Lyrics‎ > ‎Buck-Tick‎ > ‎

Pinoa Icchio -踊るアトム-

Album: Atom Miraiha No. 9
2016.09.28 Lingua Sounda/Victor


PINOA ICCHIO -The Atom Dances-
Lyrics: Imai Hisashi
Music: Imai Hisashi

That chimaera's a jackalope1
A hybrida living in the moon2
Make sure never to mix the two
No, don't mix! It's hazardous3

Is it synthesis?
It's coexistence
Is it a rampage?
It's synergy

The crystal of love
I'm irregular
The crystal of love
The atoms dance the atoms dance

The double helix of romance4
And the shepherdess Rachael5
It's a danger to mix the two
Hey, don't mix! It's hazardous

Is it synthesis?
It's coexistence
Is it a rampage?
It's synergy

The crystal of love
I'm irregular
The crystal of love
The atoms dance the atoms dance

The crystal of love
I'm irregular
The crystal of love
The atoms dance the atoms dance
The crystal of love
I'm irregular
The crystal of love
The atoms dance the atoms dance


Note: The fact that the word "atomu" in the title is the English word "atom" in katakana, rather than the Japanese word "genshi" (which is much more commonly used in regular speech) suggests to me a reference to Tezuka Osamu's iconic manga Tetsuwan Atomu ("Mighty Atom"), published in English under the title Astro Boy. Astro Boy was one of the first majorly successful Japanese graphic novel series, and it both helped to define manga as a form of art and rocket Tezuka to stardom. The manga has attained great success and fame throughout the world, and these days Tezuka is hailed as Japan's Walt Disney, for his massive contributions to the world of comics and animation.

Anyhow, Astro Boy tells the story of a future world where a scientist creates a robot boy to replace the son he lost in a car accident. In this sense, the genesis of Astro Boy mirrors the genesis of the Italian folklore figure Pinocchio - a wooden boy created by a master carpenter to substitute for the son he never had. This, I would assume, is why Imai titled the song "Pinoa Icchio" - as a reference to Pinocchio. "Icchio" sounds to me like a faux-Italian version of the Japanese "ichi," meaning the number 1. This fits, since both Pinocchio and Astro Boy were the first of their kind.

Though Imai claimed the album title "Atomic Futurists No. 9" had nothing to do with the Italian Futurist movement, I very much doubt he's telling the truth on that one, given that he included a reference to Italian Futurism in "Dada Disco," the opening song of Buck-Tick's previous album, Arui wa Anarchy, and an invocation of Pinocchio certainly fits with the Italian idea evoked in the album title this time. For more information on Italian Futurism, see the "Dada Disco" notes section.

On a highly tangential note, the Disney film version of the Pinocchio story focuses heavily on the idea of young boys being tempted to sin (or, in Pinocchio's case, learning to resist temptation), and is therefore oddly appropriate to the theme of "Boy septem peccata mortalia" later on the album. Surely coincidence, but interesting all the same.

1) The Chimaera is a creature from Greek mythology, said to be the daughter of the monsters Typhon and Echidna. Different versions of the story exist, but the Chimaera is usually represented as a lion with a goat's head attached to her back, whose tail is a snake's head - i.e., she has three heads. She could breath fire and spit poison. She was fierce, vicious, and nasty as all hell, and lived to slaughter Greek heroes and peasants alike until she was defeated by the hero Bellerophon, who attacked her from the back of the winged horse Pegasus, thereby staying out of reach of her poison and fire breath. Was the Chimaera like an early, female version of Trogdor the Burninator? You decide.

In modern times, the word "chimaera" is often used to refer to any sort of monster made up of fusion of multiple animals. It is also used in biology and genetics to refer to an organism which contains cells with different sets of DNA. The word "chimaera" can also be used to refer to a person, group, or phenomenon who has been built up in someone's imagination out of all proportion to real-world evidence.

A jackalope is a creature from North American folklore that has the body of a jackrabbit and the horns of a pronghorn. It is similar to the Chimaera in that it is a mythological creature consisting of a blend of multiple animals. The word "jackalope" is a portmanteau of "jackrabbit" and "antelope," however, all reputable sources on the subject are at pains to point out that in fact, a jackrabbit is not a rabbit, and an pronghorn is not an antelope...however, you get the picture. It's a big, bunny-like thing with horns on its head. The jackalope was known as the "warrior rabbit" due to its aggressive nature - supposedly, it would attack people and gore them with its horns when threatened. Jackalopes were said to mate only during lightning storms, and their milk was said to be a powerful aphrodisiac. The best way to catch one and milk it was said to be leaving out a glass of good sipping whiskey (jackalopes love whiskey!), and waiting for the jackalope to get drunk and slow enough to catch. Jackalopes were also said to be able to imitate the human voice with eerie perfection, and would often join in the songs of cowboys as they sang around the campfire - though due to its small size, the jackalope always sang tenor. So many people still believe in the jackalope that there are a great many sites on the internet either claiming to have information on real jackalopes, or definitive information to debunk the jackalope "hoax."

2) "Hybrida" is just Imai-speak for "hybrid," i.e., a cross between two species. Scientifically speaking, a hybrid and a chimaera are entirely different things, but literarily speaking, they're related concepts. Here, Imai is clearly playing with the Japanese legend of the Rabbit in the Moon - Westerners may see a man's face in the moon's craters, but Japanese people see a rabbit. However, Imai's telling us here that it's not actually a rabbit, it's a jackalope.

3) "Mazeru na" ("don't mix") is a warning label often seen on common household cleaning chemicals which, when combined, could undergo a chemical reaction to produce lethal chlorine gas. It is a standard Japanese warning label, much like the international symbols for biohazard and radioactive material. "Kiken" is another standard warning label, meaning "hazardous."

4) "Double helix" refers to the structure of DNA molecules.

5) This line is a reference to the classic science fiction novel Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? by Philip K. Dick. This is clearly one of Imai's favorite books, as he's made reference to it before, most notably in "Cyborg Dolly:Soramimi:Phantom." In the novel, protagonist Rick Deckard cares for an electric pet sheep, before becoming involved with a frighteningly human-like android woman named Rachael. If you haven't read this book, by all means read it - it isn't one of the classics of sci-fi for nothing. Though the novel also served as the basis for the film "Blade Runner," which is a classic in its own right, the novel and the film are extremely different in both plot and tone, and while the film is an excellent piece of cinema, in my opinion the novel is deeper and more interesting.


NOTE: The Spanish translation is a re-translation of the English translation by Cayce.  Cayce has only a marginal familiarity with Spanish, so the quality of this translation is unvetted, but Spanish-speaking fans, enjoy.

Pinoa Icchio - El Átomo Baila -
Letra: Imai Hisashi
Música: Imai Hisashi
Traducción: Natalia H.

Aquella quimera es un jackalope (1)
un híbrido viviendo en la luna (2)
Asegúrate de nunca mezclar los dos
No, no los mezcles! es peligroso (3)

¿Es acaso una síntesis?
Es la coexistencia
¿Es acaso un alboroto?
Es la sinergia

El cristal del amor
Soy irregular
El cristal del amor
El átomo baila, el átomo baila

La doble hélice del romance (4)
y la pastora Rachel (5)
Es peligroso mezclar las dos
Hey, no las mezcles! es peligroso


Nota: El hecho de que la palabra "atomu" en el título sea la palabra inglesa "atom" en katakana en vez de la palabra japonesa "genshi" (que es mucho más común en el idioma) sugiere una referencia al icónico manga de Tezuka Osamu, "Tesuwan Atomu" (Átomo Poderoso), publicado en inglés y español bajo el nombre de Astro Boy. Astro Boy fue uno de las primeras series gráficas japonesas con mayor éxito, y ayudó a definir el manga como una forma de arte y llevó a Tesuka a la fama. El manga ha obtenido un gran éxito y fama alrededor del mundo, y en este tiempo, Tezuka es llamado el Walt Disney Japonés por su masiva contribución al mundo de los comics y la animación.

Como sea, Astro Boy cuenta la historia de un mundo futuro en donde un científico crea un robot para reemplazar al hijo que perdió en un accidente de automóvil. En este sentido, el comienzo de Astro Boy es similar al comienzo de la figura folklórica italiana Pinocho - un niño de madera creado por un maestro carpintero para sustituir al hijo que nunca tuvo. Esto, podemos asumir, es la razón de por qué Imai le puso a la canción "Pinoa Icchio" - como una referencia a Pinocho. "Icchio" suena un tanto como una versión italiana de la palabra japonesa "ichi", que es el número 1. Esto encaja aquí, ya que Pinocho y Astro Boy fueron los primeros de su especie.

Aunque Imai dijo que el título del álbum "Atomic Futurist No.9" no tiene nada que ver con el movimiento Futurístico Italiano, dudamos un poco en que esté diciendo la verdad sobre eso, dado el hecho de que él incluyó referencias al Futurismo Italiano en "Dada Disco", la primera canción del álbum anterior de BUCK-TICK, Arui wa Anarchy, y una invocación a Pinocho ciertamente encaja con la idea italiana evocada en el título del álbum. Para más información sobre el Futurismo Italiano, leer la sección de notas de "Dada Disco".

Por otra parte, la versión Disney de la historia de Pinocho se enfoca bastante en la idea de pequeños siendo tentados a pecar (o, en el caso de Pinocho, aprender a resistir la tentación), y eso es extrañamente apropiado para el tema de "BOY septem peccata mortalia" que viene después en el álbum. Es probable que sea una coincidencia, pero es una muy interesante.

(1) La Quimera es una criatura de la mitología Griega, se dice que es la hija de los monstruos Tofón y Equidna. Existen diferentes versiones de la historia, pero la Quimera es usualmente representada como un león con una cabeza de cabra pegada a su espalda, con cola de una cabeza de serpiente - que por sí tiene tres cabezas. Podía respirar fuego y escupir veneno. Era valiente, viciosa, y súper peligrosa, y vivía para asesinar héroes griegos y plebeyos hasta que fue vencida por el héroe Beleforonte, que la atacó desde la espalda de su caballo alado Pegaso, quedando fuera del alcance de su veneno y respiración de fuego.

En tiempos modernos, la palabra "quimera" es usualmente usada para referirse a cualquier tipo de monstruo hecho de una fusión de múltiples animales. También se usa en la biología y en la genética para referirse a un organismo que contiene células con distintos grupos de ADN. La palabra "quimera" también puede ser usada para referirse a una persona, grupo o fenómeno que ha sido construído en la imaginación de alguien fuera de toda proporción de evidencia real.

Un jackalope es una criatura del folklore NorteAmericano que tiene el cuerpo de un conejo y los cuernos de un antílope. Es similar a la quimera por el hecho de que es una criatura mitológica que consiste en una mezcla de múltiples animales. La palabra "jackalope" es la mezcla de "jackrabbit" y "antelope". Es una cosa grande con forma de conejo y cuernos en su cabeza. El jackalope fue conocido como el "conejo guerrero" debido a su naturaleza agresiva - se supone que atacaba a las personas con sus cuernos si se sentía en peligro. Se decía que los jackalopes sólo se reproducían durante las tormentas eléctricas, y también que su leche era un poderoso afrodisíaco. La mejor forma de atrapar uno y ordeñarlo era dejando un vaso de vidrio con whiskey y esperar a que el jackalope esté lo suficientemente ebrio como para andar rápido. También se dice que los jackalopes son capaces de imitar la voz humana a la perfección, y suelen unirse a las canciones que los vaqueros suelen cantar alrededor de las fogatas - aunque debido a su pequeño tamaño, los jackalopes siempre cantan en tenor. Tanta gente sigue creyendo en los jackalopes que hay muchas páginas en internet que claman tener información real de ellos.

(2) "Hybrida" es sólo la forma en que Imai usa para "Hybrid" (una cruza entre dos especies). Científicamente hablando, un híbrido y una quimera son cosas completamente distintas, pero literalmente hablando, con conceptos relacionados. Aquí, Imai está claramente jugando con la leyenda Japonesa del Conejo y la Luna - los  occidentales puede que vean un rostro en los cráteres de la luna, pero los japoneses ven un conejo. Lo que Imai nos está diciendo aquí es que en realidad no es un conejo, sino un jackalope.

(3) "Mazeru na" ("no mezclar") es una etiqueta de advertencia que por lo general se ve en los detergentes químicos para hogares que, combinados, pueden llevar a cabo una reacción química que puede causar gases letales. Es una etiqueta de advertencia común en Japón, así como los logos internacionales de material radiactivo. "Kiken" es otro tipo de etiqueta de peligro, significa "peligroso"

(4) "Doble hélice" se refiere a la estructura de las moléculas de ADN.

(5) Este verso es una referencia a la novela clásica de ciencia ficción Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? de Philip K. Dick. Este es claramente uno de los libros favoritos de Imai, ya que ha hecho referencia a él antes, más notablemente en "Cyborg Dolly:Soramimi:Phantom". En la novela, el protagonista Rick Deckard cuida de una mascota eléctrica que es un cordero antes de relacionarse con mujer androide llamada Rachel. Si no han leído este libro, háganlo - no es uno de los clásicos de la ciencia ficción por nada. Aunque la novela también sirvió como la base para la película "Blade Runner", que es un clásico por sí sola, la novela y el filme con extremadamente distintos, tanto en tema como en tono, y mientras la película es una excelente pieza cinemática, en nuestra opinión la novela es más profunda e interesante.


PINOA ICCHIO -踊るアトム-
作詞:今井寿
作曲:今井寿

あのキマイラはジャカロープ
月に棲む hybrida
混ざり合ってはいけない
そう 混ぜるな危険だ

合成かな? 共存だろ 暴走かな? 相乗だろ

愛の結晶 ―クリスタル―
俺は例外 -イレギュラー―
愛の結晶 ―クリスタル―
踊る原子 ―アトム―

二重らせんのロマンス
羊飼いのレイチェル
混ざり合ったら危ない
ほら 混ぜるな危険だ

合成かな? 共存だろ 暴走かな? 相乗だろ

愛の結晶 ―クリスタル―
俺は例外 -イレギュラー―
愛の結晶 ―クリスタル―
踊る原子 ―アトム―

愛の結晶 ―クリスタル―
俺は例外 -イレギュラー―
愛の結晶 ―クリスタル―
踊る原子 ―アトム―
愛の結晶 ―クリスタル―
俺は例外 -イレギュラー―
愛の結晶 ―クリスタル―
踊る原子 ―アトム―



PINOA ICCHIO -Odoru Atomu-
Lyrics: Imai Hisashi
Music: Imai Hisashi

Ano kimaira wa jakaroopu
Tsuki ni sumu     hybrida
Mazariatte wa ikenai
Sou     mazeru na kiken da

Gousei ka na?     Kyouzon daro     Bousou ka na?     Soujou daro

Ai no kesshou -kurisutaru-
Ore wa reigai -iregyuraa-
Ai no kesshou -kurisutaru-
Odoru genshi -atomu-

Nijuu rasen no romansu
Hitsuji kai no Reicheru
Mazariattara abunai
Hora     mazeru na kiken da

Gousei ka na?     Kyouzon daro     Bousou ka na?     Soujou daro

Ai no kesshou -kurisutaru-
Ore wa reigai -iregyuraa-
Ai no kesshou -kurisutaru-
Odoru genshi -atomu-

Ai no kesshou -kurisutaru-
Ore wa reigai -iregyuraa-
Ai no kesshou -kurisutaru-
Odoru genshi -atomu-
Ai no kesshou -kurisutaru-
Ore wa reigai -iregyuraa-
Ai no kesshou -kurisutaru-
Odoru genshi -atomu-