Louisiana High School Football Scores

    football scores
  • (football score) the score in a football game
    high school
  • A school that typically comprises grades 9 through 12, attended after primary school or middle school
  • High school is used in some parts of the world, particularly in Scotland, North America and Oceania to describe an institution that provides all or part of secondary education. The term "high school" originated in Scotland with the world's oldest being the Royal High School (Edinburgh) in 1505.
  • High School is a 2010 comedy film starring Academy Award-winner Adrien Brody. It is the feature length directorial debut of John Stalberg, Jr. The film premiered at the Sundance Film Festival in January 2010 and will be distributed in theatres internationally by Parallel Media.
  • senior high school: a public secondary school usually including grades 9 through 12; "he goes to the neighborhood highschool"
    louisiana
  • a state in southern United States on the Gulf of Mexico; one of the Confederate states during the American Civil War
  • A state in the southern US, on the Gulf of Mexico; pop. 4,468,976; capital, Baton Rouge; statehood, Apr. 30, 1812 (18). It was sold by the French to the US as part of the Louisiana Purchase in 1803
  • Louisiana (or ; Etat de Louisiane, ; Louisiana Creole: Leta de la Lwizyan) is a state located in the southern region of the United States of America. Its capital is Baton Rouge and largest city is New Orleans. Louisiana is the only state in the U.S.
  • Louisiana is a city in Pike County, Missouri, United States. The population was 3,863 at the 2000 census. Louisiana is located in northeast Missouri, on the Mississippi River south of Hannibal.
louisiana high school football scores
louisiana high school football scores - Weird Louisiana:
Weird Louisiana: Your Travel Guide to Louisiana's Local Legends and Best Kept Secrets
Weird Louisiana: Your Travel Guide to Louisiana's Local Legends and Best Kept Secrets
?Best Travel Series of The Year 2006” ?Booklist
Your travel guide to the land of voodoo, hoodoo, and backwater bayous! Just hearing the name ?Louisiana” is enough to conjure up all sorts of strange visions in one’s imagination: haunted Old South plantations, French Quarter mansions, and white marble and limestone towers that house the dead. And, of course, there’s Mardi Gras, the most surreal and extravagant celebration in the country. Author Roger Manley (who caught a ?swamp monster” in the bayous behind his family’s home) knows and reveals everything about this state of the weird, wacky, and wonderful.


Tiger Stadium, aka Death Valley, Louisiana State University (LSU), Baton Rouge, Louisiana (2)
Tiger Stadium, aka Death Valley, Louisiana State University (LSU), Baton Rouge, Louisiana (2)
Tiger Stadium or Death Valley is the home field of Louisiana State University American football team. With a seating capacity of 92,400, it is the ninth largest stadium in the NCAA and third largest stadium in the SEC after Tennessee's Neyland Stadium and Georgia's Sanford Stadium. In terms of general population, Tiger Stadium would be the sixth-largest city in Louisiana for the seven home games each year. Tiger Stadium is commonly referred to as "Death Valley," due to its high level of cheering during games. The original nickname of "deaf valley" was applied to the stadium (distinguishing it from Clemson University's Memorial Stadium), but over the years was misunderstood for "death valley." During a nationally televised game against Auburn in 2003, ESPN recorded a noise level of 119 decibels at certain points in the game. During the October 6, 2007 game against the University of Florida, CBS recorded 130 decibels, thus making it the second loudest collegiate stadium in the country, behind Husky Stadium in Seattle, Washington. The standard cheer among Tigers fans is "GEAUX TIGERS!" (pronounced "Go")--the spelling of "geaux" reflecting Louisiana's French roots. Fans also commonly taunt opposing players and fans by yelling "Tiger bait!" while waving and pointing their fingers at them in the same manner as Florida State University's "tomahawk chop". Despite being 14–2 at Tiger Stadium, famed Alabama head coach Bear Bryant once remarked that "Baton Rouge happens to be the worst place in the world for a visiting team. It's like being inside a drum."[1] In 2001, ESPN sideline reporter Adrian Karsten said, "Death Valley in Baton Rouge is the loudest stadium I've ever been in."[2] In 2002, Miami (Ohio) coach Terry Hoeppner said of Tiger Stadium, "That's as exciting an environment as you can have ... we had communication problems we haven't had at Michigan and Ohio State."[2] In 2003, ESPN's Chris Fowler called LSU his favorite game day experience.[2] In 2009 Former Arkansas governor Mike Huckabee stated "Unfair is playing LSU on a Saturday night in Baton Rouge." on Fox news with Sean Hannity. Survey after survey has concluded that Tiger Stadium is the most difficult place for a visiting team to play, including surveys by the College Football Association in 1987, The Sporting News in 1989, Gannett News Service in 1995, and Sport Magazine in 1998.[2] More recently, in 2007, ESPN named Tiger Stadium "the scariest place to play," saying that "Tiger Stadium is, by far, the loudest stadium in the country."[3] In 2009, ESPN writer Chris Low listed Tiger Stadium's Saturday night atmosphere as unsurpassed in the country, ranking it No. 1 out of the conference's 12 stadiums. Tiger Stadium was the site of the legendary "Earthquake Game" against Auburn in 1988. LSU won the game, 7-6, when quarterback Tommy Hodson completed a game-winning touchdown pass to running back Eddie Fuller in the waning seconds of the game. The crowd reaction registered as a legitimate earthquake on the seismograph in the Louisiana Geological Survey office on campus.[7] Other famous moments: The Billy Cannon touchdown run on Halloween night in 1959 when #1-ranked LSU scored late in the game to win against #3 Ole Miss by a score of 7-3[8]; The last-second Bert Jones touchdown pass in 1972 against Ole Miss. LSU was down 16–10 with four seconds left in the game when Jones made an incomplete pass. At the end of the play, fans looked at the clock which surprisingly showed one second remaining. LSU used the last second of the game for a touchdown pass from Bert Jones to Brad Davis. According to Ole Miss lore, a sign was put up at the Louisiana–Mississippi border reading "You are now entering Louisiana. Set your clocks back four seconds."[9]; and On October 11, 1997, #14 LSU upset #1 Florida with a 28–21 victory[10]. Tiger Stadium first opened its gates to fans in the fall of 1924 as LSU hosted Tulane in the season finale. Since the first game in Tiger Stadium, LSU has gone on to post a 354-138-18 (.716) mark in Death Valley.[2] Moreover, Tiger Stadium is also known for night games, an idea that was first introduced in 1931 against Spring Hill (a 35-0 LSU victory). In 2006, LSU celebrated its 75th year of playing night football in Tiger Stadium. LSU has played the majority of its games at night and the Tigers have fared much better under the lights than during the day. Since 1960, LSU is 201–59–3 (.773) at night in Tiger Stadium compared to a 20–22–3 (.476) record during the day over that span.[2] Currently, LSU has not lost a Saturday night game in Death Valley since the 2002 season. Unlike most football fields, where only the yard lines ending in "0" are marked, Tiger Stadium also marks the yard lines ending in "5". LSU's Tiger Stadium uniquely sports "H" s
Wounded Warriors
Wounded Warriors
Wounded Warrior Amputee Softball Team Soldiers Saul Bosquez and Cpl. Matt Kinsey practice Feb. 24 at Space Coast Stadium in Viera, Fla., spring training home of the Washington Nationals. U.S. Army photo by Tim Hipps, IMCOM Public Affairs Wounded Warrior Amputee Softball Team feels like ‘America’s Team’ By Tim Hipps IMCOM Public Affairs VIERA, Fla. – Army Cpl. Matt Kinsey says he plays for the newest version of “America’s Team” – the Wounded Warrior Amputee Softball Team. “We’ve got the best fans of any team in America,” Kinsey said Feb. 24 after practicing at Space Coast Stadium, spring training home of the Washington Nationals. “Everybody says we’re America’s new favorite team. The support that we get is just unbelievable – everywhere we go, we get first-class treatment.” All of the players are Soldiers or Marines who lost limbs while deployed to Iraq or Afghanistan. They are the first softball squadron completely assembled with wounded warriors playing on prosthetics or with missing body parts. They plan to play 60 to 75 games this year against able-bodied teams, and they expect to win most of those contests. For these guys, however, every day spent on a diamond is a win-win situation. “The fans thank you for your service and everything, but they are kind of in awe because they are not used to seeing – it’s the first time it’s ever been done: guys playing competitive softball on prosthetics,” Kinsey said. “I think they look at us walking in like, “Ah, I don’t know if these guys are really going to be up to snuff.’ “But they find out pretty quick that we can play. As soon as the game is over, I think they are just in awe of how hard we play and the talent level we’re at. We get a really good reception.” The team is the brainchild of David Van Sleet, 56, a former Army specialist who spent the past 32 years working with prosthetics for the Department of Veterans Affairs. “I’ve been involved with softball my whole life, managing, coaching and playing,” Van Sleet said. “I just stopped to do this. I’m the brainchild, the founder and head coach. “I saw some pretty athletic looking guys coming back from Iraq and Afghanistan,” he explained. “And the University of Arizona acquired a Congressional grant that enabled us to bring 20 guys to Tucson in 2011 for a disabled veterans sports camp. I came up with the idea to make it a softball camp. “When we were there, the camaraderie and the skill level that I saw, I was like, ‘Man, we’ve got something here.’ More importantly, the guys told me that we had something there, and they didn’t want it to end. We took it from there, and it’s just exploded.” The team carries13 to 15 players on the roster and takes 11 on each road trip to play against military teams, firemen, policemen, celebrity squads, elite women’s teams and all-comers. They will face a D.C. celebrity team following the Boston Red Sox-Washington Nationals game April 3 at Nationals Park in Washington. They have a game set for Doubleday Field in Cooperstown, N.Y., home of the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. More extravaganzas are set for Huntsville, Ala., and The Hamptons on Long Island, N.Y. Olympic softball star Jennie Finch has invited them to Louisiana for a “ Battle on the Bayou.” And they will play before the NCAA Women’s Softball Championship finale in Oklahoma City. Kinsey, 26, played baseball for Rockville High School in Indiana and a year of junior college ball for Danville Area Community College in Illinois. He experienced arm problems there and returned home to work on the farm for a couple of years before joining the Army in March of 2006. “I was on my second tour of Afghanistan when I stepped on a land mine on a night patrol and I lost my right foot,” Kinsey recalled of June 2, 2010, the day his life forever changed. “Half of it was missing initially. The explosion blew away from me, so I was very fortunate that happened. When I got to Walter Reed [Army Medical Center], we decided to take the rest of the foot. Now I have a nub. “I had a very quick recovery. I was running by August.” Running again, however, was a learning process. “It’s different at first. I’m not going to lie,” said Kinsey, who shifted his pitching and catching baseball prowess to shortstop for softball. “You basically retrain yourself on how to play and how to move. But as far as getting up and going and planting, I probably have more of an advantage because I create more torque. I have more leg than a lot of the guys.” Saul Bosquez played high school, American Legion and two seasons of junior college baseball at Grand Rapids Community College before joining the Army. He soon deployed as a specialist from Fort Benning, Ga., to Iraq. On Aug. 1, 2007, Bosquez had completed a convoy of Iraqi police checkpoints and was returning to base when his vehicle encountered an improvised explosive device that broke his left leg in 11 places and collected two of his right toes. Eventually, he became a below the k
louisiana high school football scores