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Washington Township

CHAPTER XXVII. 
WASHINGTON TOWNSHIP.i 
 
The township of Washington is the central one in the northern tier of townships of Marion County, being bounded on 
the west by Pike, on the south by Centre, on the east by Lawrence townships, and on the north by Hamilton County.
The principal
streams (and the only ones of any importance) are White River and Fall Creek. The former enters the
township near its northeast corner, and flows thence diagonally across the township in a very meandering, but generally
southwest, course to a point a little east of the southwestern corner, where it passes into Centre township. Fall Creek,
coming in from Lawrence, flows southwestwardly across the southeast part of Washington township into Centre.
Several inconsiderable streams, tributaries of White River, enter it within the territory of Washington, chiefly from the
west. The surface of this township is much like that of the others of the county, ranging from flat bottom-lands to
undulating uplands, which, in some parts, may be termed hilly. The soil is, in general, good, and in some parts
exceedingly fertile, yielding abundant returns to the farmer for the labor expended on it. The population of the
township in 1880 was two thousand three hundred and ninety-nine, as shown by the returns of the United States
census of that year.
Washington township was laid off' and erected by order of the county commissioners, April 16, 1822, with boundaries 
as described in the general history of the county. In November, 1826, the western boundary was changed by order
of the county board, by including in Washington three sections of land taken from Pike, in survey township 16 north,
of range 3 east, leaving that boundary line as it is at the present time.
When Washington township was erected, in April, 1822, the commissioners ordered that it be joined with Lawrence 
as one township, neither being then sufficiently populous for separate organization. This union continued until Sept.
4, 1826, when the county board of justices ordered Lawrence to be taken from Washington, leaving the latter as a
separate and independent township. Following is a list of officers of Washington township during the sixty-two years
of its existence, viz.:  
JUSTICES OF THE PEACE.
Joel Wright, June 15, 1822, to Sept. 5, 1825; resigned. 
William D. Roolser, June 22, 1822, to June 6, 1827.
Hiram Bacon, Oct. 15, 1825, to Jan. 4, 1830; resigned.
        (The three above named served as justices for Washington and Lawrence while they were united as one township.)
Joel Wright, July 22, 1827, to April, 1828; died.
Edward Roberts, June 28, 1828, to June 20, 1833.
Abraham Bowen, Feb. 20, 1830, to Feb. 12, 1835.
Daniel R. Smith, Oct. 30, 1833, to Oct. 23, 1838.
Abraham Bowen, April 18, 1835, to April 6, 1840.
John R. Anderson, Nov. 30, 1836, to Sept. 23, 1837; resigned.
William R. Deford, Oct. 17, 1837, to March 1, 1841; resigned.
Lorenzo Vanscyoc, June 20, 1838, to June 2, 1843.
Daniel R. Smith, Dec. 3, 1838, to July 25, 1842; resigned.
Walter A. Bridgford, Dec. 12, 1839, to Dec. 7, 1844.
Charles Hallam, April 20, 1840, to April 15, 1845.
Henry B. Evans, April 6, 1841, to Oct. 2, 1841; resigned.
Daniel R. Brown, Nov. 24, 1841, to Jan. 13, 1846; resigned.
Anthony Williams, Sept. 20, 1842, to April 18, 1846; resigned.
Lorenzo Vanscyoc, July 22, 1843, to July 3, 1848.
Eli Heaton, April 29, 1845, to Aug. 29, 1853; resigned.
John Essary, Feb. 27, 1846, to Feb. 27, 1851.
Gary H. Boatright, June 9, 1846, to March 1, 1847; resigned.
James S. Hensley, April 22, 1847, to Feb. 28, 1851; resigned.
William B. Bridgford, July 6, 1848, to July 4, 1852.
David Huff, April 21, 1851, to April 21, 1856.
William Stipp, April 29, 1854, to April 29, 1858.
James G. Featherston, Nov. 1, 1855, to Nov. 1, 1859.
John Essary, April 19, 1858, to Dec. 1, 1864; resigned.
William Stipp, May 24, 1858, to April 19, 1862.
Emsley Right, Nov. 1, 1859, to April 9, 1863; resigned.
Benjamin Tyner, April 19, 1862, to April 19, 1866.
James W. Schooley, Nov. 4, 1863, to Dec. 10, 1864; resigned.
George W. Deford, April 21, 1865, to April 21, 1869.
Benjamin Tyner, April 21, 1866, to Jan. 2, 1869; resigned.
Calvin Fortner, April 25, 1866, to April 12, 1870.
George W. Deford, April 24, 1869, to April 24, 1873.
John W. Vanscyoc, May 1, 1869, to April 16, 1873.
James Logan Groves, Nov. 25, 1870, to Oct. 25, 1874
John W. Vanscyoc, April 24, 1873, to present time.
John P. Moore, Oct. 30, 1874, to Aug. 15, 1875; died.
John Stipp, Oct. 25, 1876, to May 15, 1880; died.
Alexander Culbertson, April 21, 1877, to April 21, 1881.
Gilbert Justice, May 15, 1880, to Oct. 25, 1880.
Henry C. Green, Dec. 16, 1881, to April 15, 1882.
Daniel W. Heaton, April 15, 1382, to Aug. U, 1883; resigned.
Alexander Culbertson, Sept. 4, 1883, to April 15, 1886.
David Huff, April 11, 1859, to April 19, 1860.
Jacob O. Coil, April 19, 1860, to April 13, 1861.
Lorenzo Vanscyoc, April 13, 1861, to April 22, 1862.
William Vance, April 22, 1862, to April 12, 1865.
Hiram A. Haverstick, April 12, 1865, to Oct. 19, 1872.
John H. Smith, Oct. 19, 1872, to Oct. 23, 1874.
William H. Sharpe, Oct. 23, 1874, to May 11, 1876.
Hiram A. Haverstick, May 11, 1876, to April 14, 1880.
James Mustard, April 14, 1880, to April 14, 1882.
George W. Lancaster, April 14, 1882, for two years.

ASSESSORS.
Joel Wright, Jan. 1, 1827, to Jan. 5, 1829. 
Daniel R. Smith, Jan. 5, 1829, to March 7, 1836.
David Bowen, March 7, 1836.
Young Em. R. Wilson, Jan. 2, 1837.
Carlton R. Smith, Jan. 2, 1837, to Jan. 7, 1839.
Daniel R. Brown, Jan. 7, 1839, to Jan. 6, 1840.
Jacob Roberts, Jan. 6, 1840, to Dec. 6, 1841.
Jacob Roberts, Dec. 6, 1852, to Nov. 18, 1854.
Ira Keeler, Nov. 18, 1854, to Jan. 6, 1857.
William Shartz, Jan. 6, 1857, to Dec. 13, 1858.
Jacob Roberts, Dec. 13, 1858, to Dec. 10, 1864.
John Essary, Dec. 10, 1866, to Aug. 1, 1873.
Benjamin Tyner, March 27, 1875, to Nov. 6, 1876.
Daniel W. Heaton, Nov. 6, 1876, to April 15, 1880.
Samuel Sheets, April 15, 1880, to April 14, 1882.
William H. Wheeler, April 14, 1882, to April 14, 1884.
One of the earliest, if not the very first, of the pioneer settlers who came to make their homes within the territory 
now embraced in the township of Washington was John Allison. He was born in Virginia about 1759, and went from
there to Lexington, Ky., at the age of fourteen years, with his parents. Subsequently he moved to Nicholas County,
Ky., and from there came to this township in October, 1819. He came through with his family, consisting of wife
(formerly Anna Gray) and eight children, via Brookville, Ind., in wagons, cutting his road for quite a distance
between here and Brookville. He left two married daughters in Kentucky, who subsequently came here. He
entered eighty acres near where Allisonville now stands (at present owned by the Widow Devanberger), upon
which he resided till his death, September, 1837. He was a hard-working, industrious citizen, and followed farming
all his life. He at one time owned two hundred and seventy acres in one body, two hundred acres of which he cleared.
His wife died Jan. 2, 1838. When Mr. Allison settled here in the woods, his nearest neighbors were William Coats and
Joseph Coats, who lived two miles distant in a northwest direction. He. lived there about nine years before his family
enjoyed the privileges of even a subscription school. The Indians were in the neighborhood for three years after he
settled. Mr. Allison laid out the town of Allisonville. He was a Freemason for years before he came to this State, and
was regarded as a moral, industrious, sociable citizen. He took a great interest in the schools, and everything tending
to the advancement of civilization. The following were the names of his children: Mary, Martha, Jane, Malinda, Julia Ann,
Nancy, John, David, Charles, and William. Only two, Nancy and William, are now living. The former is the widow of
William Orpurd. Both live in this county, and are the oldest residents now living in this part of the county. Few, if any,
persons now living in this county have resided here for so long a time as they.
Charles Allison was born in Kentucky, and came from that State to this township with his parents in October, 1819, 
and settled near where the town of Allisonville now is, and where he remained with his parents until thirty-five years
of age. He owned eighty acres east of Allisonville, now owned by the Widow Sterrett. He removed to Howard County,
Ind., and established a trading-post eight miles east of Kokomo, on Wild Cat, where he traded with the Indians for
some time. He followed farming and teaming while he lived here, and was a merchant while in Howard County. He
kept the first store ever kept in Kokomo. He died about 1864, and his widow and one child are now living in Kokomo.
David Allison was born in Kentucky, and came from that State to this township with his father, John Allison, in the 
year 1819. He resided with his parents until about 1840, when he married Matilda Ellery and went to West Liberty,
Hamilton Co., this State, where he continued to reside until his death, in 1878. He belonged to the Methodist Church
twenty years prior to his death. His widow and one child are now living near West Liberty.
Hiram Bacon, Sr., was born in Williamstown, Mass., on March 14, 1801. He was of English descent. He came to Indiana 
about 1819, and for about one year was a member of a government surveying party that surveyed land in this part
of the State. He then returned to his home and married Mary A. Blair, and on the day of his marriage emigrated to
Indiana with his wife, and settled in this township in 1821. He purchased two hundred and forty acres from William
Bacon, who had entered it from the government. A portion of Malott Park is upon the farm. Subsequently he bought
one hundred and forty-five acres from Arthur Williams. He built his first cabin in the dense woods, and made the sash
for its window with his pocket-knife. That was the first glass window in that part of the county. An Indian brush-fence
surrounded his cabin, and within the inclosure was an Indian well. He operated not only the first, but the most
extensive cheese dairy ever in Marion County. Beginning the business on his farm in 1830, he continued it for
twenty years. He was a member of the first Presbyterian Church ever built in Indianapolis, and he hauled with his
oxen the logs used in its construction. He joined the Presbyterian Church in early life, and was a consistent member
of that denomination until his death. He took great interest in all church matters, and held various oflicial positions in it.
His vocation was that of a farmer. He was justice of the peace in this township for a period of twelve years. In politics
he was a Whig, and then a Republican. He was one of the leading citizens of the township, and was noted for his strict
integrity. His first wife died in November, 1863; he remarried, and in August, 1882, he died. Seven children survive
him, viz.: Electa (widow of William P. Thornton), Helen (wife of Charles A. Howland), George, Hiram, Mary A.
(wife of B. F. Tuttle), William, and Caroline (wife of George W. Sloan).
William Bacon was born in Williamstown, Mass., about 1798. He came to Indiana a single man soon after his brother 
Hiram, and settled on land about one mile north of where Malott Park now is. There he lived till his death, in about
1863. He married Deborah, daughter of Hezekiah Smith, Sr., soon after his arrival here. He was a farmer, and a
member of the Masonic fraternity. In politics he was a Democrat. He lived a proper life for years, and left behind him
a large and valuable estate.
Hezekiah Smith, Sr., was born in Delaware, April 18, 1763. At the age of sixteen he entered the Revolutionary army, 
and was in nine battles. His eldest brother, Daniel, was killed in the Revolutionary war. His brother Simeon was also
in the same war, and also in the war of 1812, and lived to enjoy the blessings for which he fought. The subject of this
sketch married Mary Ann Rector, who was born in Virginia, Feb. 12, 1776. Her mother died when she was an infant,
and she was raised by her uncle, Presley Neville, in Pittsburgh, Pa. The Rector family was large, and many of them
emigrated to Ohio, where a number of their descendants now reside on Mad River, in Champaign and Clark Counties.
Hezekiah Smith was a local preacher of the Methodist Episcopal Church; by trade he was a wagon-maker, and worked
at that business in the Bluelicks, Nicholas County, Ky.; but subsequently he bought a farm on Indian Creek, and
partially quitting his trade, followed farming. The following are the names of his children, viz.: Betty, Susan, Deborah,
Daniel R., Peter, Hezekiah, Nancy, Simeon, Miles C , Carlton R., and Marcus L. The seven sons all reached manhood
and became sober, industrious, and useful citizens. But two of the children are living, viz., Susan Chinn, in Colorado,
and Marcus L. Smith, in Argos, Ind. In 1820, Mr. Smith sold his farm in Kentucky and moved his family to this
township, and settled in the woods Oct. 27, 1820, about one half-mile east of where Broad Ripple now is, and on the
west half of northeast quarter of section 6, township 16, range 4 east. At that time there were but two or three cabins
between where he settled and the donation, as Indianapolis was then called. Mr. Smith and his son Peter had came
out to where the family settled and made an improvement, and raised a crop of corn the spring before. The family
lived in camp for six weeks after arrival here, when a cabin was built, into which they moved before winter.
Mr. Smith was a man of extraordinary memory, of strong and vigorous mind, and a great reader. After an illness 
of four weeks he died, on the 26th day of August, 1824, in the sixty-second year of his age, and his remains were
buried in the burial-ground on the Hiram Bacon land. He was the first person buried in that graveyard. His widow
remained on the old homestead, and kept the family together until her death, Oct. 3, 1837.
Daniel R. Smith, son of Hezekiah Smith, Sr., and Mary Ann, his wife, was born in Mason County, Ky., near May's Lick,
in a log cabin, on the 4th of October, 1801. He emigrated to this township with his parents Oct. 27, 1820. He remained
with the family until shortly after his marriage to Margaret N., eldest daughter of John Nesbit, on Nov. 11, 1834.
He then began life for himself and wife, settling on the farm now owned by his son, John H. There he lived the
remainder of his life. When comparatively a young man he was elected justice of the peace, in which capacity
he served five years, and was re-elected to the same office, and commissioned for five years on the 3d day of
December, 1838.
He served a part of the term, but resigned to accept the office of associate judge of the Circuit Court, to which he 
was elected in August, 1842, and served for a period of seven years from the 8th of April, 1843. In 1849 he was
re-elected to the same office for seven years from April 8, 1850, and served in that capacity until the office was
abolished. On Sept. 20, 1851, he was admitted as an attorney and counselor-at-law, with authority to practice
in the circuit and inferior courts of Indiana, and he followed that profession the rest of his life. Soon after the
establishment of the new Constitution he was elected one of the township trustees, and served as such for three
years, during which time he assisted in the organization of the public-school system in the township. He was a
member of the Methodist Episcopal Church at the time of his death, and for ten years prior to that time. He
always took an active part in promoting the cause of religion. He was one of the leading citizens of the township;
of steady habits, moral, industrious, and sociable. He was a good and kind neighbor, and was a great encourager
of every laudable public enterprise. His wife died Aug. 11, 1854, and he died April 4, 1875. He left two children,
John H. and Mary Ann. The son is now living on the old homestead where he was born, near Malott Park, and is
by occupation a farmer. The daughter is the wife of Dr. Greenly B. Woollen, and resides in Indianapolis.
Peter Smith, the second son of Hezekiah Smith, Sr., was born in Kentucky, Sept. 27, 1803. He emigrated to this 
township with his father's family in 1820, and remained with his parents till after his father's death. He learned
the gunsmith trade, and afterwards became a physician and practiced medicine a few years in the neighborhood
of Millersville. He married in 1825, and a few years afterwards went to Nashville, Tenn., thence to New Orleans,
where he took the gold fever about 1849 and went to San Francisco, Cal., where he established a hospital. He was
in South America a while, but returned and went to Europe, settling in England, where he died Oct. 9, 1866. He was
a very successful practitioner of medicine, and for many years a consistent member of the Methodist Episcopal Church.
Hezekiah Smith, Jr., was born Nov. 29, 1805, in Kentucky, and in 1820 emigrated to this township with his parents, 
with whom he lived till after his father's death. He married in June, 1829, and lived for several years about half a mile
southeast of Millersville, on the east part of the farm now owned by William A. Schofield. He joined the Methodist
Church at an early date, and was ordained a minister of the gospel, and preached with good eflfect for many years.
He died in Indianapolis Dec. 4, 1879.  
James Ellis was born in Tennessee about 1798. He came to the township a single man in March, 1820, and settled one 
half-mile southwest of where Millersville now is. He lived for a while on the farm now owned by David Huff's heirs.
He was an industrious, moral citizen. He married Leah Cruise, who is now living on the old homestead. She has in her
possession a large dish which her husband bought of Mrs. Garner sixty-five years ago. Mr. Ellis died in 1845. Mr. and
Mrs. Ellis raised four children, three of whom are living. Alfred lives on the old homestead. Henry is in Colorado,
and Palina, the wife of William J. Millard, Jr., lives in Iowa. When Mr. Ellis came into this township there were no schools,
no preaching, nothing but woods, wild animals, and Indians. He assisted in the burial of the first white person that ever
died in Lawrence township, this county.
Martin McCoy, wife, and children came from Kentucky to this township with Henry Cruise in 1820. His wife died in 1821. 
He was a great hunter and trapper. He was with the Indians most of the time; was missing, and it was supposed that the
Indians killed him.
Henry Cruise was born in North Carolina in 1760. He came to Daviess County, Ind., from Ohio in October, 1816, and 
thence to this township in June, 1820. He came up White Eiver in a boat with his family, and Martin McCoy and family
to within eight miles of Indianapolis, and the rest of the way in wagons. His wife's maiden name was Susannah Cress.
He settled in the woods on Fall Creek, near where the Wabash Railroad crosses. In 1824 he went to Illinois, and died
there. He was a member of the Presbyterian Church, and by occupation a farmer. He was the father of ten children,
six of whom are now living.
William Hardin was born in Virginia in 1780. He came from Lawrenceburg to this township in 1820, and entered one 
hundred and sixty acres, now owned by Joseph Schofield. He lived there eighteen years, then went to Iowa, where he
died about 1858. He was of Baptist belief, but not a member of the church. He was a very industrious, moral citizen,
and by occupation a farmer.
Joel Wright, one of the first settlers of Washington township, was born in Stokes County, N. C, on the 5th of February, 
1793, and was married to Sarah Byerby on the 10th of September, 1812, in North Carolina. They moved from there
to Indiana in May 12, 1813, settling temporarily in what is now Wayne County, on the west fork of White Water. From
there they moved to Washington township, Marion Co., on the 22d day of December, 1821.
Joel Wright was appointed one of the first justices of the peace for Washington township. When his term expired he was 
run again, and received the largest vote, being elected over Hiram Bacon, Esq., in 1826. On the 1st of April, 1828, Mr.
Wright cut the artery in his left leg below the knee. On the 6th, Drs. Dunlap and Kitchen amputated the limb about four
inches above the knee, and three days afterwards Mr. Wright died, leaving Sarah Wright, his wife, with seven children,
— Alfred, Mary, Jincy, Emsley, Phebe, Elizabeth, and Lucinda. On the 25th of August, 1828, another child, Joel Wright,
was born. Mrs. Wright lived a widow all the rest of her life, and raised the eight children. She died at the age of seventy-
six years.
Conrad Colip was born in Pendleton County, Va., about 1795. In 1821 he came to this township with his family and 
settled on one hundred and sixty acres now owned by James Bridges. He followed farming all his life, and was a moral
man and a good citizen. He left the township about 1852 and went to St. Joseph County, Ind., where he died several years
ago.
Jacob Hushaw, who was of German descent, was born in Virginia. He came to this township from Ohio in 1821, and 
settled near where Broad Ripple now is. He was a carpenter by trade, and a good mechanic. He died on his old homestead
about 1843.
Zachariah Collins, with his wife and family, came from Mason County, Ky., to this township about 1821, and entered 
one hundred and sixty acres of land, now owned by David Allen. He was a farmer, industrious, and a good neighbor.
He lived there till about 1840, then sold to Mr. Allen, and went to near Bloomington, Iowa, where he bought a farm,
and joined the Methodist Episcopal Church. He was one of the first settlers in the township.
The earliest assessment-roll of Washington township that can now be found is that of the year 1829, which, being 
complete, shows, of course, very nearly who were the male adult inhabitants of the township at that time. The following
names, taken from it, are those of men then resident in the township who were assessed on no real estate, viz.:  

Alexander Ayers. Ellis Bunnell. 
Charles Allison. Robert Barnhill. 
Willis Atkins. Robert Brown. 
David Allison. Daniel Bowes. 
Jacob Applegate. James Cook. 
Thomas Blackerby. Daniel Clark. 
John Burrough. James Cochran. 
Robert Branson. George Clark. 
William Brunson. Richard Clark. 
Jonathan Brunson. Absalom Cruise. 
Thomas Brunson. William Deford. 
Evan Ballenger. Squire Dawson. 
John Burns. James Ellis. 
John Brady. Ephraim Elkins. 
John Brady, Jr. Charles Ecret. 
Ralph Fults. 
Jacob Hushaw. 
William Hart. 
Caleb Harrison. 
John Harrison. 
Benjamin Inman. 
Thomas Jackson. 
John Jackson. 
Noah Jackson. 
Nathan Johnson. 
Milton Johnson. 
James Kimberlain. 
Jacob L. Kimberlain. 
Jefferson Keeler. 
John Kimberlan. 
Samuel Leeper. 
Robert Leeper. 
Samuel Lakin. 
Andrew Leeper. 
John Mansfield. 
Zebedee Miller. 
John Miller. 
Michael Miller. 
Alexander Mills. 
John McCoy, Jr. 
William Mansfield. 
John Medsker. 
John G. Mcllvain. 
William Mcllvain. 
William McClung. 
Daniel Miller. 
Edmund Newby. 
William Orpurd. 
Barrett Parrish. 
Adam Pense. 
Nicholas Porter. 
James Porter. 
Jonathan Ray. 
John Ray. 
John Smith. 
Isaac Stephens. 
Isaac Simpkins. 
David Sharp. 
John Shields. 
Hezekiah Smith. 
Samuel P. Sellers. 
Harvey Steers. 
Thomas Todd. 
Jacob Triggs. 
Richard Vanlandingham. 
William Viney. 
Joseph Watts. 
Edward Watts. 
Richard Watts. 
Edward Wells. 
Robert Williamson. 
William McCoy, 
 
The same assessment-roll gives the following names of persons resident in Washington township in 1829, and who 
were owners or holders of the lands respectively described, viz.:
John Allison, the west half of the southwest quarter of section 21, township 17, range 4, and the east half of the northeast 
quarter of section 29 in the same township.
William Appleton, the north half of the northwest quarter of section 14, township 16, range 3. 
Abraham Bowen, the east half of the northeast quarter of section 24, township 17, range 3. Mr. Bowen lived in the north 
part of the township, and died only a very few years ago. Several of his family are now living in the township.
James Brown, the east half of the southwest quarter of section 30, township 17, range 4. Mr. Brown came to this 
township from Kentucky in 1824.
Hiram Bacon, Esq., the west half of the southwest quarter of section 5; the east half of the southeast quarter of section 
6, and the east half of the northeast quarter of section 7, all intownship 16, range 4.
William Bacon, the southwest quarter of section 31, and the southwest quarter of section 32, in township 17, range 4. 
James Bonnell, the east half of the northeast quarter of section 35; the southwest quarter of section 25; the east half 
of the southeast quarter of section 26, and the north half of the southwest quarter of section 35, all in township 17, range 3.
Jesse Ballinger, the east half of the northeast quarter of section 9, township 16, range 4. 
Zachariah Collins, the northwest quarter of section 18, township 16, range 4. 
Joseph Coats, the west half of the northwest quarter of section 21, township 17, range 4, and the north half of the 
northeast quarter of same section.
Conrad Colip, the north half of the northeast quarter of section 12, township 16, range 3; the south half of the 
southeast quarter of section 1, same township, and one hundred and forty acres in the northeast and southeast
quarters of section 19, township 17, range 4.
Jacob Coil, the south half of the southwest quarter of section 36, township 17, range 3; eighty-eight acres in the 
northwest quarter of same section; the south half of the northeast quarter of section 12, township 16, range 3; and
the north half of the northeast quarter of section 1, same township.
William Crist, the east half of the southwest quarter of section 5, township 16, range 4. 
Isaac Coppuck, fifty acres in the southeast quarter of section 17 and northeast quarter of section 20, township 17, range 4. 
William Coats, the east half of the northwest quarter of section 29, township 17, range 4. 
Solomon Cruise, the east half of the northeast quarter of section 31, township 17, range 4. 
Fielding Clark, the west half of the northwest quarter of section 32, township 71, range 4. 
Robert Dickerson's heirs, the west half of the southeast quarter of section 6, township 16, range 4. 
William Duffield, all the land east of the river in section 2, township 16, range 3, and the east half of the northeast 
quarter of section 11, township 16, range 3.
Elijah Dawson, the southwest quarter and the east half of the northeast quarter of section 6, and the west half of the 
northwest quarter of section 5, all in township 16, range 4; also the west half of the northeast quarter and the east half
of the same section, in township 17, range 4; forty acres in the southeast quarter of section 12, township 16, range 3;
and the north half of section 36, township 17, range 3.
John Fox, the east half of the southwest quarter of section 3, township 16, range 3, and the east half of the southeast 
quarter of section 9, same township.
Noah Flood, the east half of the northeast quarter of section 24, township 16, range 4. 
John Gwin, the north half of the northeast quarter of section 14, township 16, range 3. 
Garret Garrison, the south half of the southeast quarter of section 10, township 16, range 3. 
Jonas Hoover, the east half of the southeast quarter of section 14, township 16, range 3. 
William Hobson, the west half of the southeast quarter and the east half of the southwest quarter of section 24, 
township 17, range 3.  
Lewis Hoffman, the east half of the southwest quarter of section 18, township 17, range 4. 
Philip Hardin, forty acres in the east half of the northwest quarter of section 12, township 16, range 3. 
Jonas Hoffman, the northwest quarter of section 6, township 16, range 4, and the part east of the river (sixty acres) of 
the southeast quarter of section 36, township 17, range 3; five acres east of river in the southwest quarter of the same
section, and forty acres west of the river in the southwest and southeast sections, same township.
William Hardin, the northeast quarter of section 18, township 16, range 4, and forty acres in the east half of the 
northwest quarter of section 12, township 16, range 3.
Henry Hardin, Sr., the north half of the east half of the southeast quarter of section 7, township 16, range 4. 
John Johnson, the east half of the southwest quarter of section 18, township 16, range 4. 
Thomas Keeler, fifty acres in the south half of the southwest quarter of section 35, township 17, range 3. 
Elias Leming, ninety-eight acres in the southeast quarter of section 2, township 16, range 3. 
Noah Leverton, the south half of the northeast quarter of section 14, township 16, range 3. 
Thomas A. Long, the east half of the northeast quarter of section 5, township 16, range 4. 
Samuel McCormick, the east half of the northwest quarter of section 15, township 16, range 3. 
James McCoy, the east half of the northwest quarter and the west half of the northeast quarter of section 5, township 
16, range 4.
John McCoy, the south half of the southeast quarter and forty acres in the west half of the same quarter of section 12, 
township 16, range 3.
George Medsker, the southwest quarter of section 17, township 17, range 4; also the west half of northeast quarter, 
and the east half of the northwest quarter of the same section.
James Mcllvain, Sr., the east half of the southwest quarter of section 12, township 16, range 3. 
Nathan McMillen, the west half of the southwest quarter of section 12, township 16, range 3. 
Daniel McDonald, the northeast quarter of section 13, township 16, range 3. 
Lyle McClung, the southeast quarter of section 8, township 16, range 4. 
Peter Negley, the southeast quarter of section 4, township 16, range 4. 
Edward Roberts, Esq., forty acres in the west half of the northwest quarter of section 10, township 16, range 3, and 
the west half of the southwest quarter of the same section.
Jacob Roberts, the north half of the southeast quarter of section 34, township 17, range 3. 
Sargent Ransom, the east half of the southwest quarter of section 10, township 16, range 3. 
John Richardson, one hundred and three acres west of river iu the southeast quarter of section 17, and northeast 
quarter of section 20, township 17, range 4.
William Ramsey, the south half of the northeast quarter of section 21, township 17, range 4. 
David Ray, the northwest quarter of section 18, township 17, range 4. 
William D. Rooker, the west half of the southwest quarter of section 17, township 16, range 4. 
John Reagan, Jr., the whole of section 20, township 17, range 4. 
Samuel Ray, the south half of the northwest quarter of section 28, township 17, range 3. 
Isaac Stipp, the west half of the southwest quarter of section 13, township 16, range 3. 
Peter Smith, one hundred and fifteen acres in the northwest quarter of section 6, township 16, range 4. 
Mary Ann Smith, sixty-eight acres in the west half of the northeast quarter of section 6, township 16, range 4. 
John St. Clair, the north end (forty acres) of the east half of the southeast quarter of section 7, township 16, range 4, and 
the southwest quarter of section 8 in same township.
Daniel R. Smith, the east half of the southwest quarter of section 4, township 16, range 4. 
Cornelius Van Scyock, the south half of the southeast quarter of section 34, township 17, range 3. 
John Van Blaricum, the west half of the southwest quarter of section 15, township 16, range 3. 
William Vincent, the east half of the southeast quarter of section 13, township 17, range 3. 
Isaac Whitinger. twenty-seven acres in the northwest quarter of section 20, township 17, range 4, and one hundred 
and forty-seven acres in the northeast and southeast quarters of section 19, same township.
Henry Whitinger, the west half of the northeast quarter of section 24, township 17, range 3, and the northwest quarter 
of section 19, township 17, range 4.
John West, the west half of the northwest quarter of section 28, township 17, range 4. 
Abraham Whitinger, one hundred and nineteen acres in the northwest and northeast quarters of section 30, township 
17, range 3, and eighty-one acres west of river, in the west half of the northeast quarter of section 25, same township.
Francis Whitinger, one hundred and thirty-nine acres in the northeast quarter of section 15, township 16, range 4. 
Polly Wright, the west half of the northwest quarter of section 12, township, 16, range 3. 
Jacob Whitinger, the southwest quarter of section 19, township 17, range 4; the east half of the southeast quarter of 
section 24, township 17, range 3; the west half of the southeast quarter of section 23, same township, and sixty-seven
acres in the west half of the southwest quarter of section 15, township 16, range 3.
Francis Williamson, the west half of the northwest quarter of section 2, township 16, range 3. 
James McIlvain, Sr., was born in 1767 in Virginia, and moved from there to Kentucky, thence to Ohio, settling in each 
of those States. In the spring of 1821 he emigrated to Marion County, with his wife and several children, settling at
Indianapolis, where he remained a short time, then moved into this township, settling on the land now owned by his son,
S. H. Mcllvain, and the heirs of Uriah Hildebrand. He was a farmer by occupation, and was the first associate judge of the
Circuit Court in the county. For years prior to his death he was a Christian, and was one of the leading men in the township.
His death occurred Aug. 13, 1833.
James Mcllvain, Jr., was born near Lexington, Ky., in the year 1798, and from there went to Ohio, and thence to this 
county with his parents, and settled where the city of Indianapolis now is in the spring of 1821. Subsequently he settled
where North Indianapolis now is, and lived there till his death, April 5, 1848. By occupation he was a farmer, and he was
one of the most extensive stock traders ever in this county. He was a man of great intelligence, shrewd and energetic.
He was a member of the Christian Church for twenty-five years before his death. He was county commissioner many
years ago, serving as such two terms. S. H. Mcllvain is his only child now living.
Henry Kimberlain was born in Hagerstown, Md., in 1766, and, on reaching manhood, went to Kentucky, where he was 
married to Olivira Patterson. Subsequently he came to Harrison County, Ind., where he resided a few years, and in 1821
came with his wife and ten children to this township, and entered land now owned by William Whitesell's heirs, half a mile
north of where Allisonville now is. He lived there until 1826, when he died. He was a farmer all his life, and a member of
the Methodist Episcopal Church for many years prior to his death. He was a good, industrious citizen. Of the ten children,
but one is living, Sarah Ann, who lives in Hamilton County, this State. The first preacher who preached in the neighborhood
of Mr. Kimberlain's was Joel Cravens, about 1824, when the circuit extended from Pendleton to Morgan County.
John C. Kimberlain, a son of Henry Kimberlain, was born in Kentucky in 1797, and came to this township with his parents 
in the year 1821. He never married, and was a farmer all his life, and a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church from
boyhood. He died about 1844.  
Jacob L. Kimberlain, son of Henry Kimberlain, was born in Kentucky about 1803. He came here with his parents in 1821 
and located with them, where he lived till he was married to Nancy Butler. He lived in this county several years, then
moved to Hamilton County, Ind., where he lived twelve years, and thence went in 1861 to Iowa, where he died in 1864.
His wife died the same year. He was a minister of the Methodist Church for many years.
John Kimberlain was born in Kentucky in March, 1800. He came to this township in 1821, and entered eighty acres one 
half-mile northeast of where Allisonville now is. He owned it but a short time, — worked on the Wabash Canal, and was
a contractor in the work. He lived in this county seven years, and died at Anderson, Ind., in 1840.
Fielding Clark came to this township a single man from Bracken County, Ky., about 1822, and settled on eighty acres now
owned by Joshua Spahr, which he paid for by clearing laud. About 1830 he sold the eighty acres to John Nesbit, and
entered two hundred acres just north of the old home place. He lived there sixteen years and went to Missouri, where he
died about 1879. He was a farmer.
Thomas Brunson was born July 8, 1760, in Pennsylvania. He came to this township in 1826 from Kentucky, and entered 
eighty acres, now owned by Rev. R. D. Robinson. He followed farming all his life, and lived there till his death, in 1839. He
was the father of William, Robert, and Jonathan Brunson, and of four other children.
William Brunson was born April 8, 1795. He married Martha Allison, and with her and four children — Madison, Hulda, 
Jane, and Jefferson — came to this township in the year 1825, and entered one hundred and twenty acres, now owned
by Erastus Brunson and John Bear. He was a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church for twenty years prior to his
death, which occurred in the year 1876. In all he had eight children, five of whom grew up to manhood and womanhood,
and three of whom are now living, namely, Madison, Erastus, and Armelda. They all have families and live in this township.  
Robert Brunson was born Feb. 22, 1797, in Kentucky, and came to this township in the year 1825. He entered one 
hundred and sixty acres, now owned by his son Leonidas. He married Jennie Allison, whom, together with their daughter,
Malinda, he brought with him. Mr. Brunson was the father of five children, three of whom are living, viz., Malinda, who
married Anthony Williams, from Kentucky. She is now a widow, and and lives in Cicero. Leonidas and Caroline live on the
old place. Mr. Bronson was a farmer; a moral and industrious man.
Jonathan Brunson, son of Thomas Brunson, was born in Harrison County, Ky., April 8, 1801. He was married there to 
Mary Ann Henry, and in October, 1826, came from that State to this township with his wife and son, Asher. He entered
one hundred and sixty acres, now owned by that son. He lived there until 1849, then went to Allisonville, where he lived
until his death, Sept. 12, 1859. He followed farming all his life, and was industrious, moral, and frugal. He was a member
of the Christian Church for twenty-five years prior to his death. He was the father of eight children. His widow, now
seventy-seven years of age, is still living in the township on the old homestead with her son Asher.
Jacob Ringer, Sr., was born in the year 1757. He came from Maryland, bringing his wife and one child with him to this 
township, in 1824, with a Lutheran colony, and settled on land now owned by Perry Rhodes. His wife died there in 1842,
and Mr. Ringer then lived with his children till his death. He was a Lutheran for many years. The daughter who came
here with him was named Lydia. She subsequently married Hezekiah Smith, Jr., and lived in the township many years.
She died at Cicero, Ind.
Peter Negley was born in Pennsylvania in the year 1777. He moved to Hamilton County, Ohio, and thence, in March, 
1823, emigrated to this township, and settled on Fall Creek, where Millersville now is. He brought from Ohio with him
his wife and nine children, — four sons and five daughters, — as follows: John, George H., David, Jacob, Elizabeth, Katie,
Eva, Sarah, and Margaret. Of these children all are dead except Sarah (now Mrs. Mcintosh), who lives in Greene County,
Ind. He purchased four eighty-acre tracts of land, and, in partnership with Seth Bacon, built the first mill at Millersville.
He also founded the village of Millersville. He followed milling a short time, and then farming the remainder of his life.
He was a Universalist in belief, and a moral, industrious, and respected citizen. He died at Millersville, Aug. 6, 1847.
His wife survived him four years.
Elijah Dawson was born in Virginia in 1781. His wife's maiden name was Mary Ann Hardin. He emigrated to Kentucky, 
lived there two years, and went to Dearborn County, Ind., from whence he came to this township in 1823, and settled
on the land now owned by his son Ambrose, and where he resided till his death, in 1858. He was of Baptist persuasion,
but not a member of the church. He was strictly moral and temperate in all his habits; was an industrious and valuable
citizen, and good neighbor, and he was never at law. He raised seven sons to be sober, moral, good citizens. In all there
were ten children, named Squire, Matthias, Uriah, Isabel, Ambrose, Mary Ann, Charles, Amanda, Andrew, and Jackson.
The first three named and Mary Ann are dead; Amanda lives in Knoxville, Tenn., the wife of Joseph Schofield; Andrew
lives in Cowles Co., Kansas. The remainder are highly-respected citizens of this township. There are several families of
Dawsons, all descendants of this one family, now living in the township.
Squire Dawson, the eldest son of Elijah and Mary Ann Dawson, was born in Lawrenceburg, Ind., in 1807. He came to 
this township with his parents in 1823. He was an exhorter and member of the Christian Church. He raised a large
family of children, of whom two are now living. He died in 1871.
Jacob Coil, Sr., was born in Hamilton County, Va., about 1790. He was of German descent. He emigrated to Fayette 
County, Ohio, where he lived several years, and from there came to this township with his family, consisting of wife
and several children, in the year 1823, and settled on eighty acres now owned by James Bridges. In 1835 he moved
to near Broad Ripple, and died there in the fall of 1837. By occupation he was a farmer. He was moral and industrious,
and in business a persevering man. He took an active interest in all matters pertaining to the public good. He followed
the burning of lime for several years during his residence in this township, obtaining the rock for the purpose out of
the bed of White River. He burned many thousands of bushels of lime every year. Most of the lime used in the building
of the old State-house was burned by him. He married Barbara Colip, and was the father of eight children, four of whom
he raised to maturity. Two are living, viz., Casandra, the wife of Swartz Mustard, who lives in Broad Ripple, and Sabina,
the wife of Lewis H. Rickard, who resides in Norton County, Kansas.
William Crist came to the township from Whitewater in 1824, and settled on land now owned by William Schofield, just 
north of Malott Park. He served through the war of 1812, and was severely wounded in the service. He with his family
went to Iowa about 1842.
Jonas Huffman was born in Virginia, and from there went to Kentucky, where he settled for some time. He then went 
to Ohio, and from there emigrated to this township with his family about 1824, and entered one hundred acres on White
River. The land is now owned by James Huffman, his son. He was a carpenter by trade, but followed farming for a
livelihood. He was a moral, upright citizen, and took especial interest in all laudable public enterprises. He lived on the
old homestead till his death, in 1861. His wife died in 1856. They were the parents of nine children, seven of whom, —
four sons and three daughters, — became men and women.
Thomas A. Long was born in Carlisle, Nicholas Co., Ky., about 1796. He emigrated to this township about 1824 with his 
wife (formerly Peggy McClanahan) and two children, and entered eighty acres, now owned by Mrs. Mary A. Woollen.
He is a blacksmith by trade, and is now living in Howard County, Ind., where he went about 1844. For sixty years he
has been a member of the Presbyterian Church, and was one of the first and leading members of the old Washington
Presbyterian Church. In Howard County he served as associate judge of the Circuit Court, and afterwards as a justice
of the peace for many years. He is an influential business man; raised a large family, and they are all good citizens and
wealthy.
John Johnson was born and raised in Kentucky, and emigrated to Indiana, and first settled on Whitewater, near 
Brookville, where he remained till 1824, when he came to this township with his wife (Louisa Dawson) and two
children (Louisa and Oliver), and settled on one hundred and sixty acres of land now known as the G. H. Voss farm,
where he continued to reside till his death. He followed farming all his life, and was a moral, upright man, and a valuable
citizen. He was always kind to the poor, and helped those around him as much as his circumstances would allow. He died
about 1858, at the age of fifty-six years.
Joseph Culbertson was born in Franklin County, Pa., in 1766, and emigrated to Kentucky, where he lived till 1829, when 
he came to this township with wife and family, and settled on land now owned by William Culbertson, his son, where he
died in 1850. He was a member and the founder of the Washington Presbyterian Church, which was built on his farm.
He was an elder in that church. He took special interest in the schools and the public high-ways, and was a promoter
of all worthy enterprises. In all he had eleven children, two of whom are living, William Culbertson and Esther Jane
Hahn, the latter of whom resides in Maryland.
John Nesbit was born in Bourbon County, Ky., in 1782, and with wife and eight children emigrated to this township in 
1829. He bought eighty acres of land (now owned by Joshua Spahr), and entered eighty acres adjoining. He was a farmer,
a member of the Presbyterian Church about thirty years, and an elder and trustee of the Washington Presbyterian
Church. His wife's maiden name was Mary McClure. She died in October, 1835. Mr. Nesbit died in August of the same
year. There were three sons and five daughters. Joanna and William A. died single, Nancy T. is the widow of A. G. Ruddle,
M.D., M. J. is the widow of Henry B. Evans, Margaret married Daniel R. Smith, and Eliz. E. married John P. Moore.
Joseph A. Nesbit, son of John and Mary Nesbit, was born in 1821 in Kentucky. He emigrated to this township with his 
parents, with whom he lived until their death, in 1835. He then went to Kentucky and remained one year, when he
returned to Allisonville, where he lived on a farm until 1841. He then attended school at Centreville, Ind., for two years,
after which he taught school during the winter months and farmed during the summer till the winter of 1846. He then
began the study of medicine with Dr. Charles Ray, and during the winter of 1848-49 he attended Jefferson Medical
College at Philadelphia. He located at Allisonville, and practiced medicine till 1856, when he took the second course of
 lectures in the above-named college, and in March, 1857, graduated. Since that time he has been a prominent and
successful practitioner of medicine at Allisonville. On the 22d of July, 1858, he married Margaret Sterrett. Dr. Nesbit
has been a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church for nine years, and he is a member of Keystone Lodge, No. 251,
of F. and A. M. In politics he is a Republican.
Thomas McClintock, who was an early settler in Marion County, and lived for several years nearly on the line of 
Washington and Centre townships, was a son of Joseph McClintock, who emigrated from Maryland to Kentucky, and
settled at Hinkston Station, in a block -house built for defense against Indians. In that house Thomas was born in 1788.
The family afterwards moved to Harrison County, Ky., near Cynthiana, whence, in November, 1829, he emigrated to
Indianapolis, coming at the solicitation of the Rev. William R. Morehead, a Presbyterian clergyman, who had previously
come to Indianapolis from Kentucky. Thomas McClintock lived in the town during the winter following his arrival, and
in the spring of 1830 moved out about one mile to the Johnson farm, where he remained one year, and then removed
to lands which he had purchased at Sugar Flat, where he died in September, 1837.
Thomas McClintock was a life-long member of the Presbyterian Church. He had three sons and two daughters. Of the 
latter, Rebecca died about 1853, and Martha is now living in Greensburg, Decatur Co., Ind. The mother died at her
daughter Martha's house about 1873. Of the sons, Joseph is living in California, Thomas J. died about 1853, in Marion
County. The other son, William H. McClintock, was born in the old block-house at Hinkston Station, Ky., March 13,
1813, and moved with his father's family to Harrison County, Ky., and thence to Indianapolis. He lived with the family
till his father's death, and after that event owned eighty of the one hundred and sixty acres of his father's farm at Sugar
Flat. In 1873 he sold out and moved to Indianapolis, where he remained eight years. . In 1881 he bought a house and
land at Mapleton (about a half-mile from his father's homestead), and is now living there. At the age of fourteen years
he joined the Presbyterian Church at Stonermouth meeting-house Bourbon County, Ky. In January, 1843, he married
Sarah Ann Mattox, near Booneville, Union Co., Ind. His wife being a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church,
induced him to leave the Presbyterians and join the Methodists, and he is now one of the most prominent members
of the church of that denomination at Mapleton. He reared three sons, viz.: Thomas A. (now a class-leader in the
Mapleton Church), Edmund A., also a member of the same church, and living at San Jose, Cal., and William D., who joined
his mother's church at the age of nine years, afterwards studied medicine with Dr. Harvey, of Indianapolis, and located
in practice in Kansas, where he died in December, 1880.
An examination of the list of tax-payers of 1829 shows that of the Allison family, for whom Allisonville is named, there 
only remains in this township William, son of John Allison. There remain in this township of the children of Abraham
Bowen, Peter, James, and Abraham, Jr., all honorable citizens and farmers. James is, in addition to farming, engaged
in merchandising at the town of Nora. Of the Brunson families there remain Erastus and Madison, sons of William,
and Asher and Noble, the sons of Jonathan Brunson. Leonidas, the son of Robert Brunson, is yet living in this township.
Of Hiram Bacon's family there are still living here Mrs. C. A. Howland and William Bacon. George and Hiram, Jr., live
in Shelby County, Ind. Mrs. B. F. Tuttle, daughter of Hiram Bacon, lives in Indianapolis. Of William Bacon's family
there remains a grandson (John Strange), a very prosperous and wealthy young farmer. Of James Bunnell's family,
Reuben is still living here, a prosperous and honored citizen, having served several terms as township trustee. Robert
Barnhill is still living. D. Bowers has two daughters and one son living in this township. Of Jacob Coil's family there are
still living in this township two daughters, Mrs. Volney Dawson and Mrs. Hamilton Thompson. William Crist, so often
elected constable in the early history of this township, has no descendants left. He, in addition to serving as constable,
was or had been quite an Indian-fighter. It is said by his niece, Mrs. Gerard Blue, who is still living here, that Mr. Crist,
in the early settling of this county, went with two of his neighbors to the mills on White Water, in the eastern part of
the State, and on their way back they were attacked by the Indians in ambush. The two neighbors were both killed
and Crist severely wounded, but holding on to his horse he was enabled to make his escape. He had during his life on
the frontier received eighteen bullet-wounds from Indian guns.
Of the De Ford family there remains only George W., son of William De Ford. He is an honorable farmer and good 
citizen. Of Elijah Dawson's family, Ambrose, Charles Jackson, and Mrs. Isabella Culbertson, the mother of Alexander
Culbertson, or, as he is familiarly called, Squire Culbertson. Ambrose Dawson is one of this township's best and most
honored citizens, and has been a very successful farmer. A few years since he divided his property to his children,
giving all of them a good farm, and in his old age and declining years has the pleasure of seeing his children all well
started in life. Charles Dawson is, in addition to being the wealthiest citizen of this township, an honorable gentleman.
He has a large family of children, all of whom are at home except the eldest daughter, who is married to Dr. Collins.
Matthias Dawson, one of Elijah's sons, has been dead about six years. His son, W. M., is now living in, this township,
and also two young sons by a second wife. Jackson Dawson, son of Elijah, is still living in this township, and is one of
its best citizens, a successful farmer and honorable citizen.
Of the heirs of James Ellis there remains in this township Alfred Ellis. Of John Fox there remains his son, Raney Fox, 
a wealthy farmer. Of the Noah Flood family there remains here Mrs. Gerard Rlue, with a family of four children, —
one son, William J. Blue, and three daughters. The oldest daughter was the wife of G. W. Lancaster. She died in 1875,
leaving one son, Edwin G., and one daughter, Dovie. The second daughter is the wife of L. G. Akin; the third daughter
is the wife of C. G. King. Of the heirs of John Johnson there remain Luther, Oliver, and John V. Johnson, all very
successful farmers, honorable citizens, and intelligent men. Luther has a family of two sons and three daughters,
all at home except the eldest daughter, Mrs. Amos Butterfield. Oliver Johnson has three sons — James, Silas H., and
Frank P. — and one daughter, Mrs. Mary Lowe, wife of W. A. Lowe, an attorney-at-law. Silas H. and Frank P. are living
in this township, and are intelligent, honest young farmers. John V. Johnson is a bachelor, a very successful farmer, and
good citizen. Mrs. Ambrose Dawson (deceased), Mrs. Jackson Dawson, Mrs. W. M. Dawson, and Mrs. Hiram Haverstick
are daughters of John Johnson.
Of James McCoy's heirs there remains Mrs. Richard Hope. Of James Mcllvain's family only S. H. McIlvain, a successful 
farmer, remains. Of Edmond Newby's family there remains Mrs. George Stipp. Of Jacob Roberts' heirs there remains
only Mrs. William Scott. Of the heirs of David Ray there are in this township Mrs. Jacob Whitesel, Mrs. Jane McCoy,
and another married daughter. Of the heirs of David Sharpe there remains William H. Sharpe, a wealthy farmer and
successful business man. Of the heirs of John Shields there are John Shields, Jr., a successful farmer and thorough
business man, and Mrs. Jane Dodd, wife of Peter Dodd. Of the heirs of Daniel R. Smith, generally known as Judge Smith,
there remains John H. Smith, an intelligent farmer and one of our honored citizens, having served two terms as township \
trustee and one term as county commissioner, which term expired Nov. 1, 1883. He is known as a careful, painstaking
man in all of his business transactions, both public and private. To him the writer of this brief history of Washington
township feels under lasting obligations for counsel and assistance in the administration of a public office. Mrs. Dr.
Woollen and Mrs. W. W. Woollen are both daughters of Daniel R. Smith. Of the heirs of Cornelius Van Scyoc there only
remains his granddaughter, Mrs. James Mustard, and daughter of Lorenzo Van Scyoc, who was a son of Cornelius. Isaac
Whitinger's widow is still living in this township, being now the Widow Kinsley. Henry Whitinger, son, and Mrs. Mary
Newby, daughter, of Isaac Whitinger, are living in this township. Of Joel Wright's family there remains his son, Emsley,
an attorney-at-law and extensive farmer, and the oldest settler in the township now living. Mrs. Jincy Osborn is also
a daughter of Joel Wright. James T. Wright, an old citizen of this township, is a grandchild, as are also Mrs. Mary
Johnson and John Wright.
Of other old settlers who have come to this township since 1829 may be mentioned Dr. J. A. Nesbit, who lives at 
Allisonville, a successful practicing physician, and also a large farmer. Jacob S. and James Mustard, who are among
the old settlers, are both honored and intelligent citizens. James, the younger of the two brothers, has a national
reputation as a breeder of the best strains of Poland China swine, has also served as township trustee, and is in
every particular an excellent citizen. R. R. and Thomas C. Hammond are also among the esteemed citizens and
wealthy farmers of the township. Benjamin Tyner is another intelligent, successful old settler. James Parsley is
an old settler here, a successful business man, and a good citizen.
Among the oldest and best citizens of the township are the Hessong family, — John J., M. L., H. M., George, and Charles. 
Thomas and Jacob Sutton are old settlers here. Jacob Whitesel came to this township in 1835, and is one of its best
citizens. He has a large family of sons and daughters, most of them yet at home.
The Blue family is among the oldest of the township. There are now in this township Uriah and George, sons of the late 
Benjamin Blue, both intelligent, upright farmers; Mrs. S. H. Mcllvain is also daughter of Benjamin Blue. Mrs. Elizabeth
F., widow of Peter Blue, has a large family of sons and daughters, most of whom are at home. C. A. Howland, a wealthy
and honored citizen, who has represented this county in the Legislature, served as county commissioner, and filled
numerous places of trust in this township and county, is living here. Isaac Bomgardner is among the prosperous and
thorough - going citizens. William Bradley is another of the substantial citizens.
The sons of Daniel Pursel are among the best citizens. Samuel, O. J., and J. O. are all living here, prosperous and 
thorough farmers. James Hubbard, aged ninety-nine years, who is probably the oldest person living in Marion
County, lives here. He is hale and healthy, works regularly, and converses with intelligence on any subject with
which he has ever been familiar.
There are no manufactories in Washington township, nor any very important towns or villages. Broad Ripple and 
Wellington villages, on White River, in the central part of the township, are the most important. Malott Park,
Millersville, and Allisonville are villages in the eastern and southeastern part of the township. Mapleton is on the
south line, adjoining Centre township, part of the village being in Centre.
Nora is a village in the northern part of the township, having a railroad station on the Chicago AirLine, a post-office, 
two general country stores, two black smith -shops, and a population of about one hundred and fifty.
Sutton's Corners, also located in the north part of the township, has a school-house (No. 11), one general store, a 
blacksmith-shop, a drain-tile factory, and a sub-post-office, which receives and distributes mail-matter for and from
Nora.
Broad Ripple village is situated seven miles north of Indianapolis, on White River, and the Chicago and Indianapolis 
Air-Line Railroad. It was laid out into forty-eight lots by Jacob Coil, on April 20, 1837. It was so called from the fact
that the ripple in the river at that point was the largest and widest in the country, and the place was known by that
name from the time of the first settlement. The town is just south of the feeder-dam of the old Wabash and Erie Canal,
which was begun in 1837, and finished in 1839, by John Burke, contractor. About two-thirds of the original town, as
laid out, has been thrown back into farming land. At present the town contains only one water-mill, one railroad depot,
and a few dwelling-houses, with a population of thirty-five.
The first merchant of the village was Robert Earl; the second was Zachariah Collins; the third was William Earl; and the 
last one was Joseph Ray, who left the business in 1860.
Dr. Harvey Kerr, the first physician, was there from 1851 to 1880. The present physician is Dr. R. C. Light. The first 
postmaster was William Earl, who took charge of it about 1850 for a time, and it went to Wellington, and afterwards
returned to Broad Ripple, when William Earl again kept it for a short time. The office is now called Broad Ripple, but is
kept in Wellington.
About 1843, John Burk built a saw-mill on White River, just below the feeder-dam, and operated it till 1845, when Peter 
W. Koontz became a partner, and together they operated it till 1851, when it was abandoned and torn down. In 1845,
near the same place, John Burk and Peter W. Koontz built a grist-mill, and operated it till 1847, when the former sold
to the latter, and Abraham Koontz became a partner. About 1851, Peter W. Koontz died. The mill then passed into the
possession of Abraham H. Turner, who operated it until about 1853. Mr. Fairbanks then rented it, and operated it one
year. In the fall of 1855 the ownership again became vested in Abraham Koontz. He ran it a while, and Samuel W.
Hetsellgesser became partner, and together they operated it till the spring of 1862. William Craig and George A.
Kirkpatrick then bought it, and operated it three or four years, when the former retired, and Mr. Kirkpatrick operated
it till it was washed away by the great freshet in 1875. Shortly afterwards Mr. Kirkpatrick built a new mill where it now
stands (being several rods down the river from the place where the old mill stood), and operated it until 1880, when
Harrison Sharp and Samuel Sheets became the owners by purchase at sheriff's sale, and they still own it. The water
supply is furnished by the feeder-dam, as it has been from the beginning.
Wellington village is situated on White River, seven miles north of Indianapolis, on the opposite bank of the old Wabash 
and Erie Canal from Broad Ripple. It was laid out into thirty two lots by James A. Nelson and Adam R. Nelson on May
17, 1837, and so named in honor of the Duke of Wellington. A part of the original town has gone back into farming lands,
yet it is something of a village. It contains one store, a blacksmith-shop, a post-officer, called Broad Ripple, an Odd-
Fellows' lodge, and a Union Church; also the township graded school. The present population is one hundred and eight.
The first merchant was William Switzer, and after him came the following in the order named, viz.: Reed Hardin, 
Gurdon C. Johnson, Swartz Mustard, Jackson Dawson, Oliver P. Johnson, Samuel Sheets (who kept there longer than
all the rest, from 1866 till 1882), and Reuben and Hillary Morris. The last two named are in partnership, and are the
present merchants.
The first physician was Dr. Atler, and the following named came after him in the order named, viz.: Horatio Johnson, 
Edward Collins, W. B. Culbertson, and Joseph B. Bates. The last named is the present physician. The present postmaster
is Hillary Morris.
Broad Ripple Lodge, No. 548, I. 0. 0. F., was instituted June 2, 1877, the following named being the original members, 
viz.: Austin Bradley, George Parsley, James Garrity, Piatt Whitehead, John McCormick, James Mustard, John W.
Stipp, N. M. Hessong, Frank McCormick, Levi Johnson. In June, 1881, the Castleton Lodge was consolidated with
this. The Broad Ripple Lodge is the most prosperous one of the order in Marion County outside of Indianapolis. It has
a good two-story building for lodge purposes, built in the village of Wellington, at a cost of about one thousand dollars.
Its membership now numbers eighty-three. The present officers of the lodge are Platt Whitehead, N. G.; Isaac N.
Jackson, V. G.; Henry Whittinger, Treas.; Lewis Aiken, Sec.; Trustees, Hillary Morris, James McCoy, Daniel Stanley.
This lodge meets every Saturday evening in their hall at Wellington.
The village of Millersville, situated north and west of Fall Creek, seven miles north-northeast of Indianapolis, was 
never formally laid out. The ground was never platted, but was sold in lots of from about one-fourth of an acre to one
acre. The ground upon which the town is located was owned as follows: That portion north of the road running east
and west, by Peter Negley; that portion situated east of the old Pendleton State road and south of Cross-roads, by
G. G. F. Boswell; and that portion embraced in the triangle, by Brubaker and Speaker. The existence of the town dates
back to the year 1838. There are eighteen lots of land embraced in the town, and the present population is eighty-six.
The first merchant was Ira Thayer, who owned the merchandise, and James K. Knight kept the store for him. The 
following merchants came after him, viz.: James G. Featherston, William Sheets, George Webb, Ad. Ehrisman, George
Ewbanks, and Lewis Kern. The last named is the present merchant.
William J. Millard, Sr., was the first postmaster, appointed about forty years ago. During the last twenty years there 
has been a post-office there only one year, and then (about four years ago) it was kept by Lewis Kern. James G.
Featherston had the office for several years prior to 1859. Mrs. Mary F. Ringer had it for a short time about 1864.
The first physician was Dr. Ducat, who remained only one year. G. M. Shaw, John W. Bolus, and others have located
there since. John V. Bower is the present physician.
A great deal of business was transacted in the place prior to 1860, but since that time the trade has decreased, and the 
village has retrograded continually. The village now contains fourteen dwelling-houses, one blacksmith-shop, a Masonic
Hall building, two business houses, and one (water) flouring- and grist-mill. The post-office, when kept in the village, was
called Millersville, but when kept by Elijah James, two miles west, was called Hammond's, and afterwards James' Switch.
The residents of the village receive their mail at present from the Malott Park post-office. The place where the village
of Millersville now is was called Brubaker's Mill before it gained its present name, which was nearly a half-century ago.
In the year 1824, Seth Bacon and Peter Negley formed a partnership for the purpose of building and operating a saw-
mill on Fall Creek, near where Millersville now is. The mill was built, and the dam they erected was nearly one-fourth
of a mile east of the present mill building, and it backed the water up against Daniel Ballenger's mill, which stood just
below where the present mill-dam stands. Ballenger's mill was a frame structure, but so badly erected that it was
insecure. In consequence of the injuries sustained because of the back water, Ballenger sued Bacon & Negley for
damages. Bacon was worth nothing, and Negley compromised the case at a sacrifice of two eighty-acre tracts of land
and his mill, which stood upon one of the eighty acres, two horses, and a wagon. John Essary was Ballenger's lawyer and
ran the mill from 1826 for six years, when Noah Leverton bought Ballenger out and erected a grist-mill where the
present one stands, which is a few rods west of where the old saw-mill stood. Leverton cut the present race and built a
dam a few feet below the present one. The charter for the present dam was granted in the year 1836 by the Circuit
Court, William W. Wick presiding, the dam to be not more than four and a half feet above low-water mark in the place
where it then stood, designated by certain marks named. A jury was empaneled and damages assessed for injury to the
property. Ballenger, after selling out, went with his family to the Wabash and Erie Canal, and subsequently to Stillwell,
Ohio, his place of birth. Mr. Leverton operated the mill about three years, and sold to Chauncey True and Samuel True.
These men put two run of burrs in the mill and did a good business. The Trues owned the mill until Sept. 23, 1839, and
sold to Jacob Brubaker, and went to Michigan and engaged in farming. Brubaker built a still-house adjoining the mill,
and owned the property three years. On Aug. 8, 1842, he deeded the property to Christ. Haushey and went to parts
unknown.
Mr. Haushey was a resident of Pennsylvania, and never lived here. He owned the property one year and then died. 
After his death, Jacob Spahr bought the mill and operated it until 1848. About that time William Winpenny and Jacob
Spahr formed a partnership, rebuilt the mill aud distillery, and operated them until May 10, 1855. The partnership was
then dissolved, and Mr. Winpenny continued the business until his death, in 1861. He did a large custom business,
operating two wheat-burrs and two corn-burrs, one of which was used to grind the corn for mash to be used in the
distillery. At no time during its history was it more successfully managed than when owned by Mr. Winpenny. After his
death it was owned by his heirs and operated by various parties until Oct. 21, 1872, when it was sold to Tobias
Messersmith, since which time Jacob J. Ringer, William Sala, and John Carlisle have in turn purchased it, but each
time the ownership reverted to Tobias Messersmith. In April, 1883, it was sold at sheriff''s sale, and purchased by
N. S. Russell, of Massillon, Ohio, and is now being operated by William H. Spahr. The mill has been destroyed by fire
three times, the first time when owned by Brubaker; again about the year 1848, when owned by Jacob Spahr; and
again in August, 1878, when owned by John Carlisle. The mill was rebuilt at once by Mr. Carlisle, supplied with all the
latest improved machinery, and contains the only genuine buckwheat-bolt in the county. The mill-seat comprises
seventy-one acres. The building is a substantial structure, and the water-power ample for four run of burrs at all
seasons of the year. The property has been a source of annoyance and a continual expense to every person that
has had anything to do with it. A still-house, with a capacity of eight barrels per day, was built adjoining the grist-mill
on the south by Messrs. Spahr & Winpenny, about the year 1849, and the business carried on four or five years, when
it was suspended, and the still removed by Mr. Winpenny.
Millersville Lodge, No. 126, F. and A. M. This lodge was instituted at Millersville by dispensation granted by A. C. 
Downey, Grand Master, on March 3, 1852. The first meeting of the lodge was held, March 6, 1852, at the residence of
William J. Millard, Jr. The charter was granted by the Grand Lodge May 25, 1852, the following named being the charter
members: William J. Millard, Jr., Jonah F. Lemon, Jacob Spahr, William J. Millard, Sr., Hiram Haverstick, William Bacon,
Joseph A. Nesbit, John R. Anderson. The first meeting under the charter was held May 29, 1852.
The lodge held its meetings for some time in the upper story of the grist-mill, in a room fitted up for it. Subsequently 
they moved to the new hall, which was dedicated Oct. 26, 1853, by A. M. Hunt, proxy of the M. W. Grand Master.
The oration was by Thomas H. Lynch. The following persons have served as Worshipful Master the number of years
noted, viz.: William J. Millard, Jr., 9 years; Samuel Cory, 13 1/2 years; W. H. Hornaday, 1 year; Robert Johnson, 4 years;
W. W. Henderson, 2 years; John W. Negley, 1 year; B. W. Millard, 1 year.
The following have served as secretary the number of years noted, viz.: William Winpenny, 1 year; Samuel Cory, 8 years; 
William J. Millard, Jr., 2 years; James G. Featherston, 2 years; Lewis Y. Newhouse, 6 1/2 years; Peter L. Negley, 1 year;
W. W. Henderson, 6 years; Joseph E. Boswell, 1 year; W. H. Hornaday, 2 years; A. Culbertson, 2 years.
The following is an exhibit of the lodge since its organization: number deceased, 11; number expelled, 2; number 
suspended, 7; number demitted, 61; number of present members, 32. Robert Johnson is the present Worshipful Master,
and W. W. Henderson is the secretary. Four of the charter members are now living, namely, William J. Millard, Jr.,
Jonah F. Lemon, Hiram Haverstick, and Joseph A. Nesbit. This lodge meets in its hall in Millersville on the Saturday
evening of or before the full moon in each month.
Valentine Lodge, No. 1390, Knights of Honor, was instituted at Millersville by dispensation on Feb. 18, 1879, by David 
M. Osborn, Deputy Grand Dictator. The following were the charter members, viz.: William H. Wheeler, William W.
Foster, William H. Hornaday, William H. Spahr, Frederick Karer, Henry G. Gerstley, John P. Goode, George W. White,
Frederick Steinmier, Henry C. Greene, John H. Wineow, Thomas Doyle, William H. Negley, A. A. Vangason, George W.
Winpenny, and Jacob Volmer. The lodge was duly chartered by the Grand Lodge Oct. 9, 1879. The following have served
as Dictators of the lodge: W. W. Foster, John P. Goode, William H. Spahr, William H. Wheeler, William H. Heath, John
V. Bower, Thomas T. Lankford.  
The following named are the officers for the year 1884: John W. House, Dictator; William H. Wheeler, Treasurer; 
Silas Tyner, Reporter. John V. Bower is the representative to the Grand Lodge. William A. Schofield, John V. Bower,
and Jacob Stiltz are the present trustees. The number of members in good standing at present is twenty-five. The
lodge meets every two weeks on Saturday evenings in the Winpenny Hall in Millersville.
The Millersville Free Library was made up by subscription, and was opened to the public June 1, 1882. It contains five 
hundred and fifty-five volumes of the most judiciously selected books. Many of the most popular magazines and
valuable papers are regularly received. In July, 1883, a library association was formed, with Hiram B. Howland as
president, W. W. Henderson secretary, and Alfred Ellis treasurer. Dr. J. V. Bower is librarian. The following are the
trustees: Albert B. Fletcher, Benjamin Tyner, William H. Wheeler, Mrs. Hettie M. Hunter, and Miss Lou Huff.
Free lectures are regularly held under the auspices of the above society, and prove to be a source of both pleasure and 
knowledge. Additional volumes will be added to the library from time to time. The liberal patronage given the library
by the citizens in the vicinity is assurance that its advantages are duly appreciated.
Allisonville is situated ten miles from Indianapolis, on the Noblesville State road, about three miles cast of north from 
Indianapolis. It was laid out into forty lots by John Allison on the 8th day of February, 1833, and the town was named
after Mr. Allison. The population at present is about fifty. The first merchants were Leven T. McCay and George Bruce,
in partnership. They kept for three years. A. G. Ruddle was the first physician, and he practiced medicine there for
forty years. At one time, some forty years ago, there were two hotels there, and they did a good business. Richard
Brown was the first hotel-keeper, and followed the business seven years. There is no post-office there, and has not
been for a great many years. Mail-matter intended for the people of the village is sent to Castleton. Lewis Droanberger
was the merchant in Allisonville many years from about 1850. The present merchant is John D. Gerstley, who has
been in the business there about thirteen years. The present physicians are Joseph A. Nesbit and Isaac N. Craig.
James Armentrout carried on a tan yard just south of the village for six years, about 1832.
Keystone Lodge, No. 251, F. and A. M., was instituted at Allisonville by dispensation Oct. 22, 1858, and the following 
officers elected: I. N. Craig, W. M.; P. A. Leaver, S. W.; Jacob W. Ray, J. W. The following were the petitioners, all of
whom became charter members, viz: I. N. Craig, Sidney Cropper, A. S. Ellis, Samuel Farley, Philip A. Leaver, Joseph
A. Nesbit, William Whitesell, John R. Anderson, E. S. Cropper, J. S. McCarty, John Tate, Samuel C. Vance, James
Farley, Samuel B. Beals, John Harvey, Stephen Harvey, Isaac Michener, F. Farley, T. P. Farley, Milon Harris, J. W.
Ray, Jacob Whitesell, George Metsker, Hiram A. Haverstick, Daniel St. John, Lewis Farley, Jacob Eller, F. M. Beck,
Isaiah Williams, Charles Whitesell, B. Todd, and John Bruce. The charter was granted by the Grand Lodge May 26,
1859. The following were elected under the charter: Isaac N. Craig, W. M.; Philip A. Leaver, S. W.; Jacob W. Ray, J. W.
For about seventeen years the lodge held its meetings in a small, inconvenient room in Allisonville. In the spring of 
1875 the lodge built a new hall in that village, at a cost of fifteen hundred and seventy-five dollars. The first meeting
held in the new hall was July 24, 1875. The building committee were Joseph A. Nesbit, Samuel Farley, Reuben Bunnel,
John H. Smith, and John John.son. The first trustees were Joseph A. Nesbit, John H. Smith, and Isaac N. Craig.
The present membership is forty-three. The following persons have served as Worshipful Masters the number of years 
noted, viz.: Isaac N. Craig, 8 years; Samuel Farley, 1 year; Thomas N. Williams, 3 years; John H. Smith, 6 years; David
D. Negley, 1 year; John Johnson, 2 years; Hillary Silvey, 3 years. Hillary Silvey is the present Worshipful Master, and
George W. Kesselring is secretary. This lodge meets in its hall in Allisonville on the Saturday evening of or after the full
moon in each month.
The village of Mapleton is on the line of Washington and Centre townships, the main street being on the township line, 
and the village being on both sides of it. It was laid out in 1871 (town plat recorded September 18th in that year). That
part of the site which is on the Washington township side was owned by John Messersmith, who purchased from Thomas
Ruark.
The first and present merchant of the place is Theodore F. Harrison. The village now contains the Methodist Episcopal 
Church edifice and parsonage, a brick school-house, in which is a graded school, one store, a post-office (Theodore F.
Harrison, post-master), a blacksmith-shop, and about three hundred inhabitants.
Malott Park, located in the eastern part of the township, was laid out in 1872 (plat recorded May 4th in that year) by 
Daniel and John H. Stewart. The first merchant was George Byers, who is also the present merchant of the town. The
first postmaster of Malott Park was Warren W. Bowles; the second was Barbara Spahr, who was succeeded by George
Byers, who is the present postmaster. The town has now one store, a post-office, a black.smith-shop, the Malott Park
station of the Wabash and Pacific Railway, one church (Methodist Episcopal), and about fifty inhabitants.
Churches of the Township. — The Washington Presbyterian Church edifice was built about the year 1838 by 
subscription, on the farm of Joseph Culbertson, now the land of William Culbertson. It was a small frame building, and
was used as a church about ten or twelve years. The building soon afterwards became dilapidated and was torn down.
It stood about one half-mile north of where Malott Park now is.
The number of members at organization was about twenty-five, among whom were the following: Hiram Bacon, 
Mary Alice Bacon, Joseph Culbertson, John Nesbit, Elizabeth Culbertson, Mary Nesbit, Paulina McClung, old Mrs.
McClung, John Johnson, Cynthia McClung, Samuel McClung, Nancy Nesbit, Margaret Nesbit, James Brown and wife,
James Gray, and Sallie Gray. John Nesbit, Joseph Culbertson, and Hiram Bacon were the first trustees.
The first preacher was John Moreland, who remained with them four years. The next was William Sickles; he remained 
with them four or five years. After which there was no regular preaching, and when services were held there it was by
transient ministers. After the place was abandoned the class went to Broad Ripple and united with the Union Church.
The Ebenezer Lutheran Church. In the year 1823 a small number of persons residing in Maryland conceived the idea 
of forming a colony and taking their departure for Indiana, hoping thereby to better their condition. They were all
Lutherans, and all related, and Abraham Reck was their pastor. They organized a colony composed of the following
persons and their families: Conrad Ringer, David Ringer, Jacob Ringer, Daniel Smay, Daniel Sharts, John Brown, Peter
Brown, Solomon Easterday, Daniel Bower, and Jacob Ringer, Sr.
Their pastor then said to them, “You are like lambs going among wolves; I will go with and take care of you." The 
colonists, determined to brave the dangers and undergo the hardships incident to a new country, started in the year
1823 for their destination. They came in wagons as far as the Ohio River, where they built a flat-boat, and on it came to
New Harmony, Ind., where they resided one year, and then came to this county and settled in the same neighborhood,
most of them in Washington, and the remainder in Lawrence township. For several years after their arrival here they
held religious services at “old man" Reek's barn, and afterwards at the residences of the new colonists, — Rev. A. Reck
officiating.
On Aug. 6, 1836, a church organization was formed under the leadership of Abraham Reck, with the following members: 
George P. Brown, Jacob Ringer, Sr., Daniel S. May, Sr., Folsom Swarm, Jacob Ringer, Jr., Conrad Ringer, Daniel Sharts,
Peter Brown, David Ringer, Daniel Bower, King English, John Brown, George Brown, Aaron Sour, Palser Sour, William
Clow, and Solomon Easterday.
The first account we have of the election of officers is that it was held on May 20, 1839, when David S. May, Sr., was 
elected elder, and Peter Brown, Jr., deacon, of the church.
The congregation built a hewed-log church near the northeast corner of the present cemetery grounds, situate about one 
half-mile east of where the Wabash, St. Louis and Pacific Railroad crosses Fall Creek, in Washington township. The
congregation held services in the log church until 1853, when they built a frame church on the site of the old log house,
and soon afterwards dedicated it. The dedicatory sermon was delivered by Rev. D. Altman, and a debt of one hundred
and seventy-five dollars was removed. From the organization, in 1836, until 1868 the following were the pastors for
the number of years noted, viz.: A. Reck, 4 years; A. A. Trimper, 3 years: Jacob Shearer, 2 years; Abraham H. Myers,
5 years; A. P. Hill, 1 year; George A. Exline, 5 years; A. J. Cramer, 5 years; Jacob Keller, 5 years.
The church was without a pastor in 1852. During Rev. Cramer's charge sixty names were added to the church-roll. 
Under the charge of Rev. George A. Exline the church experienced four revivals and began an era of great prosperity.
In the year 1868, during the pastorate of Rev. Jacob Keller, a disagreement or difficulty arose among the members, 
which finally resulted in a separation and the formation of two distinct churches. With some difficulty a committee of
two from each faction was appointed to fix upon terms of settlement. The following were appointed, viz.: John Mowry
and John Negley, in behalf of the upper, and Samuel Harper and David W. Brown in behalf of the lower, settlement.
On the 26th day of February, 1868, the committee met and agreed upon the following terms of settlement: The party
represented by Messrs. Harper and Brown to retain the Ebenezer Church building, and pay the party represented by
Messrs. Mowry and Negley the sum of three hundred and fifty dollars, in two equal installments, the first due in two
months, and the second due on Dec. 25, 1868. Messrs. Harper and Brown were to give their notes for said amounts.
The article of agreement signed and sealed by all the members of the committee on the 26th of February, 1868, and
attested by John C. Hoss, their secretary, concludes as follows:
"And the party represented by Samuel Harper and David W. Brown do hereby surrender to the party represented by 
John Mowry and John Negley all their interest in the privilege of Ebenezer Church. The committee also agree that the
ground on which the church now stands and adjoining graveyard shall be held and controlled jointly by the two parties."
This action of the committee was duly ratified by the members of the congregation, and a separation ensued. Those 
that remained and worshiped in the old church were ofiered letters, but a slight misunderstanding occurred and they
refused the proffer.
The Lower Ebenezer Lutheran Church was organized with sixty members in 1868, after the division in the Ebenezer 
Church. The congregation continued to worship in the old frame building until 1872, when the present two-story brick
edifice was completed, when they occupied it and sold the old building to George W. House, who subsequently sold it
to the Northwood Methodist Episcopal Church. The Ebenezer Church recently acquired it again and made it a parsonage.
It stands about forty rods west of the church building.
The following pastors have been with the congregation since 1868, the number of years noted, viz.: Obadiah Brown, 
7 years; David Hamma, 1 1/2 years; Henry Keller, 4 years. The last named is the present pastor. The present membership
is seventy-five.
The new brick church was dedicated to the service of God during the pastoral charge of Rev. Obadiah Brown; the Rev. 
Richards preached the dedicatory sermon.
The first elders after the separation were Samuel Harper and John A. Sargent; and the first deacons were Luther 
Johnson and Robert C. Heizer. The present elders are Luther Johnson and Luther Easterday, and the present deacons
are Samuel Harper, Silas Johnson, and Franklin Bower. Sabbath-school is held in the church every Sunday in the year.
The present superintendent is John P. Goode. The average attendance the year round is about fifty-five.
This church is situated in a wealthy neighborhood. Its members are zealous in the cause of religion, and consequently 
take an interest in all church matters, hence the church organization is exceedingly prosperous.
The Pleasant View Lutheran Church was organized on the 26th of February, 1844, with seven members, viz.; Jacob 
Schearer (pastor), Peter Hessong, George Bomgardner, David Hessong, Barbara Bomgardner, Catharine Hessong,
and Rebecca Hessong. Their meetings for worship were held at the house of Peter Hessong. In 1854 a meeting-house
was erected at Old Augusta, which was removed to Pleasant View and there rebuilt in 1863.
The first pastor of the church was Jacob Schearer, who was succeeded (in the order named) by A. H. Myers, J. Giger, 
George A. Exline, A. J. Cramer, W. G. Trester, Jacob Keller, John Boon, William H. Keeler, and the Rev. O. Brown,
who is the present pastor. The church has now forty members, and a Sabbath-school attended by fifty scholars, under the
superintendence of J. J. Hessong.
The Methodist Episcopal Church at Allisonville dates back to abojit the year 1827, when services were held by a 
preacher named Ray at the house of Mrs. Kimberlin, where and at other dwellings in the vicinity preaching continued
to be held occasionally until the building of a school-house (in 1836), which then became the preaching-place. After Mr.
Ray preaching was held by a Mr. Miller, during whose time a small class was organized. After Miller came the preachers
Berry and Smith, and after them a local preacher from North Carolina, named James T. Wright, who was somewhat
instrumental in causing their first church building to be erected. He cut the logs for the building, and hauled them himself
to a spot about half a mile east of Allisonville, where he proposed to have the church built, but the people of Allisonville,
unknown to him, hauled them to the village and raised the house on the ground where the present church stands. At about
the time the church was built they bad a preacher named Donaldson.
Afterwards came Burt, and after him Posey, who was the preacher in 1850, when the log church was destroyed by fire, 
and the present frame church was erected in its place. Among the preachers who followed Posey were Harden, Barnhart,
Grenman, Carter, Harden, McCarty, Speelman, Havens, White, Langdon, Jones, Thornton, Stalard, Jameson, Harris,
Grubbs, and Ruggles.
The Millersville Methodist Episcopal Church. For twelve years prior to the year 1846 religious services were held by the 
Methodists in the neighborhood of Millersville, at the residences of Robert Johnson, Sr., George H. Negley, David Huff,
Hillary Silvey, Gideon True, Samuel True, and in Peter Negley's barn and cooper-shop, and other places. The class held
services in an old log school-house that stood on the southeast corner of Daniel R. Smith's land, about a quarter of a mile
west of Millersville, for two years (about the years 1846 to 1848). In the year 1848 the class fitted up an old log cabin,
situate a few rods north of the cross-roads in Millersville, where they continued to worship for four years, having regular
preaching every four weeks. It was there that a church organization was formed. The number of members at organization
was about thirty-three.
The following were among the number, viz.: David Huff and wife, Elizabeth Huff, William J. Millard, Sr., and wife, Mary 
Hunter, Richard Shelly, Debba Shelly, Annual Sweeny and wife, Hillary Silvey and wife, Robert Johnson, Sr., and wife,
George H. Negley and wife, Mrs. C. G. Wadsworth, Mary Meldrum, George Day and wife, Isaac Record, Hannah Record,
Andrew McDaniel and father, John Essary and wife, Mrs. House, Debba Bacon, and Anna James. In 1853 the
congregation bought the lower story of the Masonic lodge building, and occupied it from that time until 1877.
By order of the Quarterly Conference the church property was sold in 1877, and was purchased by the Masonic lodge, 
and the church class was consolidated with Malott Park Church. This caused much dissatisfaction, and many of the
forty members belonging at the time refused to take their membership to Malott Park. Some of them went to Castleton,
a few to Allisonville, and others to Broad Ripple, while many have not held membership in any organized class since. The
following are the most prominent ministers that preached at the private houses prior to the purchase of the church, viz.:
John V. R. Miller, Meliades Miller, George Havens, Henry A. Cottingham, and McCarty. The following ministers preached
in the old log cabin, viz., James Scott and Frank Hardin. The latter was the first regular minister who preached in the new
church, and it was during his pastoral charge that the house was dedicated to the service of God. The dedicatory sermon
was delivered by Thomas H. Lyuch, on Oct. 26, 1853.
The first trustees of the church property were Hillary L. Silvey, David Huff, and Richard Shelly. The last trustees were 
Alexander Culbertson, Robert Roe, and William H. Hornaday. There has been no church organization at Millersville
since 1877; however, through the kindness of the Masonic lodge, the building formerly used as the church is at the
disposal of the citizens to be used for Sabbath-school and any kind of religious meetings free of charge. A union
Sabbath-school is carried on during the summer months only. The attendance during the past summer averaged
about sixty, and John Roberts was the superintendent. The Rev. Mr. Cobb, an Episcopalian missionary, preaches
every Sabbath evening.
The Mapleton Methodist Episcopal Church dates back to the year 1843, at which time a class was organized at the 
house of Delanson Slawson, who had come here from Switzerland County. The class then organized consisted of six
or seven members, all females, among whom were Sarah A. McCIintock, Delia Hildebrand, Hannah Blue, Mrs.
Rachel Ruark, and some of the Slawson family. Their first meetings were held at Slawson's, subsequently at the
residences of other members, and in the old log school-house of the neighborhood. Their first preachers were John L.
Smith and Luoien Berry, after whom were Frank Hardin and H. J. Meek, — then a local, but afterwards a regular
preacher on the circuit.
In the summer of 1855, Rev. H. J. Meek, assisted by George Havens, a local preacher, held a protracted meeting in the 
woods at Sugar Grove, which resulted in the formation of the Sugar Grove Methodist Episcopal Church by the Rev. Mr.
Meek; the following being the original members, viz.: James and Mary Ruark, William H. and Sarah A. McCIintock,
Pamelia Johnson, Hannah Blue, Martha F. Hammond, Joseph Ruark, Thomas Ruark, Rachel Ruark, Peter Ruark, Winnie
Ruark, Henry and Rachel Wright, John A. and Rebecca Smay, Elias Blue, Joshua and Sarah Huston, L. D. Beeler, B. F.
Slate, Pamelia A. Slate, Isaac and Susan Wheatley, Mary Willis, Mary Ann McWhorter, Deliah Hildebrand, David
Howver, Wilhelmina Beeler, Lavina Walters, Margaret Armentrout, Thomas Wright, and Susan Wright.
On the 23d of August in the same year the society met, and elected John Armstrong, Thomas H. Johns, James M. Ruark, 
John F. Hill, and S. M. Brister, trustees; and Thomas Ruark, Gerard Blue, Henry Wright, William McCIintock, and
William Roe were appointed a building committee to supervise the erection of a church edifice. Thomas Ruark donated
half an acre of ground in Sugar Grove on which to build the church, and one acre was also given by Noah Wright for
church purposes. The present parsonage stands on it. A frame building was immediately erected, at a cost of about
eight hundred dollars, and is still standing and in use, having been repaired and refitted during the past year, at a cost
of about eight hundred dollars.
The Rev. H. J. Meek continued to minister to the church for about three years after the organization, after which they 
were served by the preachers of the circuit. The present minister is the Rev. S. F. Tincher. The name of the church has
been changed from Sugar Grove to Mapleton Church, which has at the present time about fifty members.
The Methodist Episcopal Church at Malott Park was organized in 1876, with sixteen members, viz.: David Huff, Hannah 
Huff, — Huff, E. Bowles, Albert Culbertson, Margaret J. Culbertson, Charles A. Culbertson, W. H. Horaaday, Kate
Hornaday, Thomas J. Wright, Susan Wright, Clara Wright, W. D. C. Wright, Robert Roe, E. Roe, and Martha E. Roe.
Their church building was erected in 1875, and is the same that is now in use by the congregation.
The preachers who have served this church are, and have been, Amos Hanway, Thomas Wyell, J. D. Widman, Early, 
B. F. Morgan, J. S. Alley, and S. F. Tincher, the present minister in charge. The church has now about thirty members,
and connected with it is a Sabbath-school (not taught in winter), with about seventy scholars. The superintendents have
been A. Culbertson, W. D. C. Wright, and J. W. Negley.
The Broad Ripple Union Church is located in Wellington, and was erected in 1851 by subscription. John Burk was the 
principal leader in the building of the church. It is a frame structure, built by Wilson Whitesell and Richard Miller,
carpenters. Jacob C. Coil donated the land upon which the church stands. The building is in good repair, and is kept up
by the Methodists.
The first preacher was Henry Coe, a Presbyterian. The Washington Presbyterian class worshiped in the house a while, 
and afterwards a Baptist class was organized, and Madison Hume preached for them. The present Methodist class was
organized in 1852. by the Rev. Frank Hardin, who for some time was their minister. The following are the ministers who
have preached in the house regularly for the Methodists since the Rev. Hardin, viz.: Henry A. Cottingham, Barnhart,
Burch, John C. McCarty, Blake, White, Spellman, George Havens, Stallard, Longdon, Jones, Thornton, Jamison, Harvey,
C. Harris, Grubbs, and the present minister, the Rev. S. F. Tincher, of Mapleton. The present membership is thirty.
The first trustees were Jacob C. Coil and John Burk. The present trustees are Jacob C. Wright, Wm. M. Dawson, 
Hamikon Thompson, Swartz Mustard, and Isaac Morris. A Sabbath-school is held during the summer months only,
with an average attendance of fifty. Wm. M. Dawson is superintendent.
The Crooked Creek Baptist Church was organized in 1837, with fourteen original members, viz.: Madison Hume, Joseph 
Watts, Patrick Hume, Jane Hume, Esther Hume, David and Eliza Stoops, John Kinsley, Achsah Kinsley, John and Rachel
Dunn, Samuel Hutchinson, Martha Hutchinson, and Morley Stewart. Their first meetings were held in the old log
school-house near the location of the present church. Their first church edifice was built in 1842, which, having become
insufficient for the use of the congregation, was replaced by the present church building, which was erected on the same
site in 1856.
The first pastor of this church was the Rev. Madison Hume, whose successors have been Revs. Poin, A. Hume, Stewart, 
Craig, A. J. Martin, A. J. Riley, R. N. Harvey, T. J. Conner, and Lewis. The present membership is ninety-eight. Connected
with the church is a Sunday-school, with an attendance of sixty-three pupils, under the superintendency of T. F. Wakeland.
The Union Church at Nora was built in 1864. A church organization had been previously formed (in 1861), with the 
following-named members, viz.: Isaiah Applegate, James Gray, Margarette Gray, Theodosia Gray, Elizabeth Gray,
James McShane and wife, Franklin Hall and wife, Samuel Tooley and wife, Allan Stewart and wife, Henry Whitinger,
Susan Whitinger, Abraham Bowen, Ruth Bowen, Peter Lawson, Catharine Lawson, Sarah Somers, Nancy Ray,
William McCoy, Jane McCoy, Louisa Dawson, Samuel Whitinger, Ann Whitinger, Rachel Smith, Mary J. Dodd, Sally
Whitesell, William Shields, Charles Hufl"man, and Susan Wright. Meetings for worship were held in the school-house
until the erection of the church edifice, three years after the organization. The first minister to this congregation was
John McCarty, who was followed by Isaac Hardin, Henry Cottingham, and a number of other preachers. At present
there is no church organization, but a flourishing Sunday-school is kept up, with an attendance of fifty-five scholars,
under the superintendence of Mary Barr.
Schools. — There are fifteen public schools in this township, including the graded and high school at Broad Ripple. The 
school-houses are all common frame, except the school-house at Millersville, No. 2, and No. 12, in the northwest corner
of the township, which is a new brick house, built in 1881; also the new graded school-house at Broad Ripple is a
substantial brick, with rubble limestone foundation, four rooms finished in modern style, and is the best public-school
building in Marion County outside the city of Indianapolis. The cost of the building, including out-building, furniture, etc.,
was about seven thousand five hundred dollars. This graded, or high school, as it is commonly termed, was built to
accommodate the advance pupils for the entire township, and is, therefore, a township graded school. It is located at
Broad Ripple, the geographical centre of the township, and was built in 1883. The schools of Washington township are
taught seven months in the year, a term which should be increased to nine months.
Sulgrove, B. R., History of Indianapolis and Marion County, Indiana, Philadelphia:  L.H. Everts & Co., 1884, 785 pgs.,
pgs.
623-646.

1 By George W. Lancaater, Esq.


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