Our Name - Mars Hill

Where does the name Mars Hill come from?

     The reference to Mars Hill is straight from the Bible! In Acts Chapter 17, one can read the account of the Apostle Paul in Athens, Greece. Paul was taken by the Epicurean and Stoic philosopher council to a meeting at the Areopagus. Areopagustranslates “hill of Ares.” In the Greek culture, Ares was the god of war and thunder. The Romans borrowed this god from the Greek culture and renamed the god Ares to “Mars.” Under Roman subjugation, the hill was known as “Mars Hill.”

     The Areopagus or rocky hill in Athens, north-west of the “Acropolis, where the Athenian supreme tribunal and court of” morals was held. From some part of this hill Paul delivered the address recorded in Acts 17:22-31. Paul proceeded to share God’s message of salvation to the Stoics and Epicureans at the Greek Mars Hill. The account of the Apostle Paul at Mars Hill conveys a similar mission of Mars Hill Speech and Debate to this day – Proclaim the existence of God to those who do not know Him.

     Mars’ Hill was the place where Paul spoke to the citizens of Athens, Greece as recorded in Acts 17. The original name is Areopagus, or Areios Pagos, meaning “Hill of Ares”. Ares was the Greek god of war. This is where, in Greek mythology, Ares was tried for the murder of Poseidon’s son, Alirrothios. During Roman occupation, they changed it’s name to accommodate their own god of war, Mars. Paul used this place as a point of emphasis to their “unknown god” belief. The Greeks, as the Romans, were polytheistic – many gods. Paul spoke to them of the One true God, the Creator of the universe, and finished his speech with that One true God’s love for them by giving His Son, Jesus the Christ, the Messiah.

     Mars Hill is the Roman name for a hill in Athens, Greece, called the Hill of Ares or the Areopagus (Acts 17:1922). Ares was the Greek god of war and according to Greek mythology this hill was the place where Ares stood trial before the other gods for the murder Poseidon’s son Alirrothios. Rising some 377 feet above the land below and not far from the Acropolis and Agora (marketplace), Mars Hill served as the meeting place for the Areopagus Court, the highest court in Greece for civil, criminal and religious matters. Even under Roman rule in the time of the New Testament, Mars Hill remained an important meeting place where philosophy, religion, and law were discussed.

     The biblical significance of Mars Hill is that it is the location of one of Paul’s most important gospel presentations at the time of his visit to Athens during his second missionary journey (Acts 17:16-34). It was where he addressed the religious idolatry of the Greeks who even had an altar to the “Unknown God.” It was this altar and their religious idolatry that Paul used as a starting point in proclaiming to them the one true God and how they could be reconciled to Him. Paul’s sermon is a classic example of a gospel presentation that begins where the listeners are and then presents the gospel message in a logical and biblical fashion. In many ways it is a classic example of apologetics in action. Paul started his message by addressing the false beliefs of those gathered there that day and then used those beliefs as a way of presenting the gospel message to them.

Paul used apologetics constantly to demonstrate the truth of Christ; the most famous episode occurs in Acts 17 on Mars Hill

 
     The reference to Mars Hill is straight from the Bible! In Acts Chapter 17, one can read the account of the Apostle Paul in Athens, Greece. Paul was taken by the Epicurean and Stoic philosopher council to a meeting at the Areopagus. Areopagustranslates “hill of Ares.” In the Greek culture, Ares was the god of war and thunder. The Romans borrowed this god from the Greek culture and renamed the god Ares to “Mars.” Under Roman subjugation, the hill was known as “Mars Hill.”

     The Areopagus or rocky hill in Athens, north-west of the “Acropolis, where the Athenian supreme tribunal and court of” morals was held. From some part of this hill Paul delivered the address recorded in Acts 17:22-31. Paul proceeded to share God’s message of salvation to the Stoics and Epicureans at the Greek Mars Hill. The account of the Apostle Paul at Mars Hill conveys a similar mission of Mars Hill Speech and Debate to this day – Proclaim the existence of God to those who do not know Him.

https://sites.google.com/site/marshillspeechanddebatearizona/our-pastors/a%20paul-at-aeropagus2.jpg

     Mars’ Hill was the place where Paul spoke to the citizens of Athens, Greece as recorded in Acts 17. The original name is Areopagus, or Areios Pagos, meaning “Hill of Ares”. Ares was the Greek god of war. This is where, in Greek mythology, Ares was tried for the murder of Poseidon’s son, Alirrothios. During Roman

occupation, they changed it’s name to accommodate their own god of war, Mars. Paul used this place as a point of emphasis to their “unknown god” belief. The Greeks, as the Romans, were polytheistic – many gods. Paul spoke to them of the One true God, the Creator of the universe, and finished his speech with that One true God’s love for them by giving His Son, Jesus the Christ, the Messiah.

     Mars Hill is the Roman name for a hill in Athens, Greece, called the Hill of Ares or the Areopagus (Acts 17:1922). Ares was the Greek god of war and according to Greek mythology this hill was the place where Ares stood trial before the other gods for the murder Poseidon’s son Alirrothios. Rising some 377 feet above the land below and not far from the Acropolis and Agora (marketplace), Mars Hill served as the meeting place for the Areopagus Court, the highest court in Greece for civil, criminal and religious matters. Even under Roman rule in the time of the New Testament, Mars Hill remained an important meeting place where philosophy, religion, and law were discussed.

     The biblical significance of Mars Hill is that it is the location of one of Paul’s most important gospel presentations at the time of his visit to Athens during his second missionary journey (Acts 17:16-34). It was where he addressed the religious idolatry of the Greeks who even had an altar to the “Unknown God.” It was this altar and their religious idolatry that Paul used as a starting point in proclaiming to them the one true God and how they could be reconciled to Him. Paul’s sermon is a classic example of a gospel presentation that begins where the listeners are and then presents the gospel message in a logical and biblical fashion. In many ways it is a classic example of apologetics in action. Paul started his message by addressing the false beliefs of those gathered there that day and then used those beliefs as a way of presenting the gospel message to them.  Paul used apologetics constantly to demonstrate the truth of Christ; the most famous episode occurs in Acts 17 on Mars Hill.

Where does the name Mars Hill come from?

     The reference to Mars Hill is straight from the Bible! In Acts Chapter 17, one can read the account of the Apostle Paul in Athens, Greece. Paul was taken by the Epicurean and Stoic philosopher council to a meeting at the Areopagus. Areopagustranslates “hill of Ares.” In the Greek culture, Ares was the god of war and thunder. The Romans borrowed this god from the Greek culture and renamed the god Ares to “Mars.” Under Roman subjugation, the hill was known as “Mars Hill.”

     The Areopagus or rocky hill in Athens, north-west of the “Acropolis, where the Athenian supreme tribunal and court of” morals was held. From some part of this hill Paul delivered the address recorded in Acts 17:22-31. Paul proceeded to share God’s message of salvation to the Stoics and Epicureans at the Greek Mars Hill. The account of the Apostle Paul at Mars Hill conveys a similar mission of Mars Hill Speech and Debate to this day – Proclaim the existence of God to those who do not know Him.

     Mars’ Hill was the place where Paul spoke to the citizens of Athens, Greece as recorded in Acts 17. The original name is Areopagus, or Areios Pagos, meaning “Hill of Ares”. Ares was the Greek god of war. This is where, in Greek mythology, Ares was tried for the murder of Poseidon’s son, Alirrothios. During Roman occupation, they changed it’s name to accommodate their own god of war, Mars. Paul used this place as a point of emphasis to their “unknown god” belief. The Greeks, as the Romans, were polytheistic – many gods. Paul spoke to them of the One true God, the Creator of the universe, and finished his speech with that One true God’s love for them by giving His Son, Jesus the Christ, the Messiah.

     Mars Hill is the Roman name for a hill in Athens, Greece, called the Hill of Ares or the Areopagus (Acts 17:1922). Ares was the Greek god of war and according to Greek mythology this hill was the place where Ares stood trial before the other gods for the murder Poseidon’s son Alirrothios. Rising some 377 feet above the land below and not far from the Acropolis and Agora (marketplace), Mars Hill served as the meeting place for the Areopagus Court, the highest court in Greece for civil, criminal and religious matters. Even under Roman rule in the time of the New Testament, Mars Hill remained an important meeting place where philosophy, religion, and law were discussed.

     The biblical significance of Mars Hill is that it is the location of one of Paul’s most important gospel presentations at the time of his visit to Athens during his second missionary journey (Acts 17:16-34). It was where he addressed the religious idolatry of the Greeks who even had an altar to the “Unknown God.” It was this altar and their religious idolatry that Paul used as a starting point in proclaiming to them the one true God and how they could be reconciled to Him. Paul’s sermon is a classic example of a gospel presentation that begins where the listeners are and then presents the gospel message in a logical and biblical fashion. In many ways it is a classic example of apologetics in action. Paul started his message by addressing the false beliefs of those gathered there that day and then used those beliefs as a way of presenting the gospel message to them.

Paul used apologetics constantly to demonstrate the truth of Christ; the most famous episode occurs in Acts 17 on Mars Hill