Album: Arui wa Anarchy
2014.06.04 Lingua Sounda/Tokuma Japan


Phantom Voltaire
Lyrics: Sakurai Atsushi
Music: Imai Hisashi

Is it right that you can't sleep?
You've got a nightmare knocking on your door
Bastard's comin' in mad1

Now the men are laughing mad
Come and twine your legs with mine2
La Danse Macabre3

Don't you dare want for anything
You are me a phantom
Yet you are Death itself!
Isn't that right!?

Ah, perhaps I could laugh
A quarter-century just like an operetta
Cabaret Voltaire
So let's dance a little more
After all, we've got nowhere to go home to
Cabaret Voltaire

He's got a Walther on the dashboard4
In his lips he's got a cigarette
Bastard's comin' in mad

Now the women are laughing mad
Just like Mephistopheles5
Oh, oui, Champs-Élysées6

Don't you dare fear for anything
Split through the darkness, phantom
Yet you are Death itself!
Isn't that right!?

Ah, I think I could smile
A quarter-century you're an operetta
Cabaret Voltaire
Dance with me a little more
After all, the dawn's never gonna come again
Cabaret Voltaire

Don't you dare want for anything
You are me a phantom
Yet you are a Poem itself!7

Don't you dare fear for anything
Split through the darkness, phantom
Yet you are Death itself!
Isn't that right!?

Ah, perhaps I could laugh
A quarter-century just like an operetta
Cabaret Voltaire
So let's dance a little more
After all, we've got nowhere to go home to
Cabaret Voltaire


Note on the title: Among afficiandos of goth music, the phrase “Cabaret Voltaire” may most readily call to mind the British industrial fusion unit of the same name, famed in dark music circles for their experimentations in combining pop hooks with various types of synthesizer music ranging from house and synthpop to industrial.

However, what you may not know is that the band Cabaret Voltaire took their name from the name of an actual cabaret club in Zurich, Switzerland, opened in 1916 by Hugo Ball, Marcel Janco, Richard Huelsenbeck, Tristan Tzara, and Jean Arp, as a center for anarchic and political art.  Cabaret Voltaire became a center for avante-garde art, especially the Dadaist movement (for a note on Dada, see "Dada Disco").  Events held at the Cabaret Voltaire often featured performance art, spoken word, and other experimental acts, and often dealt with difficult, violent imagery related to WWI, with a strong anti-war slant.  In addition to performances, art exhibitions were also held at the Cabaret Voltaire, including work by such now-famous experimental artists as Wassily Kandinsky (Russian abstract painter and member of the Bauhaus school), Paul Klee, Georgio de Chirico (founder of the Metaphysical School, a precursor to Surrealism), Sophie Tauber-Arp, and Max Ernst.

Though the heyday of the Cabaret Voltaire barely lasted more than a year, the artistic philosophy that blossomed there has had far-reaching influence into the present day.  When the cabaret building was slated for closure in the early 2000’s, a group of protesters who identified as neo-Dadaists illegally occupied the space and held numerous events there over a period of three months, drawing crowds of thousands.  Police eventually evicted the protesters from the building, but the building itself has now been restored and is once again functioning as a cabaret.

So…why Voltaire, you ask?  Voltaire himself was a hugely influential French Enlightenment writer, political satirist and philosopher known for his acid wit, attacks on the church, and advocacy for political freedom and separation of church and state.  Considering himself a Deist, he rejected organized religion and dogma and was an outspoken advocate of religious tolerance, though he was also known for his anti-Semitic and anti-Islamic views.  His most famous work is the satirical novella Candide, which was later transformed into a Broadway musical with music by Leonard Bernstein and lyrics by Lillian Hellman, Dorothy Parker, Stephen Sondheim, Richard Wilbur, and others. If you've ever heard the phrase "all for the best in this best of all possible worlds," that's Voltaire.

1) This is the first of many lines in the song that contain a kanji play - Sakurai has spelled the helping verb "kuru" (part of Japanese verb conjugations and too complicated to explain here) with the kanji "kuruu," meaning "crazy."  The word "yatsu," which I often translate as "bastard," literally just means "guy," or "bloke," but it has a slangy, rude, ne'er-do-well connotation.

2) I used the word "legs" in my translation of this line, but in fact, the word Sakurai used in the original Japanese here is "koshi," meaning "hips." A more accurate translation might be "come and grind your hips on mine," except that the verb "karameru" generally refers to something long and skinny like a thread or a snake, not something flat and blunt like hips. Therefore, I wanted to translate "karameru" as "twine," and you can't really twine hips, so I wrote "legs" instead.

I believe Sakurai used "karameru" with the word "hips" in this context because "karameru" is generally the verb used to refer to physical sexual advances, especially onstage fanservice...when Sakurai sneaks up behind Imai and puts his arm around him, that's "karami" (same verb, different form) so use your imagination. Also, given the reference in the next line to the Danse Macabre (see the following note) Sakurai may be referring to hip bones, not flesh-and-blood hips, in which case the verb "karameru" would be more appropriate.

However, in this song, given the later references to dancing, I thought "legs" would be a better fit than "hips." Either way, the sexual connotation is more or less the same.

3) The Danse Macabre, or Dance of Death, refers to a genre of late-Medieval European allegorical paintings, etc. depicting Death (in the form of a skeleton) leading a line of people from all walks of life, from King to beggar, to the grave. The purpose of Danse Macabre pieces was to remind people to be humble, because life is short, people are fragile, and death comes to everyone, no matter their wealth or status. Danse Macabre works are closely related to the concept of Memento Mori. Numerous musical works have also been titled "Danse Macabre" or something related.

4) Walther is a German firearms manufacturer most famous for its pistols. James Bond is depicted carrying a Walther pistol.

5) Mephistopheles is the name of the devil in the legend of Dr. Faust, a German folktale about a man who sells his soul to Satan, and has become a stock devil character throughout literature. Generally he is portrayed as being an on-the-ground henchman of big man Lucifer. 

6) The Champs-Élysées is the most famous street in Paris.  It runs straight through the center of the city, past numerous historical sites and monuments, and has become known in modern times as the center of French high fashion. The name means "Elysian Fields," the part of the Underworld in Greek mythology where heroes would go after death (a sort of heaven.) Sakurai most likely borrowed the phrase from French/American singer Joe Dassin's hit song "Les Champs-Élysées." 

7) This line contains a kanji play on the earlier line "yet your are Death itself." In Japanese, the word for death and the word for poem are pronounced the same way ("shi").

Wow that was a lot of notes. As we say in Japan, otsukare.



NOTE: The Spanish translation is a re-translation of the English translation by Cayce.  Cayce has only a marginal familiarity with Spanish, so the quality of this translation is unvetted, but Spanish-speaking fans, enjoy.

Phantom Voltaire
Letra: Sakurai Atsushi
Música: Imai Hisashi
Traducción: Natalia H.

Es verdad que no puedes dormir?
Tienes una pesadilla golpeando tu puerta
El bastardo viene enojado (1)

Ahora los hombres ríen alocadamente
Ven y entrelaza tus piernas con las mías (2)
La Danse Macabre (3)

No te atrevas a desear algo
Eres para mi un fantasma
Aunque seas la Muerte misma!
Estoy en lo correcto!?

Ah, quizás solo podría reír
Por un cuarto de siglo así como una opereta
Cabaré Voltaire
Vamos a bailar un poco más
Después de eso, no tenemos a dónde ir a casa
Cabaré Voltaire

Él tiene un Walther en el tablero (4)
En sus caderas tiene un cigarro
El bastardo viene enojado

Ahora las mujeres ríen alocadamente
Así como Mefistófeles (5)
Oh, oui, Champs-Élysées (6)

No te atrevas a temerle a algo
Divide la oscuridad, fantasma
Aunque seas la Muerte misma!
Es eso correcto!?

Ah, creo que podría sonreír
Por un cuarto de siglo eres una opereta
Cabaré Voltaire
Baila conmigo un poco más
Después de todo, el amanecer nunca más volverá
Cabaré Voltaire

No te atrevas a desear nada
Para mi eres un fantasma
Aunque eres un Poema! (7)

No te atrevas a temerle a algo
Divide la oscuridad, fantasma
Aunque seas la Muerte misma!
Es eso correcto!?

Ah, quizás podría sonreír
Por un cuarto de siglo como una opereta
Cabaré Voltaire
Así que vamos a bailar un poco más
Después de todo, no tenemos a dónde ir a casa
Cabaré Voltaire


NOTA SOBRE EL TÍTULO: Entre los aficionados de la música gótica, la frase “Cabaret Voltaire” puede traer a la memoria la fusión industrial Británica del mismo nombre, famosa en los círculos de música oscura por su experimentación en combinar enganches pop con varios tipos de música sintetizada variando desde house y synthpop a industrial.

Aunque, lo que puedes no saber es que la banda Cabaret Voltaire tomó su nombre de  un cabaré de verdad en Zurich, Suiza, abierto en 1016 por Hugo Ball, Marcel Janco, Richard Huelsenbeck, Tristan Tzara, y Jean Arp, como un centro de arte anárquico y político. Cabaret Voltaire se convirtió en el centro del arte avante-garde, especialmente del movimiento Dadaísta (para una nota sobre Dada, ver “Dada Disco”). Los eventos llevados a cabo en el Cabaret Voltaire por lo general eran sobre arte performativo,  palabra hablada, y otros actos experimentales, y por lo general trataba con imágenes difíciles y violentas relacionadas con la Primera Guerra Mundial, con un una fuerte inclinación anti-guerra. En adición a las presentaciones, exhibiciones de arte eran presentadas en el Cabaret Voltaire, incluyendo trabajos de artistas experimentales como Wassily Kandinsky (pintor Ruso abstracto y miembro de la escuela Bauhaus), Paul Klee, Georgio de Chirico (fundador de la Escuela Metafísica, una precursora del Surrealismo), Sophie Tauber-Arp, y Max Ernst.

Aunque el apogeo del Cabaret Voltaire apenas y duró un poco más de un año, la filosofía artística que allí floreció tiene una gran influencia en el mundo actual. Cuando el edificio del Cabaret fue programado por cierre a principios del 2000, un grupo de protestantes quienes se identificaban como neo-Dadaístas ocuparon ilegalmente el espacio y tuvieron numerosos eventos allí por un período de tres meses, atrayendo públicos de miles. La policía pudo sacar a los protestantes del edificio, pero la construcción en si ha sido restaurada y funciona nuevamente como un cabaré.

Entonces, por qué Voltaire? Voltaire mismo fue un tremendamente influyente escritor  Francés de la Ilustración (también fue un satírico político y filósofo) conocido por su ácido ingenio, ataques a la iglesia, y su defensa de la libertad política y la separación de la iglesia del estado. Auto-considerado un Deísta, él negaba la religión organizada y el dogma y era un abierto defensor de la tolerancia religiosa, aunque era también conocido por sus puntos de vista anti-Semita y anti-Islámico. Su trabajo más famoso es la novela satírica Candid , que más tarde fue transformada en un musical de Broadway con música escrita por Leonard Bernstein y con letra por Lillian Hellman, Dorothy Parker, Stephen Sondheim, Richard Wilbur y otros. Si alguna vez has escuchado la frase “todo por lo mejor en este mejor de todos los mundos posibles”, ese es Voltaire.

(1) Este es el primer de muchos versos en la canción que contiene un juego de kanji – Sakurai ha deletreado el verbo auxiliar “kuru” (parte de unas conjugaciones verbales Japonesas y muy complicadas para ser explicadas aquí) con el kanji “kuruu” que significa “loco”. La palabra “yatsu”, que por lo general traduzco como “bastardo”, literalmente sólo significa “tipo”, o “individuo”, pero tiene una connotación de una jerga ruda.

(2) Se usó la palabra “piernas” en la traducción de este verso, pero de hecho, la palabra que Sakurai usó en los lyrics originales en Japonés es “koshi”, que significa “caderas”. Una traducción más precisa sería “ven y pulveriza tus caderas con las mías”, excepto que el verbo “karameru” por lo general se refiere a algo largo y delgado como una cuerda o una serpiente, no algo plano y  desafilado como las caderas. Así que, se quiso traducir “karameru” como “enlazar”, y en la vida real no puedes entrelazar caderas, así que en vez de eso se escribió “piernas”.

Creo que Sakurai usó “karameru” con la palabra “caderas” en este contexto porque “karameru” es generalmente el verbo usado para referirse a los avances físicamente sexuales, especialmente el fanservice que se hace en el escenario… cuando Sakurai va por detrás de Imai y lo rodea con los brazos, eso es “karami” (mismo verbo, forma distinta) así que usen su imaginación. También, dado la referencia en el próximo verso al Danse Macabre (ver la siguiente nota) Sakurai se puede referir a los huesos de la cadera, y no a las caderas de carne y sangre, en este caso el verbo “karameru” sería más apropiado.

(3) El Danse Macabre, o Baile de la Muerte, se refiere a un género de las pinturas alegóricas a fines de la Europa Medieval, que representan la Muerte (en forma de esqueleto) llevando una línea de gente de todo tipo, desde el Rey hasta el Mendigo, a la tumba. El propósito de las piezas del Danse Macabre era recordarle a la gente el ser humilde, porque la vida es corta, las personas son frágiles, y la muerte viene por todos, sin importar su riqueza o estatus. Los trabajos de Danse Macabre están cercanamente ligados con el concepto de Memento Mori. Numerosos trabajos musicales también tiene el título de “Danse Macabre” o algo relacionado.

(4) Walther es un fabricante de armas de fuego mayormente conocido por sus pistolas. James Bond es representado llevando una pistola Walther.

(5) Mefistófeles es el nombre del demonio en la leyenda del Doctor Faustus, un cuento popular sobre un hombre quien le vende su alma a Satanás, y se ha convertido en un abastecedor personajes malignos a lo largo de la literatura. Es generalmente representado como el secuaz en la tierra del gran Lucifer.

(6) El Champs-Élysées es la calle más famosa de París. Va directamente hacia el centro de la ciudad, pasa por numerosos sitios históricos y monumentos, y se ha vuelto conocido en estos tiempos como el centro de la alta costura Francesa. El nombre significa “Los Campos Elysian”, la parte del inframundo en la mitología griega en donde los héroes van después de morir (una especie de Paraíso). No estoy segura del por qué Sakurai la incluyó aquí, pero quizás la está usando como un símbolo de decadencia estética.

(7) Este verso contiene un juego de Kanji al principio “aunque tú eres la Muerte misma”. En Japonés, la palabra para muerte y la palabra para poema son pronunciadas de la misma forma (“shi”).



Phantom Voltaire
作詞:櫻井敦司
作曲:今井寿

眠れないんだね? 悪夢がドアを叩く
奴がやって狂

男が 笑い狂 腰を絡めて狂ぜ
La Danse Macabre

何も欲しがるな お前は俺PHANTOM
お前こそ死だ! そうだろう!?

ちょっと笑えるぜ 四半世紀 まるでOPERETTA
Cabaret Voltaire
もっと踊ろうぜ どうせ帰れる場所は無いさ
Cabaret Voltaire

ダッシュボードにワルサー 唇にはシガレット
奴はやって狂

女が 笑い狂 メフィストフェレス的だぜ
Oh    Oui    シャンゼリゼ

何も恐れるな 闇 つんざけよPHANTOM
お前こそ死だ! そうだろう!?

ちょっと笑えるわ 四半世紀 あなたOPERETTA
Cabaret Voltaire
もっと踊りましょう どうせ夜明けなんて来ないわ
Cabaret Voltaire

何も欲しがるな お前は俺PHANTOM
お前こそ詩だ!

何も恐れるな 闇 つんざけよPHANTOM
お前こそ死だ! そうだろう!?

ちょっと笑えるぜ 四半世紀 まるでOPERETTA
Cabaret Voltaire
もっと踊ろうぜ どうせ帰れる場所は無いさ
Cabaret Voltaire




Phantom Voltaire
Lyrics: Sakurai Atsushi
Music: Imai Hisashi

Nemurenain da ne? Akumu ga doa wo tataku
Yatsu ga yattekuru

Otoko ga     warai kuru     koshi wo karametekuru ze
La Danse Macabre

Nani mo hoshigaru na     omae wa ore PHANTOM
Omae koso shi da!     Sou darou?

Chotto waraeru ze     shihanseiki     marude OPERETTA
Cabaret Voltaire
Motto odorou ze     douse kaereru basho wa nai sa
Cabaret Voltaire

Dasshuboodo ni warusaa     kuchibiru ni wa shigaretto
Yatsu wa yatte kuru

Onna ga     warai kuru     mefisutoferesu teki da ze
Oh     Oui     shanzerize

Nani mo osoreru na     yami     tsuzake yo PHANTOM
Omae koso shi da!     Sou darou?

Chotto waraeru wa     shihanseiki     anata OPERETTA
Cabaret Voltaire
Motto odorimashou     douse yoake nante konai wa
Cabaret Voltaire

Nani mo hoshigaru na     omae wa ore PHANTOM
Omae koso shi da!  

Nani mo osoreru na     yami     tsuzake yo PHANTOM
Omae koso shi da!     Sou darou?

Chotto waraeru ze     shihanseiki     marude OPERETTA
Cabaret Voltaire
Motto odorou ze     douse kaereru basho wa nai sa
Cabaret Voltaire