Lyrics‎ > ‎Buck-Tick‎ > ‎

愛の葬列

Album: Atom Miraiha No. 9
2016.09.28 Lingua Sounda/Victor


Funeral Parade of Love
Lyrics: Sakurai Atsushi
Music: Imai Hisashi

Funeral parade of love
Passing on through dark of night
Funeral parade of love
As it carries you away

So far away
Off to somewhere so far away
Saying goodbye
And see you again

I wonder why
I wonder why is it that we cry
Saying goodbye
And see you again

All of your tears
Let them dry
Won't you smile for me?
Off on a journey
Let's go tonight

Funeral parade of love
Passing on through dark of night
Funeral parade of love
As it carries you away
Funeral parade of love
Passing on through dark of night
Funeral parade of love
As it carries me away

I wonder where
I wonder from where does sadness come?1
Saying goodbye
And see you again

It's still early
So won't you turn and look my way?
It's still early
Fall in love
All of your tears
Let them dry
Won't you smile for me?
On your journey
Invite me too2

Funeral parade of love
Passing on through dark of night
Funeral parade of love
As it carries you away
Funeral parade of love
Passing on through dark of night
Funeral parade of love
As it carries me away

Funeral parade of love
Unto the bourn of dark of night3
Funeral parade of love
As it carries you away
Funeral parade of love
Unto the bourn of dark of night
Funeral parade of love
As it carries me away
Funeral parade of love...
Funeral parade of love...
Funeral parade of love...


Note: While "souretsu" technically means "funeral procession," I used the word "parade" instead, for two reasons. First, it fits the syllable count, and for this translation in particular, I wanted the English lyrics to flow naturally and easily with the melody. Second, I see this song in part as a kind of dark inverse of "Love Parade," and more generally of all the celebratory, life-affirming parade imagery Sakurai has used in the past, and I wanted to call attention to that parallel.

1) Technically this line means "I wonder why we're sad," but I took some liberties with the translation in order to fit with the syllable count, and also because I wanted to preserve the retro enka feel of this song even in the English translation and I think that juxtaposing "why" in the first verse with "where" in the second verse better achieves that goal, while also tying into the central question of the song, which is, where exactly do we go when we die?

2) As I see it, this line is the emotional crux of the song - Sakurai has gotten very good and hinging the entire meaning of his lyrics on a single phrase, or in this case, a single word: "izanae." Literally, it does mean, "invite me," but it's also archaic and uncommon, compared to the usual modern reading of the kanji, which is "sasoe." I'm sure Sakurai chose the word in part just because it fits the high, poetic tone of the song.

However, I think it's also worth noting that the word "izanau" is originally derived from ancient Shinto creation myth of Izanami (female) and Izanagi (male), who were basically the Japanese version of Adam and Eve, and gave birth to all the Japanese islands and the kami (nature spirits) of Japan. According to the myth, Izanami was burned to death giving birth to the god of fire, and thus went to dwell in Yomi, the Shinto underworld. Izanagi went down to Yomi to try and bring his wife back, but Izanami said she could no longer return to the world of the living, because she had eaten the food of the dead (this is an eerie parallel to the Greek myth of Persephone). Izanami also warned Izanagi not to look upon her face, but he didn't listen, and lit a torch - only to find that, to his horror, Izanami was now a rotting corpse. Izanagi fled back to the land of the living and shut the gates of Yomi with a boulder, vowing to divorce his wife. Izanami, angry and betrayed, declared that if Izanagi divorced her, she would take the lives of 1000 beings every day. Izanagi declared that if she did that, he would give new life to 1500 beings every day. Thus was death brought into the world, but at the same time, it was ensured that the living would always replace the dead.

So basically, "izanau" carries a lot of hidden baggage, as a word. Whether or not Sakurai was thinking about this on a conscious level when he wrote the song, there's no question that he knows the myth from which the word was derived, because it is as well known to Japanese people as the story of Adam and Eve is to people raised in Abrahamic traditions. And if indeed Sakurai was thinking about Izanami and Izanagi when he wrote the lyrics to this song, the implications are pretty profound - that a world, a pantheon of gods, and death itself could result from one simple invitation.

In modern use, "izanau" also holds a connotation of temptation or seduction. "Sasou" is bog-standard inviting - you could use it for an invitation to a co-worker's birthday party. "Izanau" is much more personal, romantic, and sexual.

3) The original Japanese, "yamiyo no hate," literally means "the last reaches of the dark night," or "the farthest edge of the dark night." I translated "hate" as "bourn" in reference to the famous line from Hamlet's "To be or not to be" soliloquy: "death, the undiscovered country from whose bourn no traveler returns." Given Sakurai's overt reference to the same soliloquy on I Am Mortal, I didn't feel this translation was remotely a stretch.

However, it is interesting to note that the jury is still out on where exactly Shakespeare got the word "bourn" from, and what exactly he meant by it. In Old French, "bourne" means "boundary," which is pretty much a perfect translation for the Japanese "hate." However, in Scottish and Old English, bourn/burn means "river." Since the River Styx is the boundary of the land of the dead in Greco-Roman mythology, arguably, "bourn" could contain both meanings at once, but Shakespeare scholars continue to argue. For more information about Sakurai making Hamlet references, read this article.

P.S. Originally, I didn't plan to write any notes on this song. You can see how well that turned out.




愛の葬列
作詞:櫻井敦司
作曲:今井寿

愛の葬列が 闇夜を逝くよ
愛の葬列が あなたを連れて

遠くへ 何処か遠くへと
さよなら また会おう

何故だろう 何故泣いているんだろう
さよなら また会おう

涙よ 涸れよ 笑っておくれ
今夜は 旅立とう

愛の葬列が 闇夜を逝くよ
愛の葬列が あなたを連れて
愛の葬列が 闇夜を逝くよ
愛の葬列が わたしを連れて

何故だろう 何故悲しいのだろう
さよなら また会おう

まだだよ 俺を見つめておくれ
まだだよ 愛する
涙よ 涸れよ 笑っておくれ
誘え 旅立とう

愛の葬列が 闇夜を逝くよ
愛の葬列が あなたを連れて
愛の葬列が 闇夜を逝くよ
愛の葬列が わたしを連れて

愛の葬列が 闇夜の果てへ 愛の葬列が あなたを連れて
愛の葬列が 闇夜の果てへ 愛の葬列が 私を連れて
愛の葬列が…
愛の葬列が…
愛の葬列が…



Ai no Souretsu
Lyrics: Sakurai Atsushi
Music: Imai Hisashi

Ai no souretsu ga     yamiyo wo yuku yo
Ai no souretsu ga     anata wo tsurete

Tooku e     doko ka tooku e to
Sayonara     mata aou

Naze darou     naze naiteirun darou
Sayonara     mata aou

Namida yo     kare yo     waratte okure
Konya wa     tabidatou

Ai no souretsu ga     yamiyo wo yuku yo
Ai no souretsu ga     anata wo tsurete
Ai no souretsu ga     yamiyo wo yuku yo
Ai no souretsu ga     watashi wo tsurete

Naze darou     naze kanashii no darou
Sayonara     mata aou

Mada da yo     ore wo mitsumete okure
Mada da yo     ai suru
Namida yo     kare yo     waratte okure
Izanae     tabidatou

Ai no souretsu ga     yamiyo wo yuku yo
Ai no souretsu ga     anata wo tsurete
Ai no souretsu ga     yamiyo wo yuku yo
Ai no souretsu ga     watashi wo tsurete

Ai no souretsu ga     yamiyo no hate e     ai no souretsu ga     anata wo tsurete
Ai no souretsu ga     yamiyo no hate e     ai no souretsu ga     watashi wo tsurete
Ai no souretsu ga...
Ai no souretsu ga...
Ai no souretsu ga...