14th Annual Andrew H. Green Tribute Ceremony

Please join us as we raise a toast of apple cider to Andrew H. Green, the unsung 19th century master planner, reformer, and preservationist whose accomplishments transformed New York into a world-class city. The ceremony will take place at the Andrew H. Green Memorial Bench in northern Central Park on Sunday, November 20 at 12:00n. Manhattan Borough Historian Michael Miscione will preside over the festivities. Guest speakers to be announced.

This year's ceremony has been timed to coincide with the opening of the Museum of the City of New York's exciting new permanent exhibition, New York at Its Core. The exhibition features over 400 objects and state-of-the-art interactives that capture the city's four-century history of growth and transformation. (And yes, Andrew H. Green is mentioned.) The museum is a mere 10-minute walk from the Green bench, so after (or before) the ceremony, you can head over to the MCNY to check out the new exhibit and enjoy their splashy weekend-long opening celebration. They'll offer live musical and spoken word performances, films, dance, and interactive experiences for the entire family. NOTE: Admission to the MCNY is free that weekend, but advanced registration is required. (See below to register.)

Prof. Kenneth T. Jackson, editor of the Encyclopedia of New York City, has called Green, "arguably the most important leader in Gotham's long history." During his fifty-year career, Green steered the creation of some of New York City's foremost parks, cultural institutions, and public works. He rescued the city from bankruptcy after the Tweed Ring scandals, and pioneered the historic preservation movement. Most importantly, he masterminded the 1898 consolidation of the five boroughs, a measure that expanded the city's size five-fold and earned him the nickname "the Father of Greater New York." 

Light refreshments will be served at the ceremony. 


Andrew H. Green Tribute Ceremony 
Sunday, November 20, 2016
12:00 noon
Free. No reservations required. Invite your friends!
Andrew H. Green Memorial Bench, inside Central Park at about 105 Street (map and directions below)
Questions/inquiries: mmiscione@manhattanbp.nyc.gov 

New York at Its Core Opening Celebration 
All weekend long: Saturday, November 19, 10:00a to Sunday, November 20, 6:00p 
Museum of the City of New York 
1220 Fifth Ave. at 103rd St.
Admission to the MCNY is free that weekend, but advanced registration is required. 
More about the exhibition: http://mcny.org/nyatitscore 
(Copy and paste the web address into your browser bar if links do not work.)



Prof. Kenneth T. Jackson spoke at a previous Andrew H. Green tribute ceremony. 
(Image at top of page: Andrew H. Green, c. 1870) 


DIRECTIONS TO THE ANDREW H. GREEN MEMORIAL BENCH

Note: Looking at the map, the bench appears approachable from all sides. It is not! Because of hills and drop-offs not shown, it can only be reached using the footpath mentioned below.

From the East Side: At Fifth Avenue and E. 102 Street, enter the park via the pedestrian entrance. Make your way onto the main auto drive. Walk north on the drive for about two blocks. When you come to the standing three-sided map on your left (the composting operation will be on your right), turn left on to the wide, well-paved crossover road that heads to the West Side. Take an immediate right onto the blacktop footpath that heads uphill. Bear right as you walk along the footpath. The bench is at the top of the hill.

From the West Side: At Central Park West and W. 100 Street, enter the park via the automobile entrance road. Bear left, merging on to the main drive. Continue walking north on the drive for about two blocks. Before the drive crosses a stone bridge, turn right onto the wide, well-paved crossover road that heads to the East Side. A yellow phone box will mark the intersection. Continue down this road. Just before the road intersects with the main east drive, turn left onto the blacktop footpath that heads uphill. Bear right as you walk along the footpath. The bench is at the top of the hill. 


Comments