Babesiosis & HIV AIDS

Reports of people testing positve for HIV below.  Some of them actually had Babesiosis and the HIV test was a false-positive.  Additionally, those with HIV and Babesiosis have been shown to relapse making Babesiosis a "chronic" illness.  

Lesson Learned- Both Babesiosis tests and HIV tests can be inaccurate and they can cross react.

More information on Babesiosis- Includes Symptoms, Diagnosis & Treatment


BMJ Case Rep. 2018 Jun 8;2018. pii: bcr-2017-223738. doi: 10.1136/bcr-2017-223738.

Babesiosis as a cause of false-positive HIV serology.

Author information

1
Department of Infectious Diseases, Lehigh Valley Health Network Pocono, East Stroudsburg, Pennsylvania, USA.
2
Medicine, Geisinger Commonwealth School of Medicine, East Stroudsburg, Pennsylvania, USA.

Abstract

This is a case of a 71-year-old homosexual man who presented with a 4-day history of fever, weakness and headaches, near syncope, nausea and poor oral intake. The patient denied recent travel or sick contacts but had significant tick bites in the last 4 weeks. 

A peripheral blood smear showed 0.5% parasitaemia with signet ring appearance organisms consistent with Babesia microti. Serology testing for HIV 1 and 2 by ELISA and western blot were positive. 

Treatment for Babesia was started and the patient improved. Repeat serology testing for HIV was negative. 

To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of false-positive HIV serology that is associated with active babesiosis. In this case, the positive HIV serology turned negative after successful treatment of babesiosis.

KEYWORDS: 

hiv / aids; immunology; infectious diseases; medical education

PMID:
 
29884713
  
DOI:
 
10.1136/bcr-2017-223738




J Med Primatol. 2014 Jun;43(3):206-8. doi: 10.1111/jmp.12105. Epub 2014 Feb 11.

Persistent babesiosis in a Rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) infected with a simian-human immunodeficiency virus.

Author information

1
Division of Comparative Pathology, Tulane National Primate Research Center, Covington, LA, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: 

A rhesus macaque developed chronic anemia, lymphocytic leukocytopenia, fever, and anorexia while immunodeficient following inoculation with a simian-human immunodeficiency virus.

METHODS: 

A complete blood count, peripheral blood smear, polymerase chain reaction and gene sequence were performed.

RESULTS: 

Blood smears demonstrated persistent intraerythrocytic piroplasms with rare Maltese cross forms. Babesia microti-like protozoa were confirmed by polymerase chain reaction and sequencing of the 18S ribosomal RNA gene.

CONCLUSION: 

With continued use of non-human primates as models for human diseases, infection and complications from babesiosis should be monitored.

© 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

KEYWORDS: 

Babesia microti-like; non-human primate; simian-human immunodeficiency virus

PMID:
 
24517274
 
PMCID:
 
PMC3989376
 
DOI:
 
10.1111/jmp.12105
[Indexed for MEDLINE] 
Free PMC Article

Link Here



J Clin Apher. 1993;8(2):78-81.

Treatment of babesiosis by red blood cell exchange in an HIV-positive, splenectomized patient.

Author information

1
Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA 90048.

Abstract

Babesiosis is a malaria-like parasitic disease causing subclinical or mild illness in most cases. Splenectomized patients, however, may experience a more severe course. Although generally responsive to antibiotic therapy, several cases of severe babesiosis refractory to appropriate antibiotic therapy have been reported to respond promptly and dramatically to red blood cell (RBC) exchange transfusion.

 Although the role of HIV coinfection in babesiosis is uncertain, two previously reported cases raise a concern that it may predispose to a more severe clinical course. We report a third case of severe babesiosis in an HIV-positive splenectomized man, following travel to an endemic area. 

Antibiotic therapy, though initially effective, ultimately failed to prevent severe disease. RBC exchange transfusion resulted in prompt clinical improvement, which has been sustained during 26 months of follow-up. 

Although the patient has since developed various sequelae of HIV infection, including disseminated Kaposi's sarcoma, CMV retinitis, and enteritis, there has been no recurrence of observable parasitemia. 

In severe babesiosis, RBC exchange transfusion, combined with appropriate antibiotic therapy, appears to be a rapidly effective therapeutic modality which can induce sustained remissions.

PMID:
 
8226709
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Link Here



Clin Infect Dis. 1996 May;22(5):809-12.

Babesiosis in patients with AIDS: a chronic infection presenting as fever of unknown origin.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine, New England Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts 02111, USA.

Abstract

Babesiosis is a malaria-like, tick-transmitted zoonosis caused by protozoa of the family Piroplasmorida, which includes Babesia and Theileria species. In the United States, the infection is endemic in the Northeast and upper Midwest, although cases have recently been described in Northern California and Washington State. 

We report a case of babesiosis in a patient infected with HIV who presented with a prolonged fever of unknown origin; the patient had not undergone splenectomy. Parasitemia persisted despite initial clinical improvement after treatment with quinine and clindamycin. 

Babesiosis was controlled with a maintenance regimen consisting of clindamycin, doxycycline, and high-dose azithromycin, but the infection was not eradicated. Babesiosis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of HIV-infected patients with fevers and/or anemia in areas where the infection is endemic. 

HIV-infected patients who are severely immunosuppressed, even those without a history of splenectomy, may present with severe manifestations of babesiosis and develop a chronic infection, which may require therapy to prevent relapse of disease.

PMID:
 
8722936
[Indexed for MEDLINE] 

FULL ARTICLE BELOW
 
Link To Full Article- Pay Per View



Ann Intern Med. 1987 Dec;107(6):944.

Babesiosis and infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)

PMID:
 
3688692
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
FULL article- pay per view- here

http://annals.org/aim/article-abstract/702361/babesiosis-infection-human-immunodeficiency-virus-hiv?volume=107&issue=6&page=944



ADDITIONAL ARTICLES

Babesiosis as a cause of false-positive HIV serology.

Smotrys M, Magge T, Alkhuja S, Gandotra SD.

BMJ Case Rep. 2018 Jun 8;2018. pii: bcr-2017-223738. doi: 10.1136/bcr-2017-223738.

PMID:
 
29884713

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Select item 28801382

False Positive HIV Result and Low CD4 in Babesiosis.

Mesiha N, Whitman M, Goldsmith D, Vypritskaya E, Hasan S.

Ann Clin Lab Sci. 2017 Aug;47(4):516-517. No abstract available. 

PMID:
 
28801382

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González LM, Castro E, Lobo CA, Richart A, Ramiro R, González-Camacho F, Luque D, Velasco AC, Montero E.

Int J Infect Dis. 2015 Apr;33:202-4. doi: 10.1016/j.ijid.2015.02.005. Epub 2015 Feb 14.

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Babesiosis and HIV.

Froberg MK, Dannen D, Bakken JS.

Lancet. 2004 Feb 28;363(9410):704. No abstract available. 

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15001329

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