting suspended or being made to study and memorise books on theory and so on.


BULAT:
’80? No, we came here in ’81.

SEMANGAT:
Yeah, that’s right.

BULAT:
Our team of over 200 people could fit here.

SEMANGAT:
Almost 300.

PINK SHIRT:
This tunnel is for air-strikes.
When we heard the whistle, that was our signal to go inside.
During the attack of ’82 there was a joint Thai-Malaysia offensive.
The invading troops were Thai but Malaysia paid.
They shot from their planes.
When we heard the whistle we all went inside.
But the bullets didn’t hit us.
They didn’t know we were here.
We’d never camp for long in one place.
If we felt exposed or we feared planes had spotted us we would leave.

SEMANGAT:
The rules when standing guard were like…You couldn’t smoke.
You had to be alert always.
With your weapon. You couldn’t sleep.
And you couldn’t chat with other comrades who walked by.
That was a strict no.
But sometimes things happened.
Some of our comrades would get a little tired…
And they would sleep while standing.
The monitoring officer would tap their shoulders.
“Sorry, I was asleep!” They’d be shocked awake.

BULAT:
We’re in the kitchen but we can’t offer food.
Our old brush is here.

PAK KASSIM:
Faith in God is up to the individual.
As Muslims, how can we not have faith?
Without faith, what would happen to us in the Afterlife?
I know my religious obligations.
Although we are communists, we still need religion.
Then one day I was summoned by Abdullah CD to represent the 10th Regiment…
to represent the Party leadership…
to begin early negotiations to end the war.
Times had changed.
Conditions within the Party had changed.
The country had changed.
The international situation had changed too.
Our economic situation had changed.
Previously we would depend economically on China.
Then when China started diplomatic ties with Malaysia…
Malaysia gave a condition: Stop supporting our Party.
It made life difficult for us.
But we’d been around so long.
The Malaysian government couldn’t destroy us.
They tried for decades to no avail.
But we couldn’t exactly take over the country either.
It was a no-win situation. We needed to find peace but in a fair and reasonable way.
I spent about 15 days in Hatyai.
For discussions with Thai government representatives.
There were probably some secret service types too.
I figured so.


RADIO PLAY
(IN THAI) :

WHEN KING TONG FINDS OUT THAT KING PANU HAD ESCAPED, THIS MAKES HIM EVEN ANGRIER.

TONG
IT IS PANU WHO HAS MADE YOUR BELLY SWELL LIKE THIS!

CHALIDA
BUT I'LL SWEAR HE HAD NOT!

TONG
YOU, MY LORDS, BEHOLD! SHE'S AN ADULTERESS!
AWAY WITH HER! TO PRISON!
.
IN PRISON, QUEEN CHALIDA GIVES BIRTH TO A BABY GIRL. A COURT LADY NAMED PIMPAKA COMES TO SEE THEM.

PIMPAKA
LET ME HAVE THE BABY. I WILL SHOW IT TO THE KING. SHE WILL SOFTEN HIS HEART.


PAK KASSIM:
There was an agreement…
To have talks in Lee Garden.
To sign the peace treaty.
The agreement marked the end of the war.
But we had conditions.
We needed economic help.
We had been in the jungle and didn’t have money.
We asked the Malaysian government how they would help the comrades who returned to Malaysia.
And what about the comrades who wanted to stay here?
Thailand was willing to provide land, houses, electricity and water.
Schools. Hospitals. An allowance.
Malaysia was not willing to give houses or land.
They just gave an allowance for 3 years.
They initially wanted our weapons.
We refused. Giving our weapons meant a surrender.
The talks almost failed due to weapons.
This is how we want Malaysia to be.
Not like the colonial days.
What’s lacking? The country’s rich.
But there are some aspects not compatible with our ideology.
Like casinos. I don’t like casinos.
But I kept my thoughts to myself. I’m only telling you now.
What are casinos like Genting Highlands for?
It’s OK if it’s just for golf. 
Ours is a Malay-Muslim country but many things don’t go with Islam.

RADIO PLAY
(IN THAI):

THE BRAVE PIMPAKA MARCHES TO SEE THE KING.

PIMPAKA
I COME FROM YOUR GOOD QUEEN.

TONG
GOOD QUEEN! HAH! GUARDS! FORCE HER HENCE!

PIMPAKA
THE GOOD QUEEN, FOR SHE IS GOOD, HAS BROUGHT YOU FORTH A DAUGHTER. HERE IT IS.

TONG
OUT! TAKE UP THE BASTARD! COMMIT IT TO THE FIRE!

PIMPAKA
IT IS YOURS. SHE LOOKS EXACTLY LIKE YOU. LOOK!

TONG
I'LL HAVE YOU BURNT!

PIMPAKA
I PRAY YOU, DO NOT PUSH ME; I'LL BE GONE. BUT I LEAVE THE BABY HERE.

TONG
SHALL I LIVE ON TO SEE THIS BASTARD KNEEL AND CALL ME FATHER? BETTER BURN IT NOW. ARGH! VIRANGOON!

VIRANGOON
YES YOUR MAJESTY?

TONG
CARRY THIS FEMALE BASTARD AND TAKE IT TO SOME REMOTE PLACE, AND LEAVE IT THERE WITHOUT MERCY.


PAK KASSIM:
Those who were born in Malaysia had a choice:
Remain in Thailand or go back to Malaysia.
I registered to return to Malaysia.
Even though I had a wife, child and grandchildren in Thailand.
Back in Malaysia the government there didn’t give me an identity card. Or rather they’re late.
I gave my photo and fingerprints and everything.
It’s been 5 years and still no card.
Back home, some people did try to insult me.
 “Why did you join the communists?”
“If you hadn’t joined you’d have a nice timber contract by now.”
I said, “You don’t understand politics at all!”
Getting rich in that way would be selfish.
But our country was a colony.
We wanted to be free.
That’s why we took up arms.
If I were selfish I would not have gone into the jungle.
I said: “Look at you! You weren’t in the jungle.
“That’s why you now have a big house and car and pension.
“But I didn’t want any of that. I wanted Malaya to be free.”
He thought I was stupid or something.
He tried to insult me.
I wouldn’t stand for it.
Without an identity card life became more difficult.
I was old, poor and didn’t have a household there.
I had relatives who wanted me to stay with them.
I refused. I’m no freeloader.
They wanted to take care of me until death. No thanks.
I wanted to come back and join my family here.
I returned to Thailand.

INTERVIEWER:
Did you ever miss home?

PAK SUKOR:
That’s to be expected, yes.
But because we were entrusted with such a big task…
We had to take all our sad thoughts and cast them aside.
We had our priorities.
What were they?
In the jungle, we had a saying:
“Our bodies in the wilderness…
our eyes gazing overseas…outside…
our hands embrace the motherland.”
“Our bodies in the wilderness…
Our hands embrace the motherland…
And our eyes see the whole world.”
These 3 phrases.
Therefore we were confident our crusade will end in victory.

PAK KASSIM:
Now I no longer do any Party work.
I just work for a living.
I  plant some rubber, duku and durian, petai and so on.
Thank God, although I’m unwell, I can survive on my rubber earnings.
Not much. I just get 10 kilos.
But the rubber price is good now.
I also get money from duku and durian.
I have a son.
When we had children in the jungle we couldn’t afford to raise them.
I wasn’t the only one.
Whoever had children in there had to give them away.
My son was born in 1964.
At the age of 7 days we sent him out to a village.
For someone to nurse and raise him.
When he was 19 I brought him into the jungle with me.
I settled it with his foster family. Paid them a bit.
Then he lived in the jungle.
The peace talks were just 4 or 5 years away.
Once outside, he didn’t want to stay with us.
He didn’t trust his parents.
We found him a wife but they divorced.
We take care of his son.
The boy on the motorcycle.
He’s been here since the age of 2 months.
My son’s in Yala.
He visits sometimes.
If I call and say I’m sick he will come.
Not that he ever helps.
He refuses to touch a hoe or machete.
He’d rather earn a regular salary…
Drive a car and sell merchandise. That’s what he likes.
He remarried and has a child.
One child.

INTERVIEWER:
When he grew up with his foster family, did he know he was adopted?

PAK KASSIM:
At first he said he didn’t know.
He thought his foster father was his real father.
Only recently did he believe his real father is here.
It’s me.
After this year is over I will be 87.
I’m not in the pink of health.
My knees hurt.
I have trouble sleeping. My eyes are weak.
I sometimes find it difficult to breathe.
But all that is fated.
Just thank God.
But I have not been to the mosque in 2 months.
I’m too sick to pray there. 
I used to pray and read the Quran with the others.
I know how to read the Quran. But it’s been 2 months…

RADIO PLAY
(IN THAI):

LORD VIRANGOON HAS SAILED TO A DESERT COUNTRY NEAR THE SEA. HE BRINGS THE BABY WITH HIM.

VIRANGOON
YOU ARE FATED TO BE RAISED BY BIRDS.
I HAVE HEARD THAT TIGERS CAN BE GENTLE.
COME, POOR BABY.
I HAVE HEARD, BUT NOT BELIEVED, THE SPIRITS OF THE DEAD MAY WALK AGAIN.
IF SUCH THING BE POSSIBLE, YOUR MOTHER APPEARED TO ME LAST NIGHT.
TO ME COMES A CREATURE, SOMETIMES HER HEAD ON ONE SIDE, SOME ANOTHER.
SHE WAS IN PURE WHITE ROBES.
WITH SHRIEKS SHE MELTED INTO AIR. 
I DO BELIEVE QUEEN CHALIDA IS DEAD.

PAK KASSIM:
Even if I return to Malaysia…
I won’t get arrested.
Most likely.
I’ll just be taken to the station to answer questions.
But then again…The village chief and others say:
“Just stay put. You’re old.”
“Don’t cause trouble.”
What kind of trouble? I’m too old.
I’ll just sit and eat and wait to die.
Waiting to die.

IN MEMORIAM PAK KASSIM (1920-2006)


RADIO PLAY
(IN THAI):

VIRANDOON
I CANNOT WEEP, BUT MY HEART BLEEDS. I AM CURSED TO CARRY OUT THIS OATH.  FAREWELL!

VIRANGOON
THE DAY GROWS ANGRIER.
A SAVAGE ROAR!
WHAT IS THIS, A BEAR?
IT IS CHASING ME: I AM GONE FOREVER!


CLOSING CREDITS, ONCE AGAIN OVER THE SONG “APA KHABAR ORANG KAMPUNG” BY SUDIRMAN.

THE END