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30 Generations of Madoc

Madoc Generations of Wales, Maddox GenealogyJames G. Perry researches the Maddox line more than thirty generations back from the mid-1600s, taking it back more than a thousand years into Welsh History.  From his book, Kinfolk, he continues:

Jones' History of Breckonchshire contains many interesting accounts of this family.  The lineage of the family is reported as follows:

'Cradoc Vraich Vras, or Cradoc of the Strong Arm, Lord of Gloucester and Hereford; Knight of the Dolorand Tower (Dolorous Castle) and of the Round Table of King Arthur, son of Molwynen by Gwen or Gwenllian, married Legan Eurfron, daughter of King Pelynor.

 He was the grandson of Brychan. He was succeeded on the throne by the eldest son Cawrdaf, King of Ferreg and Brecon, who married and was succeeded by his eldest son, Caw ap Cawrdaf, King of Ferreg and Brecon, who married and was succeeded by his eldest son,  Gloyw, King of Ferreg and Brecon, who married and  was succeeded by his eldest son, Howy,  King of Ferreg and Brecon, who married and was succeeded by his eldest son, Cynvarch ap Howy, who reigned about 680 A.D.; married and was succeeded by his eldest son.

 Cyndeg ap Cynvarch, who reigned about 703 A.D., married and was succeeded by his eldest son Teithwalch ap Cyndeg,  King of Ferreg and Brecon, who married and was succeeded by his eldest son, Tegyd ap Twithwalch, who reigned about 796 A.D.; who married and was succeeded by his eldest son Anharawd ap Tegyd, who reigned about 819 A.D.; married and was succeeded by his eldest son, Gwendy ap Anharawd, King of Ferreg and Brecon, who married and was succeeded by his eldest son Huganus, who reigned about 900 A.D.  He was defeated by Elfeda. 

This was the beginning of the decline in power.  He married and was succeeded by his eldest son Dryffin, King of Ferreg and Brecon, who married Crusilla, daughter of Idwal ap Meuric. 

His second son was Drymbenog, Lord of Canter Self, who married Gwenlliam, daughter of Justin ap Gwregvran, and had Moreiddig Warwyn, who married Elinor, daughter of Lord Rhys, Prince of South Wales and had Llewelyn who married Joan, daughter of Cynhylin ap Rhys Goch, and had Gwrgan, who married a daughter of Sir Miles Pitcher, and had Howell ap Gwrgan who married Cissil, daughter of Sir Humphrey Burchill, and had Tahaern Dal, second son, who married Joan, daughter of Philip Walbeoffe, Lord Llanhamlach, and had Tralaern Fychan, who married Anne, daughter of Sir Watkin Scull, and had Madog. who married Elinor, daughter of Richard Bois, and had Trahaern, who married Lysod, daughter of David Pwell Yeham ap Howel ap Elinon Sols and had Madog, who married Joan, daughter of John Awbrey, and had Howel daughter of Owen Griffith ap Ewan Gethin, and had John Powel Madog of Maermawr, who married Mallt, daughter of Sir Howell y Fwyall, and had Thomas Maddocks, Lord of Llanfynach, who married  a daughter of Jenkin Morgan and had (1) John Madog, Lord of Llanfynach and (2) Thomas Madog, Lord of Seethrog, who married Giladis Watkins and died in 1620. leaving a son, John Madog.

Lord of Seethrog, who married and died in 1630, leaving a son John Madog, Lord of Seethrog, who married and had a son, Samuel Madocx or Maddox, who emigrated to St. Mary's County, Maryland, shortly after the fall of Charles the first."  Genealogical Magazine, Vol (1907) H.R. 929, page 44.
I regret that does not read easily.  But notice that Nicholas' earlier statement spoke of various persons in the family, but obviously skipped generations of successions.  Jones recites that order.  Since it is the Madog family, the name Madog apparently can be added behind each of those names, for they are recognized by the given name, rather than the family name.  By remembering that "ap" means "son of", an order of descent can be made from the Jones material, and in that order of descent, some of the statements of Nicholas adds information:

1. Brychan, had
2. Molwyn, who married Gwen or Gwenllian, and had
3. Cradoc, Lord of Glocester and Hereford, Knight of the Round Table (Dolorous Castle), probably him who married Maude Maddox Jones called Caradoc, married Eurfon, daughter of King Pelynor, and had
4. Cawrdaf, who had
5. Cap, who had
6. Gloyw, who had
7. Howy, who had
8. Cynvarch about 680 A.D., and had
9. Cyndeg, about 703 A.D., and had
10. Teithwalch, who had
11.  Tegyd, about 796 A.D., and had
12.  Anharawd about 819 A.D., (this appears to conflict with Maude Maddox Jones statement that Angharad was daughter of Owain ab Gwynedd, and her son, Madoc ab Gruffedd ruled over Powys in 1197, died in 1236 and is buried in Vale Crucis Abbey.  The spelling is little different.  If there is a grave or tomb at Vale Crucis Abbey, it is outside the immediate premise or else not preserved, for I walked the grounds and searched.  My suspicion is that she refers to the wife of Howel, hereafter) and had
13,  Gwendy, and had
14. Huganus, about 900 A.D., defeated by Elfleda. and had
15.    Dryffin who married Crucilla, daughter of Idwal, and owned Ruthin Castle which was strengthened by Grey, 1296.  He had
16. Drymbenog, Lord of Cantreff Selyff, married a daughter of Justin and had
17. Moreddig Warwyn, described earlier, who married Elinor, daughter of Lord Rhys. and had
18.  Llewelyn, who married Joan.
(Note: If Huganus ruled about 900 A.D., this being the fifth ruler thereafter, a time frame somewhere close to 1200 -1300 could be assumed for this ruler, and this is noted because of the times of rule of Llewelyn mentioned in other references.  We are told that Cynhylin, son of Rhys Goch, was the father of Joan. 

The brother of Owen Glendower was named Rhys.  Elinor, wife of Moreddig Warwyn, was a daughter of Lord Rhys.  Also.  Costain describes Glendower later, and also mentions the red bard, Iolo Goch, in his home.  Those things make me think that Lord Rhys and Goch were in the family of Glendower. 

Also, Maude Maddox Jones would seem to put Glendower directly into the family line by her references to 'Madoc, son of Owain ab Gwynned' and 'Madoc ab Gruffedd'.  The tourist book quoted later refers to Llewelyn the Last as Llewelyn Gruffedd.  Madoc and Glendower are in the same line.  But Glendower traced from rulers on both sides of his house and one easily could confuse the two lines. 

The name Glendower is associated with names spelled nearly the same, such as Gwynned or Gruffedd.  One researcher traced Glendower to Anharawd, and perhaps he touches the line in more than one spot for Moreddig Warwyn appears to have possibly married into the line which produced Glendower also - but that is my conclusion. and not that of an authority. 

Jones mentions also the rule of Powys by the Madogs, and that area was elsewhere said to have been ruled by Glendower's line.  We will also read of Llewelyn the Great and Llewelyn the Last.  The history which we now dissect mentions only one Llewelyn.

 Thus I must conclude that Jones either missed a generation, accounting for the other Llewelyn, or else the two Llewelyns who are more noted by history must be in a different line.  I suspect the first since Nicholas missed generations, so Jones could have done so, but that reasoning may be error. 

Remember, the history of Wales includes partible succession, and that appears to mean that even the rulers we outline here may not be exclusive, for the rule could have been shared with some other person in the family.
Llewelyn and Joan had
19. Gwrgan married the daughter of Sir Miles Pitcher, and had
20. Howel, married Cissil, daughter of Sir Humphrey Buchill.
(Note the Nicholas report that "The son of Gwgan Howel displayed the boldness of his house by marrying a daughter of the Norman Buchill...'). They had
21.    Traharne Dal (the tall) who married Joan, daughter of Philip Walbeoffe, Lord Llanhamlach, and had
22. Trahaern Fychan, who married Ann, daughter of Sir Watkins Scull, and had
23.  Madog (ap Traharne, according to Nicholas), who married Elinor, daughter of Richard Bois, and had
24. Traharne, married Lysod. daughter of David Pwell Yeham and had
25. Madog (ap Traharne), married Joan, daughter of John Aubrey. and had
26.  Howel.
(Note: the Jones report literally says 'had Howel daughter of Owen Griffith...and had John Powell Madog."  One does not have another person's daughter.  Nicholas notes that Thomas Maddocks is the great grandson of Howel.  Perhaps Howel married the daughter of Owen Griffith. From other references to the name Griffith, I take that to be Owen Glendower.  Now we may look back and see that Maude Maddox Jones told us her name was Angharad.  Obviously, all the writers suffer the same problem.  With thirty generations of Madogs, and limited record keeping, fitting the legends to particular individuals is difficult.) They had
27. John Powell Madog, who married Mallt. daughter of Sir Howel y Fwyall, and had
28. Thomas Maddocks, lord of Llanfynach, who married the daughter of Jenkins Morgan, and they had
29. John Madog, Lord of Llanfynach, who had
30. Thomas Madog, Lord of Seethrog, who married Giladis Watkins who died in 1620.  They had
31. John Madog,  Lord of Seethrog, who had Samuel Maddocx or Maddocks, who immigrated to Maryland
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