Single: Moon Sayonara wo Oshiete
2018.02.21 Lingua Sounda/Victor
Album: No. 0
2018.03.24 Lingua Sounda/Victor


Salome
Lyrics: Sakurai Atsushi
Music: Hoshino Hidehiko

Dripping crimson red
I dance
Seven veils fluttering1
I shall make you drunk
I shall drive you mad
Ah let me kiss you2

Say, femme fatale
Say, it tastes of blood
This red wine wet in the flames
Say, femme fatale
Yes, your sapphire eyes
Scent of musk to stop my breath
Rose of Babylon

Your lips, hot like Hell

Dripping crimson red
I dance
Seven veils fluttering
I shall make you drunk
I shall drive you mad
Ah let me kiss you

Say, femme fatale
See, my lips are tainted with your blood
Say, femme fatale
Ah, the curtain falls
Thousand and One Nights dyed red3

Your lips, hotter than Hell

Dripping crimson red
I dance
Seven veils fluttering
I shall make you drunk
I shall drive you mad
Ah let me kiss you


Note: Salome was a Biblical figure, the daughter of a noblewoman, Herodias. Herodias flouted the laws of the time to divorce her first husband and marry Herod II, son of Herod the Great. Salome was not the daughter of Herod II, but the daughter of Herodias' first husband, so Herod II was not her father - which is perhaps why the Bible story about her became so sexualized (though familial bonds never seemed to stop sexuality in the Bible, as we can see in the case of Lot's daughters which I discussed in the article on Babel).

Anyhow, divorce violated the laws of the time, so John the Baptist, a popular religious leader, condemned Herodias as a sinner, much to her ire. Herod II had John locked up for insulting his wife, but he hesitated to have John killed because John was very well loved among the people. Herodias, however, wanted John dead. She saw her chance when Herod had a birthday feast and invited many illustrious guests. She ordered her daughter Salome to dance before the king and his guests, and Salome's dance so pleased Herod that he offered to grant her anything she wished for. Salome, being young, asked her mother Herodias for advice on what to ask for, so of course, Herodias said "ask for John the Baptist's head on a platter." Herod deeply regretted his promise to Salome, but couldn't betray his word, so reluctantly, he had John beheaded and the head brought to Salome. 

The thing is, Salome is never actually named in this Bible story, except as "the daughter of Herodias." Later scholars connected her with the name Salome based on non-Biblical genealogies of the noble families of the period. The different gospels give different accounts of John the Baptist's execution, but they all pretty much agree that Salome was a pawn in the game. And yet somehow, over the centuries, the interpretation of the story of Salome became twisted into quite a different tale - one in which Salome was the archetypal femme fatale, bewitching men with her eroticism and leading them to their doom. Salome was the subject of art works by notable artists such as Gustave Moreau and Aubrey Beardsley. Most famously, she was the inspiration for Oscar Wilde's 1893 play "Salome," which was deemed so racy by British authorities that, in order to get it performed in England, Wilde had to write the script in French, then have it translated into English and re-imported. In Wilde's play, Herod is infatuated with Salome, while Salome is infatuated with John the Baptist. John spurns Salome, so she demands his head as revenge for his rejection of her. 

The Marlene Dietrich dance scene in the goth BDSM Nazisploitation film The Night Porter also pays homage to Salome (no spoilers, go watch the film) - which wouldn't be relevant except for the fact that Sakurai's performance of "Yasou" on the Yumemiru Uchuu tour is almost certainly a reference to the same scene, and it's possible that this film is where he first encountered the Salome story. Imai also makes reference to a night porter in "Hikari no Teikoku," which is also almost certainly a reference to the same film.

1) In Wilde's play, Salome's dance is described as "The Dance of the Seven Veils," with a heavy implication of some sort of striptease. Belly-dance inspired "veil dances" were popular in Europe in the late 1800's, and this is probably where Wilde got his inspiration. Richard Strauss took Wilde's play and turned it into an opera in which the Dance of the Seven Veils took up seven minutes of stage action, and while Strauss claimed that he intended the dance to be thoroughly G-rated, most directors couldn't pass up the chance to eroticize it, and so the Dance of the Seven Veils has equaled "sexylicious Orientalist stripper dance" in the public consciousness ever since - but it's important to note that no mention of the Dance of the Seven Veils ever appeared in the Bible.

2) The first three lines of this stanza are written from Salome's perspective, while the second three are written from a man's perspective. The verses are all written from a man's perspective.

3) The Thousand and One Nights is another name for the Tales From the Arabian Nights. Though the Biblical Salome was not an Arab, the mention of the Arabian Nights fits with the Orientalist associations that were pasted on the Dance of the Seven Veils after the fact. Ancient Sumer and Babylonia were also located in what is now Iraq, and some scholars have linked the "seven veils" idea to the ancient Sumerian tale of the Descent of Inanna. Inanna was the goddess of love, sex, beauty, fertility, war, and power, and she was also worshiped by the ancient Babylonians as Ishtar. Before embarking on her descent into the Underworld, Ishtar clothes herself in seven magical items which represent aspects of her power, only to have each taken away in turn as she passes through the seven gates to the land of the dead. Ishtar was also portrayed as powerfully sexual, violent, lustful and capricious, and as such may have had a far greater influence on modern renderings of Salome than Biblical Salome ever did.




NOTE: The Spanish translation is a re-translation of the English translation by Cayce.  Cayce has only a marginal familiarity with Spanish, so the quality of this translation is unvetted, but Spanish-speaking fans, enjoy.

Salomé
Letra: Sakurai Atsushi
Música: Hoshino Hidehiko
Traducción: Natalia H.

Goteando un rojo carmesí
Yo bailo
Con los siete velos revoloteando (1)
He de emborracharte
He de enloquecerte
Déjame besarte (2)

Dime, femme fatale
Dime, si esto sabe a sangre
Este vino tinto mojado en las llamas
Dime, femme fatale
Si, tus ojos zafiro
Y el olor a almizcle para detener mi respiración
Rosa de Babilonia

Tus labios, tan calientes como el Infierno

Goteando un rojo carmesí
Yo bailo
Con los siete velos revoloteando
He de emborracharte
He de enloquecerte
Déjame besarte

Dime, femme fatale
Dime, mis labios están teñidos con tu sangre
Dime, femme fatale
El telón se cierra
Las Mil y una Noches teñidas de rojo (3)

Tus labios, tan calientes como el Infierno

Goteando un rojo carmesí
Yo bailo
Con los siete velos revoloteando
He de emborracharte
He de enloquecerte
Déjame besarte


Nota: Salomé es una figura bíblica, era la hija de una noble, Herodias. 
Heridas incumplió las leyes de su época al divorciarse de su primer esposo para luego casarse con Herod II, hijo de Herod el Grande. Salomé no era la hija de Herod II, sino que la hija del primer esposo de Herodias, así que Herod II no era su padre - quizás esta fue la razón por la que su historia en la Biblia se volvió tan sexualizada (a pesar de que los lazos familiares nunca detuvieron la sexualidad en la Biblia, como podemos ver claramente en el caso de las hijas de Lot en el artículo sobre Babel)

De cualquier forma, el divorcio violaba las leyes de la época, así que Juan Bautista, un popular líder religioso condenó a Herodias como una pecadora, lo que la llenó de ira. Herod II encerró a Juan por haber insultado a su esposa, pero dudó en matarlo porque Juan era bastante popular entre la gente. Sin embargo, Herodias quería a Juan muerto. Ella vió su oportunidad cuando Herod llevó a cabo un festín e invitó a muchos personajes ilustres. Le ordenó a su hija Salome que baile para el rey y sus invitados; el baile de Salomé satisfago tanto a Harold que él le ofreció cumplirle lo que sea que ella desease. Salomé, siendo joven, le pidió consejo a su madre Herodias, y obviamente ella dijo “pide la cabeza de Juan en una bandeja”. Herold rápidamente se arrepintió de haberle hecho aquella promesa a Salomé, pero no podía faltar a su palabra, así que mandó a decapitar a Juan y a que le lleven su cabeza a Salomé.

La cosa es que, a Salomé nunca se le menciona en esta historia bíblica, a excepción de “la hija de Herodias”. Algunos historiadores la conectaron con el nombre Salomé basados en árboles genealógicos no bíblicos de las familias nobles de la época. Los distintos evangelios dan distintas versiones de la ejecución de Juan Bautista, pero casi todos concuerdan en que Salomé fue un peón en todo ese juego. Pero sin embargo, a través de los siglos, la interpretación de la historia de Salomé se transformó en un cuento bastante distinto - uno en el que Salomé era la arquetípica femme fatale, encantaba hombres con su erotismo y los guiaba a su perdición. Salomé fue sujeto de varias obras de arte de notables artistas, tales como Gustave Moreau y Aubrey Beardsley. Y de las más notorias, ella fue la inspiración para la obra de 1893 de Oscar Wilde, “Salome”, que fue negada tan rápidamente por las autoridades Británicas que, para poder llegar a presentarla en Inglaterra, Wilde tuvo que escribir el texto en Francés, luego traducirlo al Inglés e importarlo de vuelta a su país. En la obra de Wilde, Herod es encantado por Salomé, mientras que ella está enamorada de Juan Bautista. Juan rechaza a Salomé, así que ella pide su cabeza como venganza por su rechazo.

(1) En la obra de Wilde, en baile de Salomé es descrito como “El Baile de los Siete Velos” con una gran implicación a que era algún tipo de striptease. Las danzas del vientre inspirados en “bailes de velos” eran bastante populares en Europa a fines de 1800, y es bastante probable que Wilde haya obtenido su inspiración de esto. Richard Strauss tomó la obra de Wilde y la convirtió en una ópera en donde El Baile de los Siete Velos se toma siete minutos en el escenario, y mientras Strauss clamaba que él pretendió que el baile se lleve a cabo de una forma “familiar”, la mayoría de los directores no perdieron la oportunidad de erotizarlo, así que El Baile de los Siete Velos ha sido equivalente a “baile sexy de stripper oriental” en el ojo público desde ese entonces - pero es importante el hacer notar que no hay ninguna mención de este baile en la Biblia.

(2) Los tres primeros versos de este párrafo están escritos desde la perspectiva de Salomé, mientras que los siguientes tres están escritos desde la perspectiva de un hombre. Todo el resto de los versos están escritos desde la perspectiva masculina.

(3) Las Mil y Una Noches es otro nombre de Los Cuentos de una Noche Arábica. Aunque la Salomé de la Biblia no era árabe, la mención de las Noches Arábicas encaja con las asociaciones orientales que fueron dejadas en el Baile de los Siete Velos. El antiguo Sumer y Babilonia estaban también localizados en lo que ahora es Irak, y algunos estudiosos han conectado la idea de los “siete velos” con el antiguo cuento Sumerio del Descendiente de Inanna. Innana era la diosa del amor, sexo, belleza, fertilidad, guerra, y poder; y también era alabada por los antiguos Babilonios como Ishtar. Antes de embarcarse en su descenso hacia el Inframundo, Ishtar se vistió con siete elementos mágicos que representaban aspectos de su poder, sólo para sacárselos uno a uno mientras pasase las puertas a la tierra de los muertos. Ishtar era también representada como poderosamente sexual, violenta, libidinosa y caprichosa, y puede que haya tenido más influencia en las representaciones modernas de Salomé que la Biblia misma.




サロメ
作詞:櫻井敦司
作曲:星野英彦

真っ赤に濡れて わたし踊る
七つのヴェイル舞うよ
狂わせてやる 酔わせてやる
おまえに口づけよう

ねえfemme fatale
ねえ血の味がする 炎に濡れたこの葡萄酒は
ねえfemme fatale
そうサファイアの瞳 噎せる麝香バビロンの薔薇だよ

おまえの唇 地獄の様に熱い

真っ赤に濡れて わたし踊る
七つのヴェイル舞うよ
狂わせてやる 酔わせてやる
おまえに口づけよう

ねえfemme fatale
ねえ汚れているでしょう おまえの血でこの唇は
ねえfemme fatale
さあ幕が降りるよ 千夜一夜紅く染まってゆく

おまえの唇 地獄よりも熱い

真っ赤に濡れて わたし踊る
七つのヴェイル舞うよ
狂わせてやる 酔わせてやる
おまえに口づけよう




Salome
Lyrics: Sakurai Atsushi
Music: Hoshino Hidehiko

Makka ni nurete     watashi odoru
Nanatsu no veiru mau yo
Kuruwasete yaru     yowasete yaru
Omae ni kuchizukeyou

Nee femme fatale
Nee chi no aji ga suru     honoo ni nureta kono budoushu wa
Nee femme fatale
Sou safaia no hitomi     museru jakou Babylon no bara da yo

Omae no kuchibiru     jigoku no you ni atsui

Makka ni nurete     watashi odoru
Nanatsu no veiru mau yo
Kuruwasete yaru     yowasete yaru
Omae ni kuchizukeyou

Nee femme fatale
Nee yogoreteiru deshou     omae no chi de kono kuchibiru wa
Nee femme fatale
Saa maku ga oriru yo     sen'ya ichiya akaku somatte yuku

Omae no kuchibiru     jigoku yori mo atsui

Makka ni nurete     watashi odoru
Nanatsu no veiru mau yo
Kuruwasete yaru     yowasete yaru
Omae ni kuchizukeyou