Lyrics‎ > ‎Buck-Tick‎ > ‎

ノスタルジア -ヰタ メカニカリスー

Album: No. 0
2018.03.24 Lingua Sounda/Victor


Nostalgia - Vita Mechanicalis -
Lyrics: Imai Hisashi
Music: Imai Hisashi

People employ words that never scatter
Eating the pantograph sparks
Walking Cubist through the twilit plaza1
What those eyes saw
Was the back of us light-years into the future
The dynamo turns2

Vita mechanicalis vita machina decade
Vita mechanicalis vita machina decade

Bright red iron ingots
Populated country scenery
Celluloid human silhouettes
Flickering in the twilight
Whistling echoing in the street
And the noise of windmills
Someone called out to me
But there was no one nearby
The dynamo turns

The crescent moon hangs down
Over the bright metropolis night3
Highway ramp mass exodus
Δ Delta Ι Iota Λ Lambda Ξ Ksi4
Laughing voices, signs, ether cocktails5
A meeting of machines and black umbrellas6
The dynamo turns

Vita mechanicalis vita machina decade
Vita mechanicalis vita machina decade
Vita mechanicalis vita machina decade
Vita mechanicalis vita machina decade

Bright red iron ingots
Populated country scenery
Celluloid human silhouettes
Flickering in the twilight
Whistling echoing in the street
And the noise of windmills
Someone called out to me
But there was no one nearby
The dynamo turns

Bright red iron ingots
Populated country scenery
Celluloid human silhouettes
Flickering in the twilight
Whistling echoing in the street
And the noise of windmills
Someone called out to me
But there was no one nearby
The dynamo turns

2 3 5 7     2 3 5 7 7

Note on the title: Vita Mechanicalis ("The Life Mechanical," styled "Wita Makinikalis" in Japanese) is the title of a short story collection by Japanese Showa-era author Inagaki Taruho. Though less well known internationally compared with certain other writers of his generation (such as Mishima Yukio), in Japan, Inagaki was highly influential, and hailed as one of the most unique voices of the Showa era. Mishima himself declared that Inagaki had given birth to a new era in Japanese literature (though both of them were known to hang out in gay bars, so that might have just been buddy-talk). Influenced by French symbolist poetry and surrealist art, Inagaki was famous for writing very short stories more reminiscent of poetry than traditional narrative, many of which employed a series of recurring motifs with which Inagaki was obsessed: flying machines, gas lamps, comets, tin moons, Saturn, black cats, cobalt blue, gay bars, and beautiful teens. If all that sounds disturbingly familiar, it's because the album cover for No. 0 makes heavy use of Inagaki-verse imagery, and could be seen as a sort of composite illustration of the lyrics to this song mixed with the lyrics to "Hikari no Teikoku," which also draw heavily on Inagaki's imagery. In fact, the No. 0 album cover and tour pamphlet imagery closely resemble the original covers for Inagaki's Vita Mechanicalis. It's also worth pointing out that Inagaki's title, Vita Mechanicalis, is itself a reference to another work - Mori Ogai's fictionalized bildungsroman autobiography Vita Sexualis.

For once, Imai didn't deny the heavy influence of Inagaki's work on his lyrics for this album - he freely admitted that he was deliberately evoking Inagaki's world, though Imai also used different katakana for "Vita Mechanicalis," perhaps for copyright reasons. Given Imai's penchant for sci-fi, it's no wonder he feels inspired by Inagaki, though it's also interesting to note that Sakurai has developed a similarly concrete and distinctive language of symbols and images over the years, so the technique has already been a part of Buck-Tick's creative universe for a long time.

1) Cubism was an early 20th-century art movement, typified by abstracted representations of figures and objects which appeared to have been broken into shards, or "cubes." Pablo Picasso and Georges Braque are the most famous artists associated with Cubism. The development of Cubism had a significant influence on subsequent artistic movements, including such Imai favorites as Futurism, Dadaism, and Constructivism (see the notes on "Dada Disco" for more info). In PHY magazine, Imai said that seeing an exhibit of Cubist artworks as a small child was a defining moment in the development of his artistic consciousness - he realized that art didn't have to be true to life to be meaningful and valuable.

The title of "Guernica no Yoru" is also a reference to a Picasso painting.

2) In every recurrence of this phrase throughout the song, Imai uses non-standard kanji meaning "possible to turn," rather than the usual kanji for a factory in operation. This suggests that he's implying future possibilities rather than something in the here and now.

3) Metropolis is a dystopian silent film released in 1927 in Weimar Germany by director Fritz Lang, based on a novel by Thea von Harbou (Harbou also contributed to the screenplay for the film). The film is one of the first dystopian sci-fi films ever made, and has had a tremendous influence on the genre ever since its release, particularly due to its distinctive, immersively-realized aesthetic and special effects. The film's art direction drew on elements of Cubist, Bauhaus, Constructivist and Art Deco design to create an encompassing industrial dystopia churning with brutal factories, towering skyscrapers, and highway ramps thick with traffic. The film's opening sequence consists of extended shots of the majestic factories in operation in much the same way that the introduction to this song evokes factory sounds. The entire No. 0 album contains many elements which also appear in Fritz Lang's film - in the film, the powerful industry moguls reside in a massive structure known as the New Tower of Babel, and the Tower of Babel story serves as a parable which catalyzes the events of the film's plot (see the notes on "Babel" for more info). In addition, the film's plot involves the creation of a horrifically lifelike robotic woman who bewitches the men of the city into crime and violence with her frenzied flapper-stripper dances, like a futuristic robot Salome (see "Salome").

Metropolis is also the title of a manga by the acclaimed Tezuka Osamu, who also wrote Astro Boy (Tetsuwan Atomu - see "Pinoa Icchio" for more info). Tezuka's Metropolis manga was loosely influenced by Lang's Metropolis film, and it's possible that Tezuka's manga is what inspired Imai to watch Lang's film. Given Imai's interests, it seems certain that he's familiar with both works.

4) This is a string of Greek letters that (as far as we can tell) doesn't mean anything. The letters Delta and Ksi appear on the No. 0 album cover, in direct reference to the lyrics of this song. If there's a greater meaning behind this specific sequence of letters, we haven't found it. But given the prime number reference at the end of the song, it seems possible that Imai was looking up math stuff, and might have selected these Greek letters simply because they're used in mathematical equations.

5) Diethyl ether, commonly known simply as "ether," is a volatile organic solvent which was commonly used as a medical anesthetic in the late 1800's and early 1900's before the development of safer and more effective drugs. Ether was also used as a recreational drug, in which case it was either inhaled or ingested as a cocktail, often poured over milk. Ether was used as a replacement for alcohol, particularly in Ireland in the late 1800's, and also in Poland. It was even consumed in combination with alcohol - British occultist Aleister Crowley was also a prodigious drug user and amateur mixologist who developed a great number of creative cocktail recipes, some of which contained ether. Users report that ether can produce a stupefying hallucinogenic and spiritually transformative high - but don't get too excited, because ether consumption can also cause all kinds of bad health effects, and it's also highly addictive.

6) This line is an allusion to the work of the French poet Comte de Lautréamont, whose dark, sarcastic work has often been grouped with the work of other Buck-Tick favorite poets Charles Baudelaire (see "Baudelaire de Nemurenai") and Arthur Rimbaud (see "Survival Dance"). His work, especially his magnum opus, Les Chants de Maldoror, exerted a strong influence on many later artists, especially the Surrealists - Dali, Breton, Artaud, Duchamp, Man Ray, Ernst, and Tangguy all mention being inspired by Lautréamont.

The word which I translated as "black umbrella" literally means "bat umbrella" in Japanese. The "bat umbrella" was so named because its large black shape gave it a strong resemblance to a bat. The word usually refers to the early mass-produced umbrellas seen in the earlier half of the 20th century. Imai clearly likes the image, because he's used it before, especially in the song "Umbrella." Here, it seems he's using the image to flesh out his gaslight romance steampunk paradise.

7) This sequence of prime numbers is special because not only are 2, 3, 5, and 7 all primes, but when added they equal another prime (17), and not only that, but the number 2,357 is also a prime. Imai confirmed in PHY magazine that this special prime property was the reason he chose these particular digits.




NOTE: The Spanish translation is a re-translation of the English translation by Cayce.  Cayce has only a marginal familiarity with Spanish, so the quality of this translation is unvetted, but Spanish-speaking fans, enjoy.

Nostalgia - Vita Mechanicalis - 
Letra: Imai Hisashi
Música: Imai Hisashi
Traducción: Natalia H.

La gente usa palabras que nunca se dispersan
Comiéndose las chispas del pantógrafo
Un Caminante Cubista a través de la plaza iluminada con el crepúsculo (1)
Aquello que esos ojos vieron
Eran nuestras espaldas a cientos de años en el futuro
El dínamo gira (2)

Vita mechanicalis, la década de la vita machina
Vita mechanicalis, la década de la vita machina

Lingotes de acero rojo brillante
Un paraje de un país poblado
Siluetas de celuloides humanos
Parpadeando en el futuro
Un silbido haciendo eco en la calle
Y el ruido de los molinos de viento
Alguien me está llamando
Pero no hay nadie a mi alrededor
El dínamo gira

La luna creciente está colgada al revés
Sobre la noche de la brillante metrópolis (3)
Un éxodo masivo en la rampa de la autopista
Δ Delta I Iota Λ Lambda Ξ Ksi (4)
Voces que ríen, señaléticas, cocteles de éter (5)
Una reunión de máquinas y negros paraguas (6)
El dínamo gira

Vita mechanicalis, la década de la vita machina
Vita mechanicalis, la década de la vita machina
Vita mechanicalis, la década de la vita machina
Vita mechanicalis, la década de la vita machina

Lingotes de acero rojo brillante
Un paraje de un país poblado
Siluetas de celuloides humanos
Parpadeando en el futuro
Un silbido haciendo eco en la calle
Y el ruido de los molinos de viento
Alguien me está llamando
Pero no hay nadie a mi alrededor
El dínamo gira

Lingotes de acero rojo brillante
Un paraje de un país poblado
Siluetas de celuloides humanos
Parpadeando en el futuro
Un silbido haciendo eco en la calle
Y el ruido de los molinos de viento
Alguien me está llamando
Pero no hay nadie a mi alrededor
El dínamo gira

2   3   5   7     2   3   5   7   (7)


Nota sobre el título: Vita Mechanicalis (“La Vida Mecánica”, o “Vita Makinikalis” en Japonés) es el título de una colección de cuentos por el autor de la era Showa Inagaki Taruho. Aunque menos conocido internacionalmente comparado con otros escritores de su generación (como Mishima Yukio), en Japón, Inagaki era bastante influyente, y alabado como una de las voces más únicas de la era Showa. El mismo Mishima declaró que Inagaki había dado luz a una nueva era en la literatura Japonesa (aunque ambos eran conocidos por pasar ratos en bares gay, así que eso sólo puede ser una opinión de amigo). Influenciado por la poesía simbolista Francesa y el arte surrealista, Inagaki era famoso por escribir historias bastante cortas que recordaban más a la poesía que a la narrativa tradicional, muchas de las cuales tenían una serie de motivos recurrentes con los que Inagaki estaba obsesionado: máquinas voladoras, lámparas de gas, cometas, lunas, Saturno, gatos negros, azul cobalto, bares gay, y adolescentes hermosos. Si todo eso suena inquietamente familiar, es porque la portada del álbum No.0 hace un gran uso de las imágenes del verso de Inagaki, y se podría ver como una especie de ilustración compuesta de la letra de esta canción junto con la letra de "Hikari no Teikoku”, que también trae a la mente mucho de Inagaki. De hecho, las imágenes de la portada de No.0 y del panfleto del tour se parecen mucho a las portadas originales de “Vita Mechanicalis” de Inagaki. También vale la pena el señalar que el título de Inagaki, Vita Mechanicalis, es en sí una referencia a otro trabajo - la autobiografía ficcionalizada de More Ogai , Vita Sexualis. 

Por primera vez, Imai no negó la gran influencia del trabajo de Inagaki en sus letras para este álbum - admitió libremente que estaba evocando el mundo de Inagaki, aunque Imai usó distinto katakana para “Vita Mechanicalis”, quizás por razones de derechos de autor. Dada la inclinación de Imai por la ciencia ficción, no es de dudar que se siente inspirado por Inagaki, aunque también es interesante el notar que Sakurai ha desarrollado un lenguaje similarmente concreto y distintivo de símbolos e imágenes a lo largo de los años, así que la técnica ya ha sido parte del universo creativo de Buck-Tick por harto tiempo.

(1) El Cubismo fue un movimiento de arte de principios del siglo XX, tipificado como representaciones abstractas de figuras y objetos que dan la impresión que se han roto en pedazos o en “cubos”. Pablo Picasso y Georges Braque tuvieron una influencia significante en los movimientos artísticos posteriores, incluyendo algunos favoritos de Imai como el Futurismo, Dadaismo y Constructivismo (las notas de Dada Disco tienen más información sobre esto). En la revista PHY, Imai dijo que ver una exhibición de arte Cubista cuando era un niño fue el momento que definió el desarrollo de su consciente artístico - se dió cuenta de que el arte no tenía que ser apegado a la realidad para tener significado y ser valorado.

El título “Guernica no Yoru” también es una referencia a una pintura de Picasso.

(2) En cada momento que esta frase aparece en la canción, Imai usa un kanji no estándar que significa que “es posible de girar”, en vez que el kanji usual usado por una empresa en funcionamiento. Esto sugiere que él está implicando posibilidades futuras en vez de algo que ocurre aquí y ahora

(3) Metropolis es una película muda distópica lanzada en 1927 en Weimar, Alemania por el director Fritz Lang, basado en una novela de Thea von Harbou (Harbou también contribuyó al diálogo de la película). El filme es uno de los primeros en el género de ciencia ficción distópica, y tuvo una tremenda influencia en el género desde su lanzamiento, particularmente debido a su estética distintiva y bien realizado, al igual que por sus efectos especiales. El director de arte de la película dibujó elementos del Cubismo, Bauhaus, Constructivismo y Art Deco para crear una distopia industrial llena de industrias brutales, rascacielos enormes, y puentes de autopistas llenas de vehículos. La secuencia de apertura de la película consiste en tomas extendidas de las magistrales industrias en operación de una forma bastante similar a la que esta canción evoca con los sonidos al principio. El álbum No.0 por completo contiene elementos que también aparecen en el filme de Fritz Lang - en la película, los poderosos magnates de la industria residen en una masiva estructura conocida como La Nueva Torre de Babel, y la historia de la Torre de Babel sirve como una parábola que canaliza los eventos del tema central de la película (ver notas de “Babel" para más información). Además, el tema central de la película involucra la creación de una mujer robótica horrenda que encanta a los hombres de la ciudad para que cometan crímenes y violenten, con sus bailes, como una especie de Salomé robot futurista. (Ver “Salome”)

Metropolis también es un manga del aclamado Tezuka Osamu, que también escribió Astro Boy (Tetsuwan Atomu - ver “Pinoa Icchio” para más información). El manga Metropolis de Tezuka estuvo un poco influenciado por la película Metropolis de Lang, y es posible que el manga de Tezuka haya sido lo que inspiró a Imai a ver la película. Dados los intereses de Imai, parece casi certero que está familiarizado con ambos trabajos)

(4) Esta es una seguidilla de letras Griegas que (por lo que podemos ver) no significan nada. Las letras Delta y Ksi aparecen en la portada de No.0, en una referencia directa a la letra de esta canción. Si hay un significado mayor detrás de esta secuencia específica de letras, no la hemos encontrado. Pero dada la referencia a los números primarios al final de la canción, parece posible que Imai estuvo buscando por cosas matemáticas, y puede que haya seleccionado estas letras griegas simplemente porque son usadas en ecuaciones matemáticas.

(5) El éter dietílico, comúnmente conocido como “éter” es un solvente orgánico volátil que fue comúnmente usado como un anestésico médico a finales de 1800 y principios de 1900 antes del desarrollo de drogas más seguras y efectivas. El éter también fue usado como una droga recreativa, para lo cual era inhalada o infestada como cocktail, por lo general vertido sobre leche. El éter fue usado como un reemplazo del alcohol, particularmente en Irlanda a finales de 1800, y también en Polonia. Incluso era consumido en combinación con alcohol - el oculista Británico Aleister Crowley era además creador de recetas de cocktails, y algunas de ellas contenían éter. Los usuarios reportan que el éter puedo producir un estupefaciente alucinógeno y una volatilidad transformativa espiritual - pero no se emocionen mucho, porque el consumo de éter también puede causar todo tipo de efectos negativos para la salud, y es extremadamente adictivo.

(6) Este verso es una alusión al trabajo del poeta Francés Comte de Lautréamont, de quien su trabajo oscuro y sarcástico por lo general se ve agrupado con el trabajo de otros de los poetas favoritos de Buck-Tick, Charles Baudelaire (ver “Baudelaire de Nemurenai”) y Arthur Rimbaud (ver “Survival Dance”). Su trabajo, especialmente, es Chants de Maldoror, ha ejercido una fuerte influencia en muchos artistas, especialmente en los Surrealistas - Dali, Breton, Artaud, Duchamp, Man Ray, Ernst, y Tangguy, todos mencionan el haber sido inspirados por Lautréamont.

La palabra que se tradujo como “negro paraguas” literalmente significa “paraguas murciélago” en Japonés. El “paraguas murciélago” fue nombrado de esa forma porque su gran forma negra le daba la apariencia de un murciélago. La palabra usualmente se refiere a los paraguas producidos en masa que vieron la luz en la primera mitad del siglo XX. A Imai claramente le gusta esta imagen porque la ha usado antes, especialmente en la canción “Umbrella”. Aquí, pareciera que está usando la imagen para demostrar su paraíso steampunk de romance con lámparas de gas.

(7) Esta secuencia de números primos es especial no sólo porque 2, 3 ,5 y 7 son todos números primos, sino porque si se suman dan otro número primo (17), y no sólo eso, pero el número 2,357 también lo es. Imai confirmó en la revista PHY que esta propiedad primaria especial fue la razón del por qué escogió estos dígitos en particular.




ノスタルジア -ヰタ メカニカリスー
作詞:今井寿
作曲:今井寿

人には散らぬ言葉を遣い
パンタグラフのスパークを食べ
トワイライトのプラザを キュビズムで歩く
まなざしが視るのは
数光年先のぼくたちの後姿
ダイナモが可動する

ヰタ メカニカリス ヰタ マキナ ディケイド
ヰタ メカニカリス ヰタ マキナ ディケイド

赤色の鉄塊 人口田園風景
セルロイドの人影 黄昏 点滅
通りに響く口笛と 風車のノイズ
誰かが話しかけてきた 廻りには誰もいない
ダイナモが可動する

メトロポリスの眩しい夜に三日月がぶら下がる
ハイウェイランプの集団移動
Δデルタ Ιィオタ Λラムだ Ξクシー
笑い声 気配 エーテルのカクテル
ミシンと蝙蝠傘の出会い
ダイナモが可動する

ヰタ メカニカリス ヰタ マキナ ディケイド
ヰタ メカニカリス ヰタ マキナ ディケイド
ヰタ メカニカリス ヰタ マキナ ディケイド
ヰタ メカニカリス ヰタ マキナ ディケイド

赤色の鉄塊 人口田園風景
セルロイドの人影 黄昏 点滅
通りに響く口笛と 風車のノイズ
誰かが話しかけてきた 廻りには誰もいない

赤色の鉄塊 人口田園風景
セルロイドの人影 黄昏 点滅
通りに響く口笛と 風車のノイズ
誰かが話しかけてきた 廻りには誰もいない
ダイナモが可動する

2  3  5  7     2  3  5  7



Nostalgia -Wita Mechanicalis- 
Lyrics: Imai Hisashi
Music: Imai Hisashi

Hito wa chiranu kotoba wo tsukai
Pantagurafu no supaaku wo tabe
Towairaito no puraza wo     kyubizumu de aruku
Manazashi ga miru no wa
Suukounen saki no boku-tachi no ushiro sugata
Dainamo ga kadou suru

Wita mekanikarisu wita makina dikeido
Wita mekanikarisu wita makina dikeido

Sekishoku no tekkai     jinkou de'en fuukei
Seruroido no hitokage     tasogare     tenmetsu
Toori ni hibiku kuchibue to     fuusha no noize
Dareka ga hanashikaketekita     mawari ni wa dare mo inai
Dainamo ga kadou suru 

Metoroporisu no mabushii yoru ni mikazuki ga burasagaru
Haiuei ranmpu no shuudan idoi
Δ deruta Ι iota Λ ramuda Ξ kushii
Waraigoe     kehai     eetheru no kakuteru
Mishin to koumorigasa no deai
Dainamo ga kadou suru

Wita mekanikarisu wita makina dikeido
Wita mekanikarisu wita makina dikeido
Wita mekanikarisu wita makina dikeido
Wita mekanikarisu wita makina dikeido

Sekishoku no tekkai     jinkou de'en fuukei
Seruroido no hitokage     tasogare     tenmetsu
Toori ni hibiku kuchibue to     fuusha no noize
Dareka ga hanashikaketekita     mawari ni wa dare mo inai
Dainamo ga kadou suru 

Sekishoku no tekkai     jinkou de'en fuukei
Seruroido no hitokage     tasogare     tenmetsu
Toori ni hibiku kuchibue to     fuusha no noize
Dareka ga hanashikaketekita     mawari ni wa dare mo inai
Dainamo ga kadou suru 

2  3  5  7     2  3  5  7