Manchurian Mushroom

 
 
 
 
 


  • 1 Where did tea come from?
  • 2 Where did the name "tea" come from?
  • 3 What are the major tea types?
  • 4 What are some of the most popular teas?
  • 5 What are some of the most popular blends of tea?
  • 6 What are some of the most popular oolong teas?
  • 7 What are some of the most popular green teas?
  • 8 What are flavoured teas?
  • 9 What is Bergamot?
  • 10 What are some of the most popular flavoured teas?
  • 11 What types of teas are used most often to make Kombucha Tea?
  • 12 Can I use herbal teas to make Kombucha Tea?
  • 13 Can I use decaffeinated tea to make Kombucha Tea?
  • 14 Is the caffeine in Kombucha Tea all used up by the colony?
  • 15 Should I use teas with fruit oils added?
  • 16 Do tea polyphenols effect the growth of bifidobacterium?
  • 17 What water temperature is recommended for making green tea?
  • 18 Are there side effects from using Chinese or Japanese green tea?
  • 19 How seriously should I take the time limits for infusing tea?
  • 20 What is a tea infuser?
  • 21 What are some good methods to strain loose tea leaves?
  • 22 Does caffeine act as a stimulant?
  • 23 How long does caffeine remain in the body?
  • 24 Does caffeine consumption cause cancer?
  • 25 Does caffeine cause heart disease or stroke?
  • http://manchurianmushroom.blogspot.com/2011/01/kombucha-history.html ----------------------------------------------------
    • 26 Does caffeine consumption affect high blood pressure?
    • 27 Can pregnant women safely consume caffeine?
    • 28 Does caffeine consumption make children hyperactive?
    • 29 Does caffeine effect benign breast disease?
    • 30 Is there any link between caffeine and osteoporosis?
    • 31 Does discontinued use of caffeine cause withdrawal symptoms?
    • 32 What is the chemical composition of the tea leaf?
    • 33 How can one lower the caffeine content in tea?

     

Manchurian Mushroom

Top 10 Noticeable Benefits of Drinking Manchurian Tea Daily

Prevents Acid Reflux

Assists With Weight Loss

Aids in Digestion of Heavy Me
als

Strengthens Hair, Restores Hair

More Energy in the Morning

Helps With Sleep

Relives Constipation

Post Work Out Recovery Drink (Cardiovascular and Resistance Training)

Reduces Severity of Hangovers

Better Skin Complexion, Tighter Skin Tone

 

                                           TEA

1 Where did tea come from?

According to Encyclopaedia Britannica, China introduced tea to the world. The word tea comes from a Chinese ideogram pronounced "tay" in the Amoy dialect and came into English with that pronunciation, changing to its present form in the 18th Century.

Tea is made from the young leaves and leaf buds of the tea plant, "Camellia sinensis"--a species of evergreen. Ancient legends refer to a beverage made from an infusion of dried tea leaves which was thought to have been introduced by Emperor Shen Nung in about 2737 BC. Existing records credit the Chinese with originating tea cultivation, although it is possible that some tribes in Shan States in Berma, China, and Siam (Thailand) have used tea in some form as long as the Chinese. The China tea plant--brought to Japan in about AD 800--was regarded as a medicine for 500 years, until green tea was developed and became a popular Japanese beverage.

Tea is designated as black (fermented,) green (unfermented), or oolong (semi-fermented), depending upon the process applied. Oolong, is prepared in South China and Taiwan from a special form of China plant, chesima, that gives this tea unique flavour.

2 Where did the name "tea" come from?

The word for tea in most of mainland China and also in Japan is "cha." Hence its frequency in names of Japanese teas: Sencha, Hojicha, etc. But the word for tea in Fujian province is "te" (pronounced approximately "tay"). The first mass marketers of tea in the West were the Dutch, whose contacts were in Fujian. They adopted this name, and handed it on to most other European countries. The two exceptions are Russia and Portugal, who had independent trade links to China. The Portuguese call it "cha," the Russians "chai." Other areas (such as Turkey, South Asia and the Arab countries) have some version of "chai" or "shai." "Tay" was the pronunciation when the word first entered English, and it still is in Scotland and Ireland. For unknown reasons, at some time in the early eighteenth century the English changed their pronunciation to "tee." Virtually every other European language however, retains the original pronunciation of "tay."

3 What are the major tea types?

The three main classifications of tea are:

  • Black Tea: Apparently 99% of the tea drunk in the USA is black tea which has been fully oxidized or fermented, and yields a hearty flavoured amber brew.
  • Oolong Tea: Popular in China. is partly oxidized and is a cross between black and green tea in colour and in taste.
  • Green Tea: Skips the oxidizing step. It has a more delicate taste and is light golden-green in colour. Green tea, a staple of the Orient, is gaining popularity in the US due in part to recent scientific studies linking green tea drinking with reduced cancer risk.

4 What are some of the most popular teas?

  • Assam
  • Ceylon
  • Darjeeling
  • Keemun
  • Nilgiri
  • Sikkin
  • Yunnan

5 What are some of the most popular blends of tea?

  • English Breakfast
  • Earl Grey
  • Irish Breakfast
  • Russian Caravan

6 What are some of the most popular oolong teas?

  • Ti Kuan Yin
  • Formosa Oolong
  • Boa Jong
  • Pu-erh

7 What are some of the most popular green teas?

  • Genmaicha
  • Gyokuro
  • Hojicha
  • Longjing
  • Matticha
  • Pouchong
  • Silver Tip
  • Spider Leg
  • Gunpowder

8 What are flavoured teas?

While flavoured teas evolve from the three basic teas, (black, oolong and green), herbal teas contain no true tea leaves. Herbal and "medicinal" teas are created from the flowers, berries, peels, seeds, leaves and roots of many different plants.

9 What is Bergamot?

Bergamot is a small acidic orange with a peel that yields an essential oil--called "essence of bergamot" which is used for perfumes and confections. The peel is used in Earl Grey tea. It is also candied and used in the same way as other candied fruit peels.

10 What are some of the most popular flavoured teas?

  • Jasmine
  • Earl Grey
  • Lapsang Souchong

11 What types of teas are used most often to make Manchurian Mushroom Tea?

Regular black or green tea, or a combination of these two, are used the most often.

12 Can I use herbal teas to make Manchurian Mushroom ?

Some people use herbal tea to make Kombucha, others add the herbs to Kombucha after it has been fermented. Herbal teas contain alkaloids which may affect the Kombucha colony.

13 Can I use decaffeinated tea to make Manchurian Mushroom ?

Yes. Some people use only decaffeinated tea . Others use a combination of 3 or 4 bags decaffeinated tea with 1 or 2 bags regular black tea. Decaffeinated tea still has about 3% caffeine content.

14 Is the caffeine in Manchurian Mushroom  all used up by the colony?

No. The caffeine content of Kombucha Tea remains unchanged by the fermentation process.

15 Should I use teas with fruit oils added?

The fruit oils in flavoured tea like orange and lemon zinger, have been found to have a damaging affect on the Manchurian Mushroom .

16 Do tea polyphenols effect the growth of bifidobacterium?

Yes, see following report:

Mitsuoka T. Intestinal Flora and Aging. Nutrition Reviews (1992) 50:438-446.

"Mitsuoka is one of the few widely published researchers in this field (probiotics) and s associated with the Nippon Veterinary and Animal Science University in Kyonan-cho Japan. Without getting into the full article, he basically says that as one ages, the intestinal flora change their relative proportions. Bifidobacteria are diminished, whereas clostridia increases significantly (along with lactobacilli, streptococci, and entero-bacteria). The metabolism of bacteria appear to play a more important role in human health than previously thought, and as such, the shift of bacteria in health and disease may provide indications of prospective health.

What we eat or drink contributes considerably to the selective growth of various bacteria. This particular study reports that tea polyphenols (as in green tea) appear to moderately enhance the growth of the bifido-bacterium and selectively inhibit the various species of Clostridia.

To put this all in perspective, several of the "medicinal foods" like Kombucha that are reported anecdotally to affect conditions of the GI tract, skin, and allergic conditions, may have as common denominator the selective inhibition and promotion of those bacteria in the GI tract that affect immune function and detox metabolism. In any case, such information at least provides a rationale to further investigate the particular effect of Kombucha on health.

17 What water temperature is recommended for making green tea?

Chinese or Japanese traditional tea-making requires water temperature of about 90° C.

18 Are there side effects from using Chinese or Japanese green tea?

One should start with a small amount, as each individual may have different sensitivity to green tea. Some people may find it makes it hard to sleep if drunk at night. Some have experienced no side-effects at all.

19 How seriously should I take the time limits for infusing tea?

If you've ever tasted over-steeped tea, you know that it is bitter and astringent.
Three to five minutes is fine for most varieties. Oolong, which is always large leaves, requires a long steeping time: usually between five and six minutes. Darjeeling, interestingly enough, is often best with a steeping time between 90 seconds and three minutes. (Since it tends toward astringency, the short steeping time helps keep the balance of flavours right. This is especially true of first flush Darjeeling.)

While the above steeping times are used by some, others prefer to steep tea for 10-15 minutes, some longer, feeling the longer steep time to be more beneficial to the end results--by adding more nutrients from the tea to the culture. Remember, however, the longer you steep your tea --the higher the caffeine and tannin contents will be in your Kombucha Tea.

20 What is a tea infuser?

A tea infuser is a small perforated basket-like container with a hinged opening. Loose tea is placed inside the infuser, which is then closed and lowered into the teapot filled with boiling water. The tiny holes in the infuser allow the water to interact with the tea leaves. A tiny chain with a hook at one end is attached to the top of the infuser. The hook slips over the rim of the teapot so the infuser can easily be removed. Tea infusers are usually made of stainless or chromed steel, although there are also porcelain and silver models.

21 What are some good methods to strain loose tea leaves?

  • Leaves loose in the pot: The leaves have maximum freedom to uncurl and circulate in the water, which makes for stronger and more flavourful tea. You can then strain the tea leaves out of the water by pouring through a strainer.
  • Tea ball: Most tea balls are made of aluminum with small holes for water circulation. These are very easy to remove and clean. One disadvantage to this method is that there is very little room for the leaves to expand and the water cannot circulate freely around the leaves.
  • Stainless-steel mesh infuser: This is made of stainless steel and gives better circulation than an aluminum ball, however, the leaves are still more restricted than they would be loose. It's easy to remove and clean. Mesh infusers also come in plastic and gold of various sizes.
  • Basket filter: This is a metal, plastic, or ceramic basket to hold the leaves. The leaves can circulate almost as freely as if they were loose.
  • Tea sock: A fabric enclosure for the leaves. The disadvantages to using this type of strainer is they are hard to clean and may retain odors from previous batches.
  • Paper filter: This is like a coffee filter and fits into a plastic holder. They are easy to remove and discard.

22 Does caffeine act as a stimulant?

[The following answer is from the IFIC, International Food Information Council Foundation. 1100 Connecticut Avenue, N. W. Suite 430. Washington, DC. 20036 (reference in bibliography- Part 8)]

Caffeine is a pharmacologically active substance, and, depending on the dose, can be a mild central nervous system stimulant. [2] However, any pharmacological effects of caffeine are transient, usually passing within hours. [5] Scientific studies have shown that individuals who consume caffeine may increase memory and improve reasoning powers. Research indicated that those who consumed caffeine scored higher grades on motor skill tests, enhanced reaction times and improved auditory and visual vigilance.[6,7]

23 How long does caffeine remain in the body?

[The following answer is from the IFIC, International Food Information Council Foundation. 1100 Connecticut Avenue, N. W. Suite 430. Washington, DC. 20036 (reference in bibliography- Part 8)]

Caffeine does not accumulate in the body over the course of time and is normally excreted within several hours of consumption. The "half-life" of caffeine is the time it takes to eliminate one-half of consumed caffeine from the body. This varies among individuals, about three to four hours in healthy adults. Smoking increases the metabolism of caffeine, generally reducing the half-life to no more than three hours. Children also metabolize caffeine at a quicker rate.[2]

24 Does caffeine consumption cause cancer?

[The following answer is from the IFIC, International Food Information Council Foundation. 1100 Connecticut Avenue, N. W. Suite 430. Washington, DC. 20036 (reference in bibliography- Part 8)]

The American Cancer Society's Guidelines on Diet, Nutrition and Cancer state there is no indication that caffeine is a risk factor in human cancer and the National Academy of Sciences' National Research Council reports there is no convincing evidence relating caffeine to any type of cancer. [17, 18]

25 Does caffeine cause heart disease or stroke?

[The following answer is from the IFIC, International Food Information Council Foundation. 1100 Connecticut Avenue, N. W. Suite 430. Washington, DC. 20036 (reference in bibliography- Part 8)]

Findings from a Framingham Heart Study were substantiated in 1990 when a prospective study concluded by Harvard University researchers further concluded that caffeine consumption causes "no substantial increase in the risk of coronary heart disease or stroke." The study included 45,589 men between the ages of 40 to 75 years old and adjusted for major cardiovascular-risk indicators including dietary intake of fats and cholesterol and smoking.[21]

26 Does caffeine consumption affect high blood pressure?

[The following answer is from the IFIC, International Food Information Council Foundation. 1100 Connecticut Avenue, N. W. Suite 430. Washington, DC. 20036 (reference in bibliography- Part 8)]

Dr. Martin Myers, of the cardiology division at the Sunnybrook Center in Toronto, reviewed the scientific literature of caffeine and blood pressure in 1988. In his review, Myers examined 17 scientific studies that investigated the effects of caffeine on blood pressure after long-term administration. Upon final examination, Myers concluded that "caffeine does not cause any persistent increase in blood pressure." [24]

27 Can pregnant women safely consume caffeine?

[The following answer is from the IFIC, International Food Information Council Foundation. 1100 Connecticut Avenue, N. W. Suite 430. Washington, DC. 20036 (reference in bibliography- Part 8)]

Dr. Alan Leviton of Boston's Children's Hospital reviewed the results of 13 human studies conducted since 1981 on the effect of caffeine consumption on reproduction. Published in 1988, Leviton concluded that "no evidence has yet been offered that caffeine consumption at moderate levels by pregnant women has any discernible adverse effect on their fetuses." [32]

The FDA after evaluating scientific evidence, has concluded that caffeine does not adversely affect reproduction in humans. However, the agency continues to advise pregnant women to consume caffeine in moderation. [3]

28 Does caffeine consumption make children hyperactive?

[The following answer is from the IFIC, International Food Information Council Foundation. 1100 Connecticut Avenue, N. W. Suite 430. Washington, DC. 20036 (reference in bibliography- Part 8)]

Contrary to popular belief, children, including those diagnosed as hyperactive, are no more sensitive to the effects of caffeine than adults. [5,8] Plus, a 1984 study demonstrated that caffeine was not a cause of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). [9]

29 Does caffeine effect benign breast disease?

[The following answer is from the IFIC, International Food Information Council Foundation. 1100 Connecticut Avenue, N. W. Suite 430. Washington, DC. 20036 (reference in bibliography- Part 8)]

A large case-control study conducted by the National Cancer Institute (NCI) in 1986, involving more than 3,000 women, showed no evidence of an association between caffeine intake and benign tumor, fibrocystic breast disease or breast tenderness. [35] Both the NCI and the AMA Council on Scientific Affairs have stated there is no association between caffeine intake and fibrocystic breast disease. [37,26] The original findings suggesting such a relationship have never been corroborated.

30 Is there any link between caffeine and osteoporosis?

[The following answer is from the IFIC, International Food Information Council Foundation. 1100 Connecticut Avenue, N. W. Suite 430. Washington, DC. 20036 (reference in bibliography- Part 8)]

Because caffeine has been linked to calcium excretion, it has been suggested as a risk factor for osteoporosis. However, Scientists from the Mayo Clinic conducted a clinical study of 290 women to examine the influence of caffeine intake on bone mineral content. After adjusting for age, calcium intake, cigarette smoking, and alcohol consumption the researchers concluded that caffeine was not an important risk factor for osteoporosis.[40]

31 Does discontinued use of caffeine cause withdrawal symptoms?

[The following answer is from the IFIC, International Food Information Council Foundation. 1100 Connecticut Avenue, N. W. Suite 430. Washington, DC. 20036 (reference in bibliography- Part 8)]

Depending on the amount ingested, caffeine can be a mild stimulant to the central nervous system. When regular caffeine consumption is abruptly discontinued, some individuals may experience withdrawal symptoms, such as headaches, fatigue or drowsiness. These effects usually are temporary, lasting for a few days, and can often be avoided if caffeine cessation is gradual.[10,43, 44]

32 What is the chemical composition of the tea leaf?

The following information is from Chemistry of the Tea Leaf--The Way of Tea by Max Tillberg

INORGANIC CONSTITUENTS: 
 

 

Aluminum

0.069%

Calcium

0.46%

Copper

0.002%

Iron

1.15%

Mangnesium

0.22%

Manganese

0.12%

Phosphorus

0.32%

Potassium

0.76%

Silicone

0.024%

Sodium

0.030%

Sulfur

0.088%

Zinc

0.003%

THE NITROGENS:

Total nitrogen 4.5%

Soluble protein and amino-acid nitrogen 0.92%

Insoluble nitrogen 2.51%

Caffeine nitrogen 1.07% (Caffeine percentage 3.71%)

CARBOHYDRATE AND ASSOCIATED COMPOUNDS:

Sugars and starch are consistently found in tea leaf but only in small quantities. Lipids occur in the general protoplasm and Pectin's are present in quite large amounts in tea.

Sugars 0.73-1.41%

Pectins 6.1%

Starch 0.82-2.96%

THE POLYPHENOLS:

The most important and characteristic components of tea leaf are polyphenols. The polyphenols, like alcohols, are a very large class and properties and derivatives differ widely. Those occurring in tea are derivatives of acid and catechin. There are four main compounds with chemical configurations based on catechin and gallic acid. These are:

  • Catechin
  • Gallocatechin
  • Epicatechin
  • Epigallo Catechin

PIGMENTS:

The leaves contain:

  • Chlorophyll
  • Red and yellow pigments derived from anthocyanins and flavones.

ENZYMES:

The oxidation of tea polyphenols on exposure to air is exceedingly slow unless brought about by the activity of the appropriate enzyme. The major reaction is accomplished by a specific oxidase, a protein of which the prosthetic element is copper.

VITAMINS:

  • Riboflavin (Vitamin B2) is present in the tea leaf and persists during manufacture and storage.
  • Ascorbic acid (Vitamin C) is also a constituent of tea leaf, but is oxidized during the fermentation process in the manufacture of black tea.

33 How can one lower the caffeine content in tea?

According to Mack Flemming of the "American Classic Tea Company" of Charleston Tea Plantation on Wadmalaw Island in South Carolina; "to lower the caffeine in tea, brew it overnight in cold water, this will cut the caffeine by 50%. Place 7 tea bags into a one gallon container filled with cold water, let sit overnight then squeeze the tea bags out and discard them."

Compostion of The Manchurian Mushroom
Various Enzymes

Acetic acid - detoxifier

Carbonic acid - presents in blood aids in CO2 release and regulation of blood pH levels.

Folic Acid - a B vitamin, works with vitamin B12 in reducing homocysteine, a risk factor for heart disease. Supplementation may prevent, correct deficiencies caused by, or be helpful with, Aging, Cancer, Crohn's disease, Heart disease (atherosclerosis & hypercholesterolemia), Immunodepression (including AIDS & CFIDS), Memory loss

(including Alzheimer's disease), Osteoporosis, Periodontal disease.

Gluconic acid - acts as a food preservative and is a product of the breakdown of

glucose.

Glucuronic acid - Vital to detoxification of the body also produced by the healthy human liver. A precursor for mucopolysaccharide which helps in the prevention of the aging of skin tissue. There is a scientific dispute as to wheter or not Kombucha contains this acid or its precusors. Trying to understand this debate and who is right

or wrong will give you a headache.

L(+) Lactic acid - detoxifier, assist blood circulation, helps prevent bowel decay and constipation. Aids in balancing acids and alkaline in the body and believed to help in the prevention of cancer by helping to regulate blood pH levels.

Usnic acid - inhibits viruses an anti-bacterial agent.

Amino acids (various) - anti-aging properties, aids in the body's production of Growth Hormone (GH). Hydroxy acids (various)


Vitamin B1 (Thiamin) - believed to aid in the prevention of arthritic conditions, atherosclerosis, cancer, free radical damage, skin aging, stroke, brain cell aging, and a immune system stimulant

Vitamin B2 (Riboflavin) - believed to aid in the prevention of allergies, arthritic

conditions.

Vitamin B3 (Niacin, niacinamide) - believed to aid in prevention of arthritic conditions, hair loss and free radical damage. Aids in healing of skin tissue. Promotes sexual excitation and stamina, also used as a tranquilizer substitute in high doses.

Vitamin B6 (Pyridoxine) - believed to aid in the prevention of atherosclerosis, free radical damage, obesity, rheumatism, stroke, and promotes "sex flush" and orgasm.

Vitamin B12 (Cobalamin, cyanocobalamin) - believed to aid in memory and learning

functions.

Vitamin C (from Lactic acid) - numerous known health benefits, too many

 to list

 

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