Street Foods
 

Street Foods with Dr A

 

Definition

 

Characteristics: comfort food

 

Around the world

Australia

 

Dubai

 

France

 

Germany

 

Indonesia

 

Italy

 

Netherlands

 

Pakistan

 

Philippines

 

Somalia

 

Switzerland

 

Thailand

 

 

 

 

 

United States

 

 

Honolulu, Hawaii

Seattle, Washington

New York, New York

 

 

 

Street Foods

with Dr A

You’re hungry and it’s 2:30 in the morning after studying for exams or a jam session or a party. Where do you go?

 

Street Food! The tastes, of course, always seem to be far better than what we can get at home or in a restaurant. Invariably, the prices are very affordable, and the service is as close as you can get to instantaneous. Sanitation is…(we’ll leave that alone for now, but I’ve lived past the US speed limit)…The quality? I can’t recall an occasion when I didn’t enjoy it. But even beyond all these positive characteristics, there was more: the time of day (usually early in the morning, before dawn!), the smells, the surroundings, the place (a deserted side street), and most especially, the company.

 

So come join me in three of my favorite adventures.

 

Bon apetit!

 

 

Australia

 

Fresh oysters in Sydney

At one hotel, they were a bit pricey at US15.00 for 6 on the half-shell, but they were succulent, sweet, and to my eyes, as big as golf balls.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dubai

 

Baklava

 

When you see the over-sized pastry trays in which this delight is created, you get an awesome feeling. Why Dubai? I happened to be traveling through during my airline days, and the General Manager of the Inflight Kitchen had just completed a grand showing of baklava to another client. So I got to taste over a dozen varieties of these heavenly dessert made for kings and queens.

 

Coffee with cardamom

And of course, to best enjoy my baklava, we had strong black coffee with cardamom seeds.

                   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

France

 

“Fishing” with a pitch fork in Normandy

I never heard of going fishing with a pitch fork. I’m no fisherman myself, but I know most fish are caught either with a net or a hook, line, and sinker.

Onion soup at Les Halles

 

Freshly shucked oysters

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Germany

 

Munich

Oktoberfest

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Indonesia

 

Tjendol

 

Tahu

 

Martabak

 

 

 

 

Gado-Gado: loosely translated, “Mix-Mix”, from Indonesia. This can be fresh fruit (my favorite) or fresh vegetables. Key ingredients: sambal (a paste ground in front of you so you can temper the “heat” of chili & salt), peanut sauce, and a fresh banana leaf so you can eat it outdoors with a giant bamboo toothpick. The street vendor always cuts up your fruit or vegetables fresh, as they cannot afford refrigeration to display them cut up. Best enjoyed on a hot summer day (I guess it’s always hot in Indonesia, so everyday!).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Italy

 

Pollo alla diavolo in Grotta Ferrata

 

Wine trip to Northern Italy

 

Wine taps in the street

 

 

The Netherlands

 

Raw eel

 

Split pea soup with ham hocks

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pakistan

 

Crabbing in Karachi harbor

 

Chapati

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Philippines

 

Fresh lumpia ubod

 

Tapsilog: 3 words made into one, that is: tapa, siningag, and itlog.

Tapa: closest translation is marinated beef jerky that is fried or heated on a skillet.

Siningag: left over rice which is fried with toasted garlic.

Itlog: Usually sunny side up, so you guessed right that this is “egg”. In Filipino. Key ingredients: fresh tomatoes, a few slices of raw onions, and raw vinegar shaken with miniature peppers. Best enjoyed after a long cramming session for exams…somehow we always ended up here around 2:00 to 3:00 in the morning.

 

 

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Somalia

 

Cold greens & onions (?)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Switzerland

 

Lucerne

Fredy Girardet’s before it closed

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thailand

 

Steamed duck

 

Fried rice with scallions

 

Mango & sticky rice

 

Thai Noodles: The street dish I was looking for sounds like “kwit-ti-yao”, and is traditionally available “heng” (dry or without sauce) or “sai nam prik” (with hot water). The white balls in the top picture are finely ground pork or beef (so I am told), and you usually get 3 or 4 in a bowl. The noodles I like (the golden brown colored ones) are not shown I this picture. Noodles are cooked extremely fast by 5 or 6 dunks in a cauldron of very hot chicken or beef stock, and served with no sidings except a small sprinkling of green onions and maybe toasted garlic. Key ingredients: more nam prik and crushed peanuts. The drinks? Always a plastic bag of oleang. This Thai version of “a Starbucks expresso” is extra strength black sweetened coffee with ice. I had no choice to make this part of my daily diet, because my bus stop coming home was right in front of a noodle hut, and that’s all they served.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Honolulu, Hawaii

Shaved Ice

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Seattle, Washington

Jack’s Fish, the Flying Fish

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ithaca, New York

School of Pomology, Steak n’ Pepper Hoagie

New York, New York

Zabar’s