Rep. John Shadrack Maddox

John Shadrack Maddox Genealogy

Line of Fredonia Maddox Webster - an important Maddox genealogist

John Shadrack Maddox (1835-1915), third issue of Notley C. and Permilia Ann Maddox, was born August 27, 1835, in Putnam County, Georgia.  He was a tot of two years when his parents left Putnam County and settled in Harris County on January 7, 1837.  His grandfather Shadrack Rowe, and his family had preceded them to Harris County and the new home was about three miles distant and near the village of Whitesville.

Whitesville, GA was a thriving center with nice homes, stores, and two beautiful churches.  (The Methodist was first church built in Harris County.)  There was a boarding school of wide reputation where young people of that section and Maddoxes received their education.  The State Stage Coach Road was the main highway to Columbus, Georgia, through Whitesville.

The people were large land and slave owners and the social register of Whitesville vied with LaGrange and Hamilton, Georgia.  Some of the families beside Maddox were:  Booker, Mobley, Cotton, Godwin, Hunt, Traylor, Rowe, Thornton and others, and the beloved Dr. E. Norwood.

Miss Ross Norwood was a sweetheart of young John S. Maddox.  She was a student of LaGrange Female College, LaGrange, Georgia, in the year 1859.  That same year Nancy Ann Johnson and her sister, Rebecca, daughters of Dr. William G. Johnson of Warren County were students there.  Nancy Ann Johnson visited Whitesville as guest of Miss Ross Norwood and at a party given in the Thornton home was introduced to John S. Maddox from the balcony above as he stood in the walk below.  (This home is still standing.)

Nancy Ann Johnson was the daughter of Dr. William Goza Johnson and Elizabeth (Mitchell) Johnson of Warren County, Georgia.  She was born June 22, 1841; was graduated from LaGrange Female College in the spring of 1860 .  She was there when the college burned.

She possessed the features of her grandmother, Fanny Gosz Johnson, who was French.  Nancy was small in stature, with gray eyes, brunette complexion, fine delicate features, with very back curly hair that never grayed.

John Shadrack Maddox and Nancy Ann Johnson were married November 13, 1860.  They built a home two miles north of Whitesville on the old Stage Coach Road near Union Church.

In April, 1862, John S. Maddox enlisted in Company D, 3rd Georgia Calvary,  under Joe Wheeler and served throughout the war as sergeant.  During his absence, Nancy taught school in Warrenton, Georgia. John S. Maddox surrendered with Johnson at Raleigh, North Carolina.  After the surrender, they lived a year with his family in Harris County, Georgia.  In 1866, they moved to St. Clair County, Alabama, near Easonville.  He bought 500 acres of very fertile land on the north bank of the Coosa River and lived there until his death, October 3, 1915.

Children of John S. Maddox and wife, Nancy Ann (Johnson) Maddox:
The two first, a boy and a girl, died in Warren County during the war.

1.  Fountain Alexander Maddox, was born March 6, 1866, Harris County, Georgia.
2.  Frances Rebecca Maddox, was born February 29, 1868, Harris County, Georgia.
3.  William Notley Maddox, was born March 19, 1870, St. Clair County, Easonville, Alabama.
4.  Emily Smith Maddox, was born August 12, 1871, St. Clair County, Easonville, Alabama.
5.  John Daniel Maddox, was born March 17, 1873, St. Clair County, Easonville, Alabama.
6.  Fredonia Raiford Maddox (author of an important book, THE MADDOX FAMILY OF MARYLAND), was born December 6, 1874, St. Clair County, Easonville, Alabama. (see bottom)
7.  Rosser Angalet Maddox was born March 18, 1877, St. Clair County, Easonville, Alabama.
8.  David Jerremiah Maddox, was born September 11, 1878, St. Clair County, Easonville, Alabama.
9.  Henry Johnson Maddox was born May 30, 1880, St. Clair County, Easonville, Alabama.
Their influence was a decided factor for good in the church and community life.  Mr. Maddox was elected twice as representative from St. Clair County to the Alabama Legislature, without a soliciting a vote, in 1880 and 1888.  While there, he was author of a bill to prohibit the sale of whiskey within three miles of a church.  He never allowed his family to go to a circus because the women wore tights.

Their home was a gathering place for the young people.  The third Sunday in March was always "birthday Sunday" as five children's birthdays came near that date.  Mr. Maddox was well informed and a great reader.  At night when the day's work was finished (farmers), the family gathered around the fireside in winter and on the front porch in summer.  Discussions and conversations were indulged in between parents and children.  Mrs. Maddox always boarded the community school teachers.  One I. W. Hill lived in this home for 8 or 10 years, and his influence and fraternal advice had much to do with shaping the character of the children of this family.

Mr. and Mrs. Maddox celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary in the summer of 1910, with all of their children present, at St. Clair County, Easonville, Alabama.  John S. Maddox was born in Putnam County, Georgia, August 27, 1835; was reared in Harris County, Georgia; and died at St. Clair County, Easonville, Alabama, October 3, 1915, at the age of 80 years.  Nancy Ann (Johnson) Maddox was born in Warren County, Georgia, June 22, 1841; died August 8, 1915, at the age of 74. Both are buried in the Methodist churchyard, St. Clair County, Easonville, Alabama.
-- by Dot Maddox. GA.

(*) Webmaster's note:  For those who have read this far, Fredonia Maddox (Webster) is an important figure in those searching the line of Samuel Maddox of Maryland, progenitor of a large and well documented line of early Maddoxes.  More than any other, this 20th century woman conducted lifelong research of the Samuel line--well before most others.

Singly because of her, the Samuel line is so well documented.  In part, it appears she wrote to establish her DAR accreditation and otherwise to report her own line.  But she reported more as well.  Her book, long since out of print and usually photocopied from genealogist to genealogist, is very fully reported on this website.   She is often quoted in genealogy books and articles on Maddox--sometimes with and without credit--because her research was so complete and so early.  It's fair to say her book is not easily readable; it is unimaginable what she could have done had she been able to use today's communication tools.  But she did it the old fashioned way with old fashioned, hard, dogged research.  There are a few mistakes in it, noted particularly by Wm Hurley who followed up on her research for his client, a later Maddox..  But her work was exhaustive and she provided leads to many Maddox genealogists to later continue her work.