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Pinoa Icchio -踊るアトム-

Album: Atom Miraiha No. 9
2016.09.28 Lingua Sounda/Victor


PINOA ICCHIO -The Atom Dances-
Lyrics: Imai Hisashi
Music: Imai Hisashi

That chimaera's a jackalope1
A hybrida living in the moon2
Make sure never to mix the two
No, don't mix! It's hazardous3

Is it synthesis?
It's coexistence
Is it a rampage?
It's synergy

The crystal of love
I'm irregular
The crystal of love
The atoms dance the atoms dance

The double helix of romance4
And the shepherdess Rachael5
It's a danger to mix the two
Hey, don't mix! It's hazardous

Is it synthesis?
It's coexistence
Is it a rampage?
It's synergy

The crystal of love
I'm irregular
The crystal of love
The atoms dance the atoms dance

The crystal of love
I'm irregular
The crystal of love
The atoms dance the atoms dance
The crystal of love
I'm irregular
The crystal of love
The atoms dance the atoms dance


Note: The fact that the word "atomu" in the title is the English word "atom" in katakana, rather than the Japanese word "genshi" (which is much more commonly used in regular speech) suggests to me a reference to Tezuka Osamu's iconic manga Tetsuwan Atomu ("Mighty Atom"), published in English under the title Astro Boy. Astro Boy was one of the first majorly successful Japanese graphic novel series, and it both helped to define manga as a form of art and rocket Tezuka to stardom. The manga has attained great success and fame throughout the world, and these days Tezuka is hailed as Japan's Walt Disney, for his massive contributions to the world of comics and animation.

Anyhow, Astro Boy tells the story of a future world where a scientist creates a robot boy to replace the son he lost in a car accident. In this sense, the genesis of Astro Boy mirrors the genesis of the Italian folklore figure Pinocchio - a wooden boy created by a master carpenter to substitute for the son he never had. This, I would assume, is why Imai titled the song "Pinoa Icchio" - as a reference to Pinocchio. "Icchio" sounds to me like a faux-Italian version of the Japanese "ichi," meaning the number 1. This fits, since both Pinocchio and Astro Boy were the first of their kind.

Though Imai claimed the album title "Atomic Futurists No. 9" had nothing to do with the Italian Futurist movement, I very much doubt he's telling the truth on that one, given that he included a reference to Italian Futurism in "Dada Disco," the opening song of Buck-Tick's previous album, Arui wa Anarchy, and an invocation of Pinocchio certainly fits with the Italian idea evoked in the album title this time. For more information on Italian Futurism, see the "Dada Disco" notes section.

On a highly tangential note, the Disney film version of the Pinocchio story focuses heavily on the idea of young boys being tempted to sin (or, in Pinocchio's case, learning to resist temptation), and is therefore oddly appropriate to the theme of "Boy septem peccata mortalia" later on the album. Surely coincidence, but interesting all the same.

1) The Chimaera is a creature from Greek mythology, said to be the daughter of the monsters Typhon and Echidna. Different versions of the story exist, but the Chimaera is usually represented as a lion with a goat's head attached to her back, whose tail is a snake's head - i.e., she has three heads. She could breath fire and spit poison. She was fierce, vicious, and nasty as all hell, and lived to slaughter Greek heroes and peasants alike until she was defeated by the hero Bellerophon, who attacked her from the back of the winged horse Pegasus, thereby staying out of reach of her poison and fire breath. Was the Chimaera like an early, female version of Trogdor the Burninator? You decide.

In modern times, the word "chimaera" is often used to refer to any sort of monster made up of fusion of multiple animals. It is also used in biology and genetics to refer to an organism which contains cells with different sets of DNA. The word "chimaera" can also be used to refer to a person, group, or phenomenon who has been built up in someone's imagination out of all proportion to real-world evidence.

A jackalope is a creature from North American folklore that has the body of a jackrabbit and the horns of a pronghorn. It is similar to the Chimaera in that it is a mythological creature consisting of a blend of multiple animals. The word "jackalope" is a portmanteau of "jackrabbit" and "antelope," however, all reputable sources on the subject are at pains to point out that in fact, a jackrabbit is not a rabbit, and an pronghorn is not an antelope...however, you get the picture. It's a big, bunny-like thing with horns on its head. The jackalope was known as the "warrior rabbit" due to its aggressive nature - supposedly, it would attack people and gore them with its horns when threatened. Jackalopes were said to mate only during lightning storms, and their milk was said to be a powerful aphrodisiac. The best way to catch one and milk it was said to be leaving out a glass of good sipping whiskey (jackalopes love whiskey!), and waiting for the jackalope to get drunk and slow enough to catch. Jackalopes were also said to be able to imitate the human voice with eerie perfection, and would often join in the songs of cowboys as they sang around the campfire - though due to its small size, the jackalope always sang tenor. So many people still believe in the jackalope that there are a great many sites on the internet either claiming to have information on real jackalopes, or definitive information to debunk the jackalope "hoax."

2) "Hybrida" is just Imai-speak for "hybrid," i.e., a cross between two species. Scientifically speaking, a hybrid and a chimaera are entirely different things, but literarily speaking, they're related concepts. Here, Imai is clearly playing with the Japanese legend of the Rabbit in the Moon - Westerners may see a man's face in the moon's craters, but Japanese people see a rabbit. However, Imai's telling us here that it's not actually a rabbit, it's a jackalope.

3) "Mazeru na" ("don't mix") is a warning label often seen on common household cleaning chemicals which, when combined, could undergo a chemical reaction to produce lethal chlorine gas. It is a standard Japanese warning label, much like the international symbols for biohazard and radioactive material. "Kiken" is another standard warning label, meaning "hazardous."

4) "Double helix" refers to the structure of DNA molecules.

5) This line is a reference to the classic science fiction novel Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? by Philip K. Dick. This is clearly one of Imai's favorite books, as he's made reference to it before, most notably in "Cyborg Dolly:Soramimi:Phantom." In the novel, protagonist Rick Deckard cares for an electric pet sheep, before becoming involved with a frighteningly human-like android woman named Rachael. If you haven't read this book, by all means read it - it isn't one of the classics of sci-fi for nothing. Though the novel also served as the basis for the film "Blade Runner," which is a classic in its own right, the novel and the film are extremely different in both plot and tone, and while the film is an excellent piece of cinema, in my opinion the novel is deeper and more interesting.



PINOA ICCHIO -踊るアトム-
作詞:今井寿
作曲:今井寿

あのキマイラはジャカロープ
月に棲む hybrida
混ざり合ってはいけない
そう 混ぜるな危険だ

合成かな? 共存だろ 暴走かな? 相乗だろ

愛の結晶 ―クリスタル―
俺は例外 -イレギュラー―
愛の結晶 ―クリスタル―
踊る原子 ―アトム―

二重らせんのロマンス
羊飼いのレイチェル
混ざり合ったら危ない
ほら 混ぜるな危険だ

合成かな? 共存だろ 暴走かな? 相乗だろ

愛の結晶 ―クリスタル―
俺は例外 -イレギュラー―
愛の結晶 ―クリスタル―
踊る原子 ―アトム―

愛の結晶 ―クリスタル―
俺は例外 -イレギュラー―
愛の結晶 ―クリスタル―
踊る原子 ―アトム―
愛の結晶 ―クリスタル―
俺は例外 -イレギュラー―
愛の結晶 ―クリスタル―
踊る原子 ―アトム―



PINOA ICCHIO -Odoru Atomu-
Lyrics: Imai Hisashi
Music: Imai Hisashi

Ano kimaira wa jakaroopu
Tsuki ni sumu     hybrida
Mazariatte wa ikenai
Sou     mazeru na kiken da

Gousei ka na?     Kyouzon daro     Bousou ka na?     Soujou daro

Ai no kesshou -kurisutaru-
Ore wa reigai -iregyuraa-
Ai no kesshou -kurisutaru-
Odoru genshi -atomu-

Nijuu rasen no romansu
Hitsuji kai no Reicheru
Mazariattara abunai
Hora     mazeru na kiken da

Gousei ka na?     Kyouzon daro     Bousou ka na?     Soujou daro

Ai no kesshou -kurisutaru-
Ore wa reigai -iregyuraa-
Ai no kesshou -kurisutaru-
Odoru genshi -atomu-

Ai no kesshou -kurisutaru-
Ore wa reigai -iregyuraa-
Ai no kesshou -kurisutaru-
Odoru genshi -atomu-
Ai no kesshou -kurisutaru-
Ore wa reigai -iregyuraa-
Ai no kesshou -kurisutaru-
Odoru genshi -atomu-