Long Beach Theatres




Exploring Long Beach Theatres

On my drives around downtown Long Beach, I'm always delighted
 to see so many wonderful buildings left. Especially art deco treasures
 from the city's great building boom following the 1933 earthquake.

Sadly, there's not much left from the great stock of theatres
that once thrived in Long Beach. Changes in the theatre business
 and urban renewal spurred by the declining fortunes of the
downtown area finished almost all of them.

  The Art Theatre, a cute deco style neighborhood house dating
 from 1924 is the only historic Long Beach theatre still running films.
 Looking at other Long Beach treasures requires a bit of time travel.

Some of the theatres were well documented, some not. If you
have any photos of Long Beach Theatres in the attic or have
additional information or corrections, please let me know.


Thanks for visiting!

-- Bill Counter


    Long Beach History Resources    


The City of Long Beach Planning Department
has a page on historic landmarks.

Bob Compere has a small set of earthquake
photos on Flickr that were taken by his grandfather.

For more information on Long Beach Theatres a great
resource is the Cinema Treasures list. Also pay a visit
to the Long Beach section of the Cinema Tour directory.

California State University Long Beach has a big
web section from
RGRLL, the University's department of
Romance, German, Russian Languages and Literature,

devoted to early Long Beach Theatres and silent
film production in Long Beach.


A 1920 looking north from the pier up Pine St. The
posters are advertising various Long Beach stage productions. 
The photo is on the CSULB page
"Early Long Beach Theatres."


A map of early downtown Long Beach theatre locations

appearing on the CSULB page "Early Long Beach Theatres." 
The map is by Ronald W. Mahan. The page also has a
list of theatre addresses and dates.

full size view


Also of interest on the CSULB
Early Long Beach section:

"Burgeoning 'Hollywood,' The Pike and Theatre by the Sea |
| Columbia/Strand Theatre - 1910  Hoyt's Pantages  |
Liberty/Roxy Theatre  |
Balboa Studio Research Archives - home page  |
Long Beach - Hollywood By The Sea  |
California Motion Picture Manufacturing - 1910-1913 |
| Balboa Studio MilestonesUnfinished Story of Balboa Studios  |
Balboa Features Long Beach Studios - 1918-1922  |
Articles  |  Balboa mysteries  |
... and many of the pages have
links to additional documents


The Historical Society of Long Beach has a website detailing
their activities and collections. Also see the HSLB Facebook page.

 The Island of Long Beach Facebook page
has hundreds of photos from a variety of sources.

The book "Long Beach Art Deco" by Arcadia
Publishing has many great photos.

Long Beach, Calif. is a nice photo set on Facebook.

Visit the Long Beach Heritage Museum online.

The Long Beach Public Library has both an online
photo collection as well as digitized city directories.

Note that more than one city directory company
covered early Long Beach, sometimes resulting in several
different sets of information from different libraries.

See Militant Angeleno for an interesting
tour of 7 Long Beach Buildings.

The Odd Duck website has a nice spread that includes
photos of a number of "Art Deco Theaters of Long Beach."

Penny Postcards from California has a great assortment of
vintage postcards showing the aftermath of the 1933 earthquake.
Also see the site's main Long Beach section.

 The Pike is a wonderful website with many historic photos.

The Port of Long Beach has early photos on their POLB 100 website
and their blog celebrating the Port of Long Beach Centennial.

On Vintage Los Angeles: a 1933 beach aerial view.

A Visit To Old Los Angeles has a colorful walk curated by
Brent Dickerson: "Long Beach: Pier and Pike." 

Wikipedia has an article on The Pike.

On You Tube:  "History of Long Beach" and  "Long Beach Pike" .

See some more links about the history of The Pike (as well
as several photos) down at the bottom of this column.





    Long Beach Theatres Street by Street    


    1st St.   


Coughran Opera House
112 E. 1st St.
[ demolished  ]


    2nd St.   


  Fox Belmont
 4918 E. 2nd St., Belmont Shore


    3rd St.   


 Tabernacle
ne corner of Locust Ave. and 3rd St.
[ demolished ]

  Ebell Theatre
 1100 E. 3rd St.
[ converted to lofts ]


    4th St.   


  Egyptian Theatre
 242 E. 4th St.
[ demolished ]

  Art Theatre
 2025 E. 4th St.
[ first run art films ]


    American Ave.    


It got renamed Long
Beach Blvd. around 1960
-- see those listings


    Anaheim St.    


  Home Theatre
 1625 E. Anaheim St.
[ demolished ]


  Hart Theatre
 1901 E. Anaheim St.
[ demolished ]


  Cabart Theatre
 2342 E. Anaheim St.
[ remodeled - community center ]


  Dale Theatre
 2933 E. Anaheim St.
[ demolished ]



    Atlantic Ave.    


  Atlantic Theatre
 5870 Atlantic Ave.
[ demolished ]

  Front Door Theatre
 5832 Atlantic Ave.
[ demolished ]


  Towne Theatre
 4425 Atlantic Ave.
[ demolished ]

  Crest Theatre
 4275 Atlantic Ave.
[ demolished ]


  Brayton Theatre
 2157 Atlantic Ave.
[ demolished ]




    Bellflower Blvd.   


Los Altos Drive In
2800 N. Bellflower Blvd.
[ demolished ]



    Belmont Shore   

  Fox Belmont
 4918 E. 2nd St.
[ retail / health club ]



    Board Walk   


Theatorium

35 Board Walk
[ demolished ]




    Broadway   


Edison Theatre

213 E. Broadway
[ vacant ]




    Carson St.   


Lakewood Drive In
2100 Carson St. -- at Cherry
[ demolished ]

Lakewood Theatre
4501 E. Carson St.
[ demolished ]

Edwards Long Beach Stadium 26
7501 E. Carson St.
[ open ]



    Locust Ave.   


 Tabernacle
ne corner of Locust Ave. and 3rd St.
[ demolished ]

 Long Beach Theatre 

foot of Locust Ave. -- at Seaside?
[ demolished ]



    Long Beach Blvd.    

[ formerly American Ave. ]

LaShell Theatre
  5384 Long Beach Blvd.
[ warehouse ]

California Theatre

  1049 Long Beach Blvd.
[ demolished ]

Rivoli Theatre
  525 Long Beach Blvd.
[ demolished ]

  Egyptian Theatre
 4th & Long Beach Blvd.
[ demolished ]

Mission / Fox Long Beach
32 Long Beach Blvd.
[ demolished ]



    along Ocean Blvd.   

you're going farther east
 as you scroll down

<  beach side  |  north side  >



<<  Chestnut Pl. >>

<< 1 block south
Boston Theatre
344 The Pike
[ demolished ]

<< 1 block south
Byde-A-Wyle / Unique
336 The Pike
[ demolished ]

<< 1 block south
Joyland Theatre
335 - 341 The Pike
[ demolished ]

<< 1 block south
Bijou Theatre
333 The Pike
[ demolished ]

<< 1 block south
Wonderland/Lyric/Gayety/Pickwick
330 The Pike
[ demolished ]
Biona Court
<< 1 block south
Bentley / Hart / Hip
317-319 The Pike
[ demolished ]

<<
1 block south
Art Theatre
314 The Pike
[ demolished ]

<< 1 block south
Tarrytown Theatre
300 block (?) on The Pike
[ demolished ]

<< 1 block south
Palace of Pictures 
300 block (?) on The Pike
[ demolished ]

<< 1 block south
Pastime Theatre
311 The Pike
[ demolished ]
<<  Cedar Walk

<< 1 block south
Columbia/Hoyt's/Strand
235 The Pike
[ demolished ]



<<  The Pike |  Pacific Ave.  >>

Roxy Theatre

127 W. Ocean Blvd.
[ demolished ]

<<
1 block south
Rialto Theatre
117 The Pike
[ demolished ]

<< 1/2 block south
Theatorium
35 Board Walk
[ demolished ]
2 1/2 blocks north >>
AMC Pine Square 16
 245 Pine Ave.
[ gutted ]
<< 2 blocks south
Cinemark 14 at The Pike
99 S. Pine Ave.
[ first run films ]
4 blocks north >>
Laughlin Theatre
347 Pine Ave.
[ demolished ]


<<  Pine Ave.  >>
<< 1 block south
Municipal Auditorium - 1905
S. Pine Ave. & Seaside Way
[ demolished ]
1/2 block north >>
Palace Theatre
30 Pine Ave.
[ demolished ]

1 block north >>
Coughran Opera House
112 E. 1st St.
[ demolished  ]

State Theatre
104 E. Ocean Blvd.
[ demolished ]

<< 1 block south
American Theatre
115 - 145 E. Seaside Way
[ demolished ]

<< 1 block south
 Long Beach Theatre 
foot of Locust Ave. at Seaside?
[ demolished ]

<<  Locust Ave.  |  Promenade   >>
<< 1 block south
Terrace Theatre - 1978
200 E. Seaside Way
[ legit attractions, concerts ]
Long Beach
Convention Center

<< 1 block south
Victor Theatre
207 E. Seaside Way
[ demolished ]
United Artists
217 E. Ocean Blvd.
[ demolished ]
Waite Ct.   >>
<< 1 block south
Capitol / Tracy Theatre
 219 E. Seaside Way
[ demolished ]

<< 1 block south
Fairyland Theatre
225 E. Seaside Way
[ demolished ]


<<  Collins Way


Municipal Auditorium - 1932
300 E. Ocean Blvd.
[ demolished ]
Long Beach Blvd.  >>
[ formerly American Ave. ]

1/2 block north >>
Mission / Fox Long Beach
32 Long Beach Blvd.
[ demolished ]


<<  Hart Place

Imperial Theatre
319 E. Ocean Blvd.
[ demolished ]

West Coast Theatre
333 E. Ocean Blvd.
[ demolished ]

The Movie
345 E. Ocean Blvd.
[ demolished ]


<<  Elm Ave.  >>



[ end of Ocean Blvd. listings ]



    Pacific Coast Highway   


AMC Marina Pacifica 12
 6346 E. Pacific Coast Highway
[ first run films ]

  Circle Drive In
 1633 Ximeno Ave. @ PCH
[ demolished ]


UA Long Beach Marketplace 6

 6601 E. Pacific Coast Highway
[ first run films ]



    Pike Ave.   


you're going farther east
 as you scroll down

<  beach side  |  north side  >

<<  Chestnut Pl. >>

Boston Theatre
344 The Pike
[ demolished ]

Byde-A-Wyle / Unique 
336 The Pike
[ demolished ]
Joyland Theatre
335 - 341 The Pike
[ demolished ]

Bijou Theatre
333 The Pike
[ demolished ]
Wonderland / Lyric / Gayety
330 The Pike
[ demolished ]
<< Biona Court >>

Bentley / Hart / Hip
317-319 The Pike
[ demolished ]
Art Theatre
314 The Pike
[ demolished ]

Tarrytown Theatre
300 block (313?) on The Pike
[ demolished ]

Palace of Pictures 
300 block (?) on The Pike
[ demolished ]

Pastime Theatre
311 The
Pike
[ demolished ]


<<  Cedar Walk  >>



 Strand Theatre
 235 The Pike
 [ demolished ]







Rialto Theatre
117 The Pike

[ demolished ]

 Board Walk  >>




    Pine Ave.   


Laughlin Theatre
347 Pine Ave.
[ demolished ]

AMC Pine Square 16

 245 Pine Ave.
[ gutted ]

  La Petite Theatre
 236 Pine Ave.
[ demolished ]

Coughran Opera House
112 E. 1st St., east of Pine
[ demolished  ]

  Palace Theatre
 30 Pine Ave.
[ demolished ]

Municipal Auditorium - 1905
  S. Pine Ave. & Seaside Way
[ demolished ]

  Cinemark 14 at The Pike
  99 S. Pine Ave.
[ first run films ]



    Queens Highway   


  Queen Mary
 1126 Queens Highway
[ hotel, events, banquets ]



    Redondo Ave.   


Redondo Theatre
  1216 Redondo Ave.
[ demolished ]

Ritz Theatre
  681 Redondo Ave.
[ demolished ]



    Santa Fe Ave.   


Long Beach Drive In
  Santa Fe Ave. at 223rd St.
[ demolished ]

Santa Fe Theatre
2170 Santa Fe Ave.
[ demolished ]




    Seaside Way   


Municipal Auditorium
- 1905
  S. Pine Ave. & Seaside Way
[ demolished ]

American Theatre
115 - 145 E. Seaside Way
[ demolished ]

 Long Beach Theatre 
foot of Locust Ave. -- at Seaside?
[ demolished ]

Terrace Theatre - 1978
200 E. Seaside Way
[ legit attractions, concerts ]

Wigwam / Victor Theatre
 207 E. Seaside Way
[ demolished ]

Ritz / Capitol / Tracy Theatre

 219 E. Seaside Way
[ demolished ]

Fairyland Theatre
 225 E. Seaside Way
[ demolished ]


    Spring St.    


  Plaza Theatre
 6337 E. Spring St.
[ retail and restaurant ]




    Viking Way    


  Triangle Cinema
 4129 Viking Way
[ remodeled - sports bar ]




    Ximeno Ave.    


  Circle Drive In
 1633 Ximeno Ave.
[ demolished ]



    address not known    


The Lyceum







    Alternate Name Directory    


AMC Marina Pacifica 6 6346 E. Pacific Coast Hwy.
-- see AMC Marina Pacifica 12 

AMC Marina Pacifica 12   6346 E. Pacific Coast Highway

AMC Pine Square 16    245 Pine Ave.

American Theatre
  115 - 145 E. Seaside Way

Arrowhead Theatre  335 - 341 The Pike  see Joyland Theatre  

Art Theatre   2025 E. 4th St.

Art Theatre  314 -316 W. Pike Ave.

Atlantic Theatre    5870 Atlantic Ave.

Belmont Theatre  4918 E. 2nd St., Belmont Shore -- see Fox Belmont

Bentley Theatre  317-319 W. Pike Ave.

Bentley Empress
  317-319 W. Pike Ave. -- see Bentley Theatre 

Bentley Grand
  317-319 W. Pike Ave. -- see Bentley Theatre 

Bijou Theatre  
333 The Pike

Boston Theatre   344 The Pike

Brayton Theatre   2157 Atlantic Ave.

Byde-A-Wyle Theatre   336 The Pike

Cabart Theatre   2342 E. Anaheim St.

California Theatre  1049 American Ave. ( now Long Beach Blvd.)

Carter Theatre  2025 E. 4th St. -- see the Art Theatre

Capitol Theatre  219 E. Seaside Way -- see the Tracy Theatre

Chautauqua Assembly of Long Beach  ne corner of Locust Ave. and 3rd St.
see Tabernacle 

Cheroske's Egyptian Theatre   242 E. 4th St. see  Egyptian Theatre 

Cinemark 14 at The Pike
  99 S. Pine Ave.

Circle Drive In  1633 Ximeno Ave. @ Pacific Coast Highway

Columbia Theatre  235 W. Pike Ave. -- see the  Strand Theatre

Coronet Theatre   4129 Viking Way  -- see the Triangle Cinema  

Coughlin Opera House
  112 E. 1st St.  -- see Coughran Opera House

Coughran Opera House 
112 E. 1st St.

Crest Theatre   4275 Atlantic Ave.

Dale Theatre  2933 E. Anaheim St.

Ebell Theatre  1100 E. 3rd St.

Edison Theatre    213 E. Broadway

Edwards Long Beach Stadium 26  7501 E. Carson St.

Egyptian Theatre  242 E. 4th St.

Empire Theatre  32 Long Beach Blvd. (American Way) -- see Fox Long Beach

Empress  317-319 W. Pike Ave. -- see Bentley Theatre 

Fahey's Palace  30 Pine Ave. -- see Palace Theatre  

Fahey's State  104 E. Ocean Blvd. -- see State Theatre

Fahey's Theatorium  35 Board Walk -- see Theatorium  

Fairyland Theatre   225 E. Seaside Way

Family Theatre  115 - 145 - 149 E. Seaside Way see American Theatre 

Fox Belmont  4918 E. 2nd St., Belmont Shore

Fox Egyptian   242 E. 4th St.  -- see  Egyptian Theatre 

Fox Imperial  319 E. Ocean Blvd. -- see Imperial Theatre  

Fox Long Beach   32 Long Beach Blvd.

Fox West Coast  233 E. Ocean Blvd. -- see West Coast Theatre

Front Door Theatre 
5832 Atlantic Ave.

Gayety Theatre
  330 The Pike

Grand Theatre  317-319 W. Pike Ave. -- see Bentley Theatre 

Hart Theatre
  317-319 W. Pike Ave. -- see Bentley Theatre 

Hart Theatre  1901 E. Anaheim St.

Hip Theatre  317-319 W. Pike Ave. -- see Bentley Theatre 

Home Theatre 
1625 E. Anaheim St.

Hoyt's Theatre  235 W. Pike Ave. -- see the  Strand Theatre

Hoyt's Ebell Theatre 
1100 E. 3rd St. -- see Ebell Theatre

Hoyt's Pantages  235 W. Pike Ave. -- see the  Strand Theatre

Hoyt's Vaudeville Theatre  235 W. Pike Ave. -- see the  Strand Theatre

Imperial Theatre  
319 E. Ocean Blvd.

Joyland Theatre   335 - 341 The Pike

Lakewood Theatre   4501 E. Carson St.

Lakewood Drive In  2100 Carson St. -- at Cherry, Long Beach

La Petite Theatre  236 Pine Ave.

LaShell Theatre   5384 Long Beach Blvd.

Laughlin Theatre  347 Pine Ave.

Lee Theatre 
2025 E. 4th St. -- see the Art Theatre

Liberty Theatre  127 W. Ocean Blvd. -- see  Roxy Theatre  

Loew's State  104 E. Ocean Blvd. -- see State Theatre

Long Beach Theatre  32 Long Beach Blvd. (American Way)
-- see
Fox Long Beach

Long Beach Theatre   336 The Pike  see Byde-A-Wyle Theatre

Long Beach Theatre  foot of Locust Ave.

Long Beach, Mitchell Bros.  217 E. Ocean Blvd. -- see the United Artists

Long Beach Big Screen 5870 Atlantic Ave. -- see Atlantic Theatre   

Long Beach Drive In   Santa Fe Ave. at 223rd St.

Long Beach Marketplace 6
6601 E. Pacific Coast Hwy.
-- see UA Long Beach Marketplace 6 

Long Beach Stadium 26
   7501 E. Carson St.

Los Altos Drive In
  2800 N. Bellflower Blvd.

Lyceum, The  address not known

Lyric Theatre  330 The Pike -- see Gayety Theatre 

Major Theatre  32 Long Beach Blvd. (American Way) -- see Fox Long Beach

Marina Pacifica 6 6346 E. Pacific Coast Highway
-- see AMC Marina Pacifica 12 

Marina Pacifica 12   6346 E. Pacific Coast Highway

Markwell Theatre  104 E. Ocean Blvd. -- see State Theatre

Metro Ebell Theatre  1100 E. 3rd St. -- see Ebell Theatre
 
Mission Theatre  32 Long Beach Blvd. (American Way) -- see Fox Long Beach

Mitchell Bros.  217 E. Ocean Blvd. -- see the United Artists

Movie, The  345 E. Ocean Blvd.

Municipal Auditorium  (1905)   S. Pine Ave. & Seaside Way

Municipal Auditorium  (1932)   300 E. Ocean Blvd.

Murray's Theatre 5384 Long Beach Blvd. -- see LaShell Theatre  

Murray's Oriental Theatre 5384 Long Beach Blvd. -- see LaShell Theatre  

National Theatorium  35 Board Walk -- see Theatorium

New Dale Theatre 
2933 E. Anaheim St.  -- see Dale Theatre

Newsreel Theatre  30 Pine Ave. -- see Palace Theatre  

New Strand Theatre  235 W. Pike Ave. -- see the Strand Theatre

New Tracy Theatre 
219 E. Seaside Way -- see the Tracy Theatre

News Palace  30 Pine Ave. -- see Palace Theatre  

Oriental Theatre 5384 Long Beach Blvd. -- see LaShell Theatre  

Pacific Terrace Theatre  (1978)   200 E. Seaside Way

Palace of Pictures  300 block (?) on The Pike

Palace Theatre  
30 Pine Ave.

Pantages, Hoyt's  235 W. Pike Ave. -- see the  Strand Theatre

Paradise Theatre   4129 Viking Way  -- see the Triangle Cinema  

Pastime Theatre  311 W. Pike Ave.

Pickwick Theatre  330 The Pike -- see Gayety Theatre 

Pike Theatre  207 E. Seaside Way  -- see the Victor Theatre 

Pike, The 99 S. Pine Ave.  -- see Cinemark 14 at The Pike 

Pine Square 16
  245 Pine Ave. -- see the AMC Pine Square 16

Plaza Theatre
   6337 E. Spring St.

Pussycat Theatre  
4501 E. Carson St. -- see Lakewood Theatre

Queen Mary  
1126 Queens Highway

Queen's Salon
1126 Queens Highway -- see the Queen Mary 

Rainbow Theatre  207 E. Seaside Way  -- see the Victor Theatre 

Ramona Theatre    681 Redondo Ave. -- see the  Ritz Theatre

Redondo Theatre
  1216 Redondo Ave.

Regal Marketplace 6
6601 E. Pacific Coast Hwy.
-- see UA Long Beach Marketplace 6 

Rialto Theatre  117 W. Pike Ave.

Ritz Theatre 
219 E. Seaside Way -- see the Tracy Theatre

Ritz Theatre   681 Redondo Ave.

Rivoli Theatre   525 Long Beach Blvd.

Roxy Theatre   127 W. Ocean Blvd.

Royal Theatre 
1126 Queens Highway -- see the Queen Mary 

Santa Fe Theatre    2170 Santa Fe Ave.

Scott's Theatre  207 E. Seaside Way  -- see the Victor Theatre 

Stanley Theatre  127 W. Ocean Blvd. -- see  Roxy Theatre  

State Theatre 
104 E. Ocean Blvd.

Strand Theatre   235 W. Pike Ave.

Tabernacle  ne corner of Locust Ave. and 3rd St.

Tarrytown Theatre -- 300 block (?) The Pike

Terrace Theatre - 1978   200 E. Seaside Way

The Lyceum  address not known

The Movie  345 E. Ocean Blvd.

The Pike Theatre  207 E. Seaside Way  -- see the Victor Theatre 

The Pike  99 S. Pine Ave.  -- see Cinemark 14 at The Pike 

Theatorium   35 Board Walk

Towne Theatre   4425 Atlantic Ave.

Tracy Theatre
  219 E. Seaside Way

Tracy Theatre  347 Pine Ave. -- see Laughlin Theatre

Tracy's Laughlin Theatre  347 Pine Ave. -- see Laughlin Theatre

Triangle Cinema    4129 Viking Way

UA Long Beach Marketplace 6   6601 E. Pacific Coast Highway

United Artists  217 E. Ocean Blvd.

Unique Theatre  336 The Pike see Byde-A-Wyle Theatre

Victor Theatre  207 E. Seaside Way

West Coast Theatre   233 E. Ocean Blvd.

West Coast Egyptian   242 E. 4th St.  -- see  Egyptian Theatre 

Wigwam Theatre  207 E. Seaside Way  -- see the Victor Theatre 

Wonderland Theatre  330 The Pike -- see Gayety Theatre 





    More About The Pike   


Visit The Pike, a wonderful site by Paul Prosise
detailing the history of the Long Beach amusement area.

See BeachCalifornia.com for more on the Pike area.

Visit Brent Dickerson's "Long Beach: Pier and Pike"
for a tour via early postcards.

The Pike is a Flickr photo pool.

Also see the Long Beach Heritage Museum
site. On the site: a 60s view of the Pike.

On YouTube check out "Revisit the Pike,"
"Long Beach Pike - slideshow," "We Met at the Pike,"
 and "The Pike."



A 1933 Austin Studio view of the Pike after the 1933
earthquake. It's in the California State Library collection.



    The 300 Block of The Pike    


We had at least 8 theatres on this block between Chestnut Place
and Cedar Walk and there are basically no photos of any of them.

These views below are what I've found
of the buildings on the block:



Here we are in 1933 -- after the earthquake. We're looking
west toward Chestnut at the remains of the 300 block. It's
a view on Ken McIntyre's Photos of Los Angeles
full size view



A 70s view in the collection of Kid Deuce on Flickr. Here we're
looking east along what's left of the Pike from Chestnut toward
the Ocean Center Bldg. The State Theatre building is beyond.
These remnants of The Pike were demolished in the 80s.
 full size view



Here's another view of the 300 block from Kid Deuce
-- perhaps from the 70s. On the left we're looking at
what probably was one of the theatres. Is it the
former Joyland at 335 The Pike?
   full size view 

Also from Kid Deuce:
 | from 1/2 block farther east  | early 80s view |
 | looking through the Ocean Center arcade |



A c.1980 view by Rick Warren on Flickr. We're again
looking east along The Pike from Chestnut Pl. 
full size view

Also from Rick Warren:
 |  Pike set -- 25 views  |  Pike aerial view -- with labels!  |
old Long Beach buildings set  | Ocean Center arcade  c.1980  |




    More Curious Long Beach Buildings    




278 Alamitos Ave. -- An auditorium and skating
rink built in 1930. The photo is from page 15 of the
Arcadia Publishing book "Long Beach Art Deco." 
full size view




The Masonic Temple on the 800 block of Locust St.
 It's now condos. The photo is from the Long Beach Press-
Telegram's "Then and Now" series by Dave Gritchen.
 full size view



The Veterans' Memorial Building and a farmers'
market. It's a postcard on the site Card Cow.
The card has a 1945 postmark.
full size view



This early 1900s postcard view looking north toward
Signal Hill appears in part 2 of Brent Dickerson's Long
Beach tour on "A Visit To Old Los Angeles."  The street at left
is possibly American Ave. (later renamed Long Beach Blvd.)
Note the curious large pinkish building on the left.
Theatre? Lodge Hall?
 larger view

A larger black and white version of the card above
appears on page 15 of "Long Beach in Vintage Postcards."




about photos from other
websites that appear on this page...


We've tried to give appropriate credit. Please
contact us if there are incorrect attributions, links that
no longer work or other issues. A link near each image will
direct you to a full size version on the website hosting it.
Assume that all the images are subject to copyright
restrictions. Contact the webmaster of the site in
question concerning reproduction or other use.





AMC Marina Pacifica 12

6346 E. Pacific Coast Hwy.

Long Beach, CA   90803  | map

(652) 430-8790    1-888-AMC4FUN


Website: www.amctheatres.com

Opened: 1984 as the Marina Pacifica 6 and got a renovation and expansion in 1997. It's now all digital projection.

Seating: 2686 with the largest being a 400 seater. The 2007 photo here is by Bill Counter. Click on the image to enlarge.

More Information: See the Cinema Treasures page on the Marina Pacifica.  The Cinema Tour page has six 2006 photos from the Adam Martin collection.


AMC Pine Square 16

245 Pine Ave.  | map

Long Beach, CA   90802

Opened: December, 1992.

Status: Closed November, 2010. Gazettes.com tells the story about the conversion of the space into condos.

The Photo: Bill Counter - 2007. Click on the image to enlarge.  Also: another view

More Information: See the Cinema Treasures page on the Pine Square 16.

American Theatre

115 - 145 E. Seaside Way    | map |

Long Beach, CA   90802

Dates: The American Theatre is listed in the 1913-14 through 1922 city directories as at 115 E. Seaside. It's in the 1923 through 1926 and the 1932 directories as at 145 E. Seaside.

The Cal State Long Beach Early Long Beach Theatres pages list the American as active c.1912 with an address of 149 E. Seaside.  They note that the building's facade had an enormous electric American flag sign. The proprietors, Helen and A.C. Frist, had such success here, they later opened the Fairyland Theatre, also on Seaside. According to the CSULB research, this venue became known as the Family Theatre by 1930.

Seating: 450      Status: Demolished.

More information: See the CSULB page on the American Theatre. The American would have been right behind the State Theatre, which was a 1919 building.

Art Theatre

2025 E. 4th St.    | map |

Long Beach, CA   90814

Opened:
In 1924 as the Carter Theatre with a somewhat oriental theme.

Architect:
  Original architect is unknown. Schilling & Schilling did a deco style remodel after the 1933 Long Beach earthquake. Upon reopening, it was called the Lee Theatre. After a 1947 remodeling, it was renamed the Art Theatre.

Seating: 636 originally.

Status: Alive and well after a restoration in 2008. It's an independently owned theatre running art house type fare. The Art Theatre is the only historic theatre still operating in Long Beach. The photo here is a 2007 pre-restoration view.

More Information: See our page on the Art Theatre.

Art

314 The Pike    | map |

Long Beach, CA   90802

Dates: The Art Theatre is listed in the 1908, 1910, 1912 and 1913-14 city directories at 314 "On The Pike."  R.H. Harrison is listed as the proprietor in Thurston's 1908 directory. In the 1912 and 1914-15 editions the address is shown as 314-316.

Seating: 450       Status: Demolished.

More information: See the CSULB page on the Art Theatre, where they list a 1907 date for the Art.

    Cal State Long Beach   

csulb.edu/colleges/cla/departments/rgrll


That's the Art Theatre on the right with the clamshell
entrance. The photo on the CSULB page about the
 Art Theatre is from the Long Beach Public Library.
full size view  | on FB/LATheatres




A wonderful c.1917-18 postcard view looking west on The Pike
with the Art down there on the left. That Hart Theatre sign on the
right is the name at the time of the Bentley Theatre. The card is
 from the collection of Ronald W. Mahan and Joseph J. Musil.
full size view  | on FB/LATheatres

Atlantic Theatre

5870 Atlantic Ave.  | map |

Long Beach, CA   90805

Opened: May 21, 1942. The Atlantic was still running Hollywood product as late as 1969. The theatre was then running burlesque revues and porno in the mid 70s. It ran a few concerts in the early 80s. American Classic Images has a view of the theatre in 1983 when it was showing Chinese and Kung Fu films.

The Atlantic also had a run with Spanish language product. It was known as the Long Beach Big Screen c.1989-1990 as a $1.50 discount theatre and then had a run as a church until around 2006. There was also a small porno theatre in a storefront south of the Atlantic's parking lot called the Front Door Theatre

Architect:
Carl Boller designed the theatre for owner Ivan C. Hanson, whose family retained ownership into the 60s. Stivers Bros. of Long Beach was the contractor for the $100,000 building. The auditorium featured murals of underwater ocean scenes including ones featuring Neptune. They glowed under blacklight during the show.

Seating: 900 originally. A report after a 1957 remodeling by Associated Theatres listed the capacity at 620.

Status:
Demolished in 2014 after a long preservation fight. The current program is that only the 75' tower and entrance terrazzo will be retained and incorporated into a new community center and library building. The Press-Telegram had a December 2013 story about the project. Gazettes ran a January 2014 story about the festival that Long Beach had organized to celebrate the theatre's demise, including a "demolition ceremony."

More information:  See the Cinema Treasures page on the Atlantic Theatre with links to many exterior photos by Ken McIntyre and others.  Cinema Tour has 8 photos from 2006.  The Art Deco Society of Los Angeles has a listing on their site for the theatre. 

Stephen Russo took a photo a few days before the 2014 demolition for the LAHTF Facebook page. There's also a nice 2011 view by Don Solosan with many comments. The L.A. Times had a 2010 article about the preservation battle.  There's also a facade photo in the Arcadia Publishing book Long Beach Art Deco.

    Michelle Gerdes on Flickr   

flickr.com/photos/smgerdes/sets


A 2009 view looking at the
interesting tower of the Atlantic.
full size view

Michelle's Theatres-California set has 10 more
exterior views of the theatre to explore.


Bentley Theatre

317 - 319 The Pike    | map |

Long Beach, CA   90802

Opened: 1908. It opened as the Bentley but has gone under many names including
the Bentley Grand, the Bentley Empress,  the Hart Theatre and, in 1919 as the Hip. An LA Times article dated March 5, 1908 mentions the Bentley, as well as lots of other action:

"SURFEIT OF THEATERS   The city, after a famine, is to have a surfeit of playhouses. A deal for a third theater was closed today between the Seaside Water Company and the E.C. Edmundson and R.C. McDonald, former manager of the Long Beach Theater. The site leased is a 58x200 foot lot between the bath-house and the Majestic Rink, and heretofore has been used as a children's playground. Mr. McDonald has the plans and capital for a modern theater which will be erected at once and will cost $40,000. Meanwhile, the new Tarrytown, a block west, is being built, and the Naples Construction Company today signed contracts to begin work on the Bentley Theater, west of the Majestic Rink." [ the "third theatre" is the Strand ]

Seating: 1,500        Status: Demolished.  Closing date is not known.

More information: See our page on the Bentley Theatre.

    Cal State Long Beach   

csulb.edu/colleges/cla/departments/rgrll


This undated photo is on the CSULB site's page about the
 Bentley Grand, 317-319 The Pike. That theatre is outlined
 in yellow with the argument that it was called the Strand
at the time. We'd suggest that the signage saying "Strand"
on its side referred to something else, perhaps a restaurant. 
full size view
| on FB/LAtheatres

The photo is from the Ronald W. Mahan and Joseph J.
Musil collection.
The theatre in the foreground is the Strand, also
known at times as the Columbia and Hoyt's at 235 The Pike.

Bijou Theatre

333 The Pike    | map |

Long Beach, CA   90802

Dates: The Bijou Theatre is listed in the 1912, 1913-14 through 1918 city directories.

Seating: Not known    Status: Demolished.

More information: Sorry, there isn't any.

Boston Theatre

344 The Pike    | map |

Long Beach, CA   90802

Dates: The Boston Theatre is listed in the 1912, 1913-14 and 1915-16 city directories as at 344.  Evidently there's a typo in the 1914-15 book as the listing gives the address as 433 The Pike. The CSULB page on the Boston Theatre lists it as still active in 1918.

Seating: Not known    Status: Demolished.

    Cal State Long Beach   

csulb.edu/colleges/cla/departments/rgrll


An undated view of the Boston from the beach on the CSULB
Boston
page. It's from the Ronald W. Mahan and Joseph J. Musil collection.
"Best Vaudeville including pictures -- best acts available"
 full size view  | on FB/LATheatres

Brayton Theatre

2157 Atlantic Ave.     | map

Long Beach, CA 90806

Opened: July 30, 1925. It was rebuilt after sustaining damage in the 1933 earthquake.

Architects: Schilling & Schilling did the 1933 re-do for owner George F. Brayton as well as the original structure.     

Seating:
850 or possibly 956. Different numbers exist.

Status: Demolished in 1972. After closing in the 50s it reopened for a time as a venue for weekend matinees for kids. Later it was a War on Poverty teen center. The theatre address is now a parking lot for the church at 2155 Atlantic.

More information: See the Brayton Theatre page on Cinema TreasuresCinema Tour also has a page on the theatre.  CSULB has a page on the Brayton Theatre.

    California State Library   




A 1933 Mott Studios post-earthquake view of the Brayton.
We're running "Her First Mate" ( a William Wyler August
1933 release) with "Sunset Pass," a Randolph Scott western.
You can join the Signal Tarzan Club!
full size view | data page

    Cal State Long Beach   

csulb.edu/colleges/cla/departments/rgrll


A c.1925 look at the pre-earthquake Brayton on the
CSULB
Brayton Theatre page. It's from the Ronald
W. Mahan and Joseph J. Musil collection.
 full size view  | on FB/LATheatres



A look at the theatre after the damage inflicted
by the 1933 earthquake. It's a photo from the
Historical Society of Long Beach. 
full size view | on FB/LATheatres


    L.A. Public Library Collection   

www.lapl.org


A 1933 shot of the Brayton in the LAPL collection.
Playing that week: "Baby Face" (released July 1933)
with Barbara Stanwyck.
full size view | on the CSULB site

The photo above also appears in the
Arcadia Publishing book "Long Beach Art Deco."

Byde-A-Wyle

336 The Pike    | map |    

Long Beach, CA   90802

Dates: CSULB researchers put the Byde-A-Wyle opening as March 2, 1908.  By 1911 they note it was the Unique Theatre. It was an open air venue at the beginning and then got roofed over.

The CSULB page on the Byde-A-Wyle Theatre notes that "Fatty" Arbuckle
was playing summer stock for $50 a week in 1908 at the theatre. While in Long Beach he met and proposed to Minta Durfee.

They were married by the Mayor, in a ticketed event, on the stage of the Byde-A-Wyle. The theatre was located across The Pike from the Virginia Hotel, where the wedding reception was held. The hotel, which opened in 1908, was located between Chestnut and Magnolia, south of Ocean Blvd.

Status: Demolished.

More Information: In the 1910 city directory we have a listing for a Long Beach Theatre at 336 The Pike. See our listing for a c.1908 Long Beach Theatre at the foot of Locust St. Perhaps they moved the operation about 5 blocks west to the 336 Pike location -- or maybe this one was totally unrelated. Or perhaps that 1910 city directory was in error.

    Cal State Long Beach   

csulb.edu/colleges/cla/departments/rgrll


An undated look at the south side of The Pike showing the
Byde-A-Wyle at 336 (and the clamshell entrance of the
Art Theatre
way beyond at 314) on the CSULB
Byde-A-Wyle page. It's from
the Ronald W. Mahan and Joseph J. Musil collection.
 full size view | on FB/LATheatres



  An undated interior look at the Byde-A-Wyle from
the Ronald W. Mahan and Joseph J. Musil collection.
Here we've roofed it over.
 full size view 



The Burgeoning 'Hollywood,' The Pike and Theatre by the Sea
page from CSULB has this program for "The Wheel of Fortune,"
a presentation of the Byde-A-Wyle Musical Comedy Co. with
Roscoe Arbuckle and Minta Durfee. In the lower right they're
advertising the August 5, 1908 "Society Night' wedding onstage of
the happy couple. Tickets were 25,50 and 75 cents. The program
is from
the Ronald W. Mahan and Joseph J. Musil collection.
full size view


    eBay   

www.ebay.com

An undated snapshot of the Byde-A-Wyle. Is that the
Wonderland/Lyric Theatre (330 The Pike) at the left?
Thanks to Michelle Gerdes for spotting this treasure!
full size view


Cabart Theatre

2342 E. Anaheim St.  | map |

Long Beach, CA   90804

Opened: 1938. Possibly closed in 1964.  The name derives from Cabrillo and Arthur. Milton K. Arthur was once an owner.  The Cabart Corp. also operated the Towne Theatre near the Crest on Atlantic.

Seating: 924

Status: The theatre structure still stands, though now remodeled and made into part of a large community center, retail and office complex.

More information: See the Cinema Treasures page on the Cabart. Included on the page are links to several 2007 Ken McIntyre photos including a facade view, screen end of the building and the interior atriumAmerican Classic Images has a January 1983 view of the building, stripped of its marquee, as the Centro De La Raza.

    L.A. Public Library Collection   

www.lapl.org


An uncredited 1954 shot from the Los Angeles
Public Library collection. The Cabart is running
 "River of No Return" in Cinemascope.
full size view

California  Theatre

1049 American Ave.    | map

Long Beach, CA  90813


Dates: The California Theatre was listed in the 1922 through 1926 and 1932 city directories.  The CSULB page on the California Theatre gives it a 1921 date and lists the seating capacity as 400-500.  American Ave. is now Long Beach Blvd.

    Cal State Long Beach   

csulb.edu/colleges/cla/departments/rgrll



A 1924 look at the theatre on the CSULB California Theatre
page. It's from the Ronald W. Mahan and Joseph J. Musil collection.
 full size view  | on FB/LATheatres

    Penny Postcards of California   


A 1933 view from Penny Postcards of
California. It looks like the end for this one.
full size view

See the site's Long Beach and
 1933 Earthquake collections.

Cinemark 14 at The Pike

99 S. Pine Avenue
    | map

Long Beach, CA  90802

(562) 435-5754

Website: www.cinemark.com


Opened: November 14, 2003. It's now digital projection on all screens.  The photo here is a 2007 view by Bill Counter. You can click on the image to enlarge.

Seating: 3572 seats total

More Information: See the Cinema Tour page for 25 photos of the complex by Adam Martin and Ron Pierce.  Also see the Cinema Treasures page on the Cinemark 14.

Circle Drive In

1633 Ximeno Ave. @ Pacific Coast Highway  | map |

Long Beach, CA   90815

Dates: 1951 - 1985. It's now demolished. It was last operated by Pacific Theatres.

More Information: See the Cinema Treasures page on the Circle for links to a number of photos.

Coughran Opera House

112 E. 1st St.  | map

Long Beach, CA 

Dates: It's in the 1904 Long Beach City Directory.  J.B. Coughran is listed as the proprietor. He also had an office building, the Coughran Block at 38-44 Pine Ave. Mr. Coughran was in the real estate business at the E. 1st St. address with a relative as Coughran and Coughran.

It's listed as the Coughlan Opera House in Julius Cahn's Official Theatrical Guide for 1904-1905 (volume 9). It's the only theatre listed for Long Beach in that edition. J.B. Coughlan [sic] was listed as manager. Seating was 550 and prices were 50 cents and 35 cents. Illumination was by both gas and electricity. Proscenium width was 25', height 16'.  Stage depth from the curtain line to the back wall was 16', curtain to footlights 3'. The listing noted that the scenery grooves may be taken up flush with the fly gallery. Show printing required was posters for 20 stands, 10 3-sheets, 20 1-sheets, and 20 half sheets.

The 1906-07 and 1908-09 editions noted that there was no theatre in Long Beach at those times.  Long Beach then had a population of 6,000.  Although perhaps not still active as a theatre, the building was still listed in the 1908 city directory under halls as Coughran Hall, 112 1/2 E. First.  The city directory for 1908 also lists the Long Beach Theatre at the foot of Locust St.

Crest Theatre

4275 Atlantic Ave.    | map |

Long Beach, CA   90807

Opened: January 23,1947. On the marquee the copy for the opening bragged about "The Worlds First Prefashioned Theatre" and "The Theatre of 303 Wonders." Fox West Coast Theatres enlisted industrialist Henry J. Kaiser to bring his wartime manufacturing expertise to economical pre-fabricated post-war theatre construction for the chain.

Architect:   Carl G. Moeller. Kaiser's engineers did much of the design work for the pre-fab steel frame building.

Seating:  1,163      Status: Demolished in 1978

More information: See the page on the Crest Theatre.

    Cinema Tour   



A look at the lobby from the Bob Meza collection.
full size view

Dale Theatre

2933 E. Anaheim Ave.    | map |

Long Beach, CA   90804

Opened: 1922 or earlier. It got a new pipe organ installation in 1924. In the 1922 through 1926 city directories it's listed as the New Dale at 2931 E. Anaheim. In the 1935 city directory it's just the Dale at 3933 E. Anaheim. In ads the theatre still used the New Dale name as late as 1949.

Seating: 400         Status: Demolished -- it's now the site of an Auto Zone Store. The closing date is unknown.

More Information: See the Cinema Treasures page on the Dale Theatre.

    L.A. Public Library Collection   

www.lapl.org



A 1947 look at the Dale Theatre from the Los Angeles
Public Library collection. The Dale is running "Nora Prentiss"
with Ann Sheridan and "Stallion Road" with Ronald Reagan.
full size view

Ebell  Theatre

1100 E. 3rd St. at Cerritos Ave.    | map

Long Beach, CA   90802

Opened: 1924 as a social club for women in Long Beach. In addition to the theatre designed for both films and stage presentations, the building included meeting rooms, a kitchen and a library.  It's also been known as Hoyt's Ebell and the Metro Ebell.  Hoyt also operated the Strand Theatre, then called Hoyt's.  The venue was still used for musical events and occasional film screenings into the 90s.

Architect:  Clark Philip       Seating: 1,000

Status: While much of the building was restored in 2004, the theatre space was converted into 11 loft apartments. The areas of the building fronting on Cerritos Ave. are available for rental for special events.

More Information: See the page on the Ebell Theatre.

    L.A. Public Library Collection   

www.lapl.org



An undated view of the Ebell building from the Library's
collection. Note the "Hoyt's" signage atop the entrance.
full size view

Edison Theatre

213 E. Broadway    | map |

Long Beach, CA   90802

The building dates from 1917. It's been a pool hall, barber shop, foot clinic, beauty shop and more. It was built out as a 99 seat flexible space theatre for CSULB's California Repertory Company in 1998.

Status: It's been vacant since 2006 when it became evident that the building had seismic problems.

More Information: See the Wikimapia listing.  Long Beach Post had a nice story on the building in 2012: "A Waste of Space.".

    Wikipedia   



A 2009 look at the Edison Theatre.
full size view

Egyptian  Theatre

242 E. 4th St.    | map

Long Beach, CA  90802


Opened: 1923 with "Little Old New York" as the initial attraction. The CSULB Egyptian page gives an opening date of April 24, 1924. A.F. Cheroske was the owner. In the 1924 and 1925 city directories it's listed at 234 E. 4th. It was also known as Cheroske's Egyptian Theatre.

In November 1925 it was sold to West Coast Theatres. The 1926 directory lists it as the West Coast Egyptian. In 1932 and 1933 it's the Fox Egyptian.  Fox West Coast was running the theatre as late as 1947.  A 1959 article about the demolition gives the address as 226 E. 4th.

Architect: Hugh R. Davies and Edward S. Baume. The theatre was a remodel project of a building that had been a garage. After World War II it got a full renovation by S. Charles Lee.

Seating: 1,180 according to Cinema Treasures. CSULB gives a seat count of 1,078.     
Status:
Demolished in 1959.  Closing date is unknown.

More Information:
See the Cinema Treasures page on the Egyptian for some good research by Ken McIntyre and Joe Vogel.

    Cal State Long Beach   

csulb.edu/colleges/cla/departments/rgrll


A 1923 look at the theatre running its opening attraction
"Little Old New York" with Marion Davies plus an "Atmospheric
Prologue." The photo on the CSULB
Egyptian Theatre page is
from the Ronald W. Mahan and Joseph J. Musil collection.
full size view  | on FB/LAtheatres

    L.A. Public Library Collection   

www.lapl.org

Long Beach Historic Theatres -- The Egyptian
A 1928 street view from the Library's collection. 
full size view



An undated proscenium view.
 full size view

    Theatres in Los Angeles   

by Suzanne Tarbell Cooper,
Amy Ronnebeck Hall and Marc Wanamaker.
Arcadia Publishing, 2008.
www.arcadiapublishing.comgoogle books preview


A great 1930 close up view of the Egyptian signage
from Marc Wanamaker's Bison Archives appears on
page 124 of "Theatres in Los Angeles."

Ken McIntyre has posted the photo on the
 Photos of Los Angeles Facebook page. See the
commentary with the post page from a
 news article about the closing.
  | a re-post  |

Fairyland Theatre

225 E. Seaside Way    | map |

Long Beach, CA   90802

Opened: The Fairyland evidently opened either in 1912 or 1913. The Fairyland is listed in the 1913-14 through 1924 city directories.

The CSULB page on the Fairyland Theatre mentions an opening around Christmas 1912 and notes that it was at the time the most elaborate theatre in Long Beach. The proprietors, Helen and A.C. Frist, had earlier opened the American Theatre. Here at the Fairlyland, noted for its "medieval terra cotta designs," they featured both films and vaudeville.

Seating: CSULB lists a capacity of 380 on one page, 600 on another.

Status: Demolished to make room for the Tracy Theatre, which opened in 1925.

    Huntington Digital Library   



The storefront just this side of the streetlight is the
Wigwam Theatre and down the block is the Fairyland
Theatre in this May, 1914 view from the Huntington Library.
full size view

The photo above was taken by G. Haven Bishop
for the Long Beach Steam Station project.


A detail from the photo above -- click on it to enlarge.

    USC Archives    

digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm


A detail from a c.1923-24 view looking east on
Seaside. It's a California Historical Society photo.
Note the roof sign for the Fairyland.
full photo

Fox Belmont


4918 E. 2nd St.   | map

Belmont Shore (Long Beach), CA   90803

Opened: 1929

Architect:  Reginald F. Inwood        Seating: 800, all on one level.

The Belmont was operated by Fox West Coast Theatres and its successor companies National General and Mann Theatres.  The theatre closed May 6, 1977 with Mann Theatres citing a lack of business. The final film was "New York, New York."

Status: The interior was gutted and the building is now used for retail along the front and the Belmont Athletic Club in the lobby and auditorium spaces.  A second story has been added to the building. It's been a gym since 1980.

More information: See the page on the Fox Belmont.

    California State Library   



A c.1929 look toward the screen.
full size view

Fox Long Beach

32 Long Beach  Blvd.    | map

Los Angeles, CA   90802

Opened: 1922 as the Empire Theatre. It was soon renamed the Mission Theatre, and in 1929 the Major.  The original address was on American Way, now renamed Long Beach Blvd.

The theatre was originally a legit operation featuring both resident and touring stock companies. It later went to vaudeville and then added films.  By 1933 it was the Long Beach Theatre and when later operated by Fox West Coast advertised as the Fox Long Beach.

Architect:  Walker & Eisen         Seating: 1,156

Status: All gone. The block has been redeveloped.  The theatre was demolished beginning in August, 1952.

More information:  See our page on the Fox Long Beach Theatre.

    L.A. Public Library Collection   

www.lapl.org

Historic Long Beach Theatres -- the Fox Long  Beach

A 20s view of downtown looking north on American Way
from
Ocean Blvd. The Mission Theatre on the right.
full size view

Front Door Theatre

5832 Atlantic Ave.  | map |

Long Beach, CA   90805

A storefront porno venue just south of the Atlantic Theatre parking lot. It was operating as late as 2006.  Ken McIntyre on Photos of Los Angeles has 2007 photos of the Front Door including signage and a look at the facade

Status: The building has been demolished.

Gayety Theatre

330 The Pike    | map |

Long Beach, CA   90802

Dates: It's running as the Wonderland Theatre in the 1908 and 1910 city directories. In 1908 H. Post is listed as the manager.  In the 1912 directory it's listed as the Pickwick Theatre.

It's listed as the Lyric in the 1913-14 directory and the Gayety in the 1914-15 directories.

Seating: Not known    Status: Demolished.

More information: Sorry, there isn't any.

Hart Theatre

1901 E. Anaheim St.    | map |

Long Beach, CA   90813

The Hart Theatre is listed in the 1924 city directory.  There's no more data at the moment.

Home Theatre

1625 E. Anaheim St.    | map |

Long Beach, CA   90813

Dates:  The Home Theatre is listed in the 1924, 1925, 1926 and 1932 city directories. Cinema Treasures researcher Joe Vogel notes on the site's page for the Roxie that the Home was mentioned in the L.A. Times in 1925 and in the Motion Picture Herald in 1932.

More information: Sorry, there isn't any.

    Long Beach Heritage   




The Home Theatre following the 1933 earthquake.
 full size view  | more earthquake photos

Imperial Theatre

319 E. Ocean Blvd.    | map |

Long Beach, CA   90802

Opened:
1926. Long operated by Fox West Coast, the theatre was also known as the Fox Imperial.  Right next door was the West Coast, also operated by Fox. At the end it was an independent operation.

The photo here of the damage after the 1933 earthquake is from the collection of Michelle Gerdes.  Click on it to enlarge.

Architect:   L.A. Smith.     Seating: 820

Status: Demolished.  The Westin Long Beach now occupies the site.

More Information: See the page on the Imperial Theatre.

Joyland  Theatre

335 - 341 The Pike    | map |

Long Beach, CA   90802

Dates: According to CSULB research, this venue opened as the Arrowhead Theatre, running from May 1911 until August 1911. It was built by the California Motion Picture Manufacturing Co. as a promotional vehicle for their films. The CSULB researchers mention that the address, on the West end of The Pike puts it directly across The Pike from the Byde-A-Wyle / Unique Theatre at 336.

The CSULB page on the Arrowhead Theatre notes that the Long Beach Press ran an article in June 1912 reporting "that workmen were busy remodeling and redecorating the old Arrowhead Theatre, to be renamed 'Joyland,' the 'Homeland of the Silent Actors.' At this renovated theatre there would be loges at the rear of the audience, equipped with movable and individual chairs, with a total seating capacity of 100 persons. In addition, there would be a special box for private parties in one corner, and the newspaper emphasized that the moving picture machine would be operated from a fire-proof cabinet."

The CSULB page also mentions “Long Beach’s Nickel Movie Days,” a story from August 2, 1964 Independent Press Telegram by Maymie Krythe. Krythe notes that the theatre was a venture of   William J. Fahey and William Raymond. When the partnership broke up, Fahey became the owner of the Joyland, ran Paramount product with an orchestra added. The price was raised to ten cents.

Under the name Joyland Theatre it's listed at 341 The Pike in the 1913-14 Long Beach city directory. It's at 337 in the 1914-15 and 1915-16 directories. It's listed as at 335 The Pike in 1916-17.

In the 1914 Los Angeles phone book the address is shown as "On Pike." The 1915 edition includes W J Fahey as proprietor.  Fahey went on to, among other theatrical ventures, the Palace and the State.

Seating: 100    Status: Demolished.

La Petite Theatre


236 Pine Ave.   | map |

Long Beach, CA   90802

Dates: Opened in 1907, closed due to financial problems in 1908.

CSULB's page on the La Petite notes that this theatre was the the first built in Long Beach especially for the purpose of showing movies.  The first film exhibition in Long Beach had been at the Tabernacle in 1900. The Burgeoning 'Hollywood,' The Pike and Theatre by the Sea CSULB page discusses the La Petite with comments from
Claudine Burnett, of the Long Beach Public Library:

 "...in 1907, La Petite Theatre, at 236 Pine Avenue, became the first establishment in Long Beach especially built as a movie house. Burnett  states that patrons could see a movie at La Petite for 10 cents, to view Edison’s latest productions: 'The Bell-Ringer’s Daughter,' 'The Flexible Man,' and 'The Fairy of the Spring.' The program was changed Monday, Wednesday and Friday evenings. In addition, Burnett states that the manager of La Petite, Mr. Erwin, attempted to have only the most recent films, yet, despite his efforts to make La Petite a great success, his enterprise failed to make enough profit, and the theatre closed in 1908."   

Status: Demolished.

More Information: There isn't any. All we know on this one comes from the CSULB information.


Lakewood Theatre

4501 E. Carson St.    | map |

Long Beach, CA   90808

Opened: In 1945. Later twinned. It ran for a number of years as a Pussycat Theatre then reverted to a family policy.

Architect:  S. Charles Lee

Seating: 1124                     Status: Demolished.  It closed in the late 80s.

More Information: See our page on the Lakewood Theatre.

    S. Charles Lee Archive - UCLA   

http://digital.library.ucla.edu/sclee/


Looking toward the screen in a Julius Schulman photo.
full size view

Lakewood Drive In

2100 Carson St.  | map |

Long Beach, CA   90807

The Lakewood Drive In, just east of Cherry St., opened in 1948. It was designed by Clifford and William Glenn Balch for Pacific Theatres.  Closing date is unknown. It's been demolished with a Ralph's now on the site.

More information: See the Cinema Treasures page on the Lakewood D-I.

LaShell Theatre

5384 Long Beach Blvd.  | map |

Long Beach, CA   90805

Opened: 1924 or earlier as the Oriental Theatre. At some point it was also known as Murray's Theatre -- or perhaps it was Murray's Oriental.

It got a deco remodel, probably as a result of the 1933 earthquake and emerged as the LaShell Theatre.  The theatre evidently stopped running films around 1955 and then had a life as a home for the LaShell Players through at least 1959, afterward becoming a retail space.

Seating: 450      Status: Currently used as a warehouse.

More Information: See the page on the LaShell Theatre.

    L.A. Public Library Collection   

www.lapl.org


A 1947 look at the LaShell from the Library's collection.
full size view

Laughlin Theatre

347 Pine Ave.    | map

Long Beach, CA   90802

Opened: 1915 for operator Homer Laughlin, Jr. In 1933 it's listed as the Tracy.  The marquee in 1933 called it Tracy's Laughlin.  Eugene Tracy also operated the former Ritz/Capitol on Seaside, renaming that one the Tracy Theatre in 1934.

Architect:  Irving Gill           Seating: 800

Status: It sustained major damage in the 1933 earthquake and was not used as a theatre again. The building was repaired and used as storage. Demolition of the structure was in 1956.

More information: See the page on the Laughlin Theatre.

    USC Archives    

digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm



A view looking at the Laughlin Theatre by Winstead
Photo, Long Beach. It's from the California Historical
Society collection.
full size view

Long Beach Theatre

foot of Locust Ave.   | map

Long Beach, CA   90802

Dates: A Long Beach Theatre is in the 1908 Thurston's Long Beach city directory as at the foot of Locust Ave. and operated by the Colonial Amusement and Building Co. It's not in the 1907 directory. O.L. McDonald was the president and manager, J.E. Lutz, VP and treasurer, Chas. Lambrecht, secretary.

It also gets a mention in the L.A. Times in 1908 -- see the article under the Bentley Theatre listing. A Long Beach Theatre is listed in the 1910 directory at 336 The Pike -- which would place it on the south side of The Pike, near the Bentley. Perhaps they moved the operation about 5 blocks west from the Locust St. location. See our listing for the Byde-A-Wyle Theatre at 336 The Pike.  Mysteries.

Seating: 1500 in the 1908 Henry's listing       Status: Demolished.

More information: Sorry, there isn't any more except the listing in Henry's Guide:

    Henry's Western Theatrical Guide - 1908   

On Google Books: | Long Beach listing - 1908 |

Long Beach Drive In

Santa Fe Ave. and 223rd St   | map |

Long Beach, CA   90810

Dates: This 1200 car drive-in opened in 1955 and was demolished for a business park in 1980. Aladdin Theatres and Berman Bros. were the operators. The 405 is just south of the site.

More Information: See the Cinema Treasures page on the Long Beach Drive In.

Los Altos Drive In

2800 N. Bellflower Blvd   | map |

Long Beach, CA   90815

Dates: Pacific Theatres opened this 2100 car drive-in in 1955. It was later triplexed. It closed in 1996.

More Information: See the Cinema Treasures page on the Los Altos Drive In.

Long Beach Stadium 26

7501 E. Carson St   | map |

Long Beach, CA   90715

Opened: The Edwards Long Beach Stadium 26 opened in 1999. Perkowitz and Ruth were the architects. Since 2002 it's been operated by Regal.

More Information: See the Cinema Treasures page on the Stadium 26.  The Cinema Tour page on the theatre has 19 photos by Scott Neff and Adam Martin from 2006.  Also see the Regal website.

The Lyceum

address unknown

Long Beach, CA

Dates: The CSULB research has a listing for The Lyceum but other than mention of a film program, evidently from 1907, there's no address or other data. No listing has surfaced in the city directories consulted so far.

The Movie

345 E. Ocean Blvd.    | map |

Long Beach, CA   90802

Dates:  Running from the late 60s through the mid-80s. This porno venue operated by Walnut Properties was a remodel from what had previously been retail space.  It was just east of the West Coast Theatre.

Status:
Demolished -- the site is now part of the Westin Hotel development.

    American Classic Images   

americanclassicimages.com



A 1983 view of the Movie, The West Coast and the
Imperial
from the American Classic Images collection.
 full size view

Also in the collection:
  |  another 83 view - from the west |

Municipal Auditorium

Municipal Auditorium      Building #1
S. Pine Ave. & E. Seaside Way   Long Beach, CA   90802    | map |

Opened:
1905    Capacity: 6000

The building was of wood frame construction built on pilings on the beach.

Status: Demolished after the new auditorium was completed in 1932.  See the great USC Archives aerial view that shows both buildings.

    L.A. Public Library Collection   

www.lapl.org



A 1929 view from the pier.  That's the State
Theatre building beyond the 1905 Auditorium.
 full size view

Long Beach Municipal Auditorium     Building #2
300 E. Ocean Blvd., Long Beach, CA 90802    | map

Opened:
1932    Architect: J. Harold McDowell

The new Auditorium building extended 500 feet out into the Pacific Ocean. It had a symphony hall in the rounded end of the building facing the ocean. Also there was a huge exhibition space with a flat main floor and a balcony (with fixed seats) wrapping around.

Status: Demolished in 1975 for the Pacific Terrace Theatre and Long Beach Convention & Entertainment Center. 

    USC Archives    



A proscenium detail of the 1932 building.
full size view

Pacific Terrace Theatre   Building #3

200 E. Seaside Way, Long Beach, CA  90802    | map |

Opened: 1978 -- on the site of the 1932 Municipal Auditorium. 

Seating: 3,051    Architect: Allied Architects


More Information: See the page on the three Municipal Auditorium buildings.

Palace Of Pictures

300 block (?) on The Pike   | map |

Long Beach, CA   90802

Dates: The Palace of Pictures is not listed in one 1908 city directory but it does appear in Thurston's 1908 city directory as "on the Pike." It's not in the Thurston 1909-1910 directory.

The Palace of Pictures is in the listings in the trade magazine The Billboard for 1907, 1908 and 1909. It's also mentioned in the 1907-1908 edition of Henry's Western Theatrical Guide. It notes that Southwest Amusement Co. is the operator and they're doing 3 shows a day.  See the Henry's listings under the Long Beach Theatre listing.

Seating: 250       

More information:
See the CSULB page on the Tarrytown.  They give an address of 313 The Pike, aka "Walk of a Thousand Lights," with the note that the Tarrytown was also known as the Palace of Pictures, although probably wrong as both names are listed in at least one 1908 city directory.  And where does the Pastime Theatre at 311 on The Pike figure in? Were they side by side?  Successors at the same site? See our Tarrytown Theatre listing for more confusion.

Palace Theatre

30 Pine Ave.    | map

Long Beach, CA   90802

Opened: September 30, 1916 as Fahey's Palace.

Architect:  H. Alfred Anderson.

Warner Bros., Fox West Coast and Walnut Properties all operated the Palace at various times.  It's also been known as the News Palace and the Newsreel Theatre.

Seating: 850

Status: Closed in 1984 and later demolished. The whole block has been redeveloped.

More Information: See the page on the Palace Theatre.

    L.A. Public Library Collection   

www.lapl.org


A 1917 entrance view of Fahey's Palace Theatre.
full size view


Pastime Theatre

311 The Pike    | map |

Long Beach, CA   90802

Dates: The Pastime Theatre is listed in the 1912, 1913-14 and 1914-15 city directories.

Seating: Not known    Status: Demolished.   More information: Sorry, there isn't any. Is this the same venue as the earlier Tarrytown Theatre or Palace of Pictures? Unknown.

Plaza Theatre

6337 E. Spring St   | map |

Long Beach, CA   90808

Dates:  This one opened in 1966 and closed in 1977. One of the owners was Jack Feder, who also had the Roxy downtown. Originally intended as an upscale art house, the theatre went to a family policy soon after opening.

Seating:
500          

Architect:
Kenneth Wing, who also designed the Long Beach Arena, designed the $250,000 building.

Status:
The building is still there but is now used for retail and a Subway.

More Information:
See the page on Cinema Treasures for all the information that's known about the Plaza.

Queen Mary

1126 Queens Highway    | map |

Long Beach, CA   90802

Website: www.queenmary.com     Launch: 1934

    Cinelog    




A look at the Queen Mary's first class cinema c.1936. The photo appears
on Christopher Crouch's post about the ship: "Golden Era Cinema at Sea"
where he notes "At the time of the ship’s launch, the movie theatre was
promoted as being “talkie” equipped and featuring a “giant screen” for the
“leisurely pleasure” of first class passengers. While the theatre’s sound
quality remains a matter of conjecture, the “giant screen” claim looks to
 have been a bit of marketing creativity (even by standards of the day).
 full size view

The view above also appears on Card Cow.

    Queen Mary Life University Experience    

www.sterling.rmplc.co.uk



The third class cinema/lounge/lecture hall in 1936.
The photo appears on a page devoted to the
 "Queen Mary Life University Experience."
larger view

Status: The first class cinema area was gutted and turned into kitchen space after the ship was decommissioned in 1967. 

More Information:
  Cinema Treasures has listings for the "Queen's Salon," a banquet area seating 250 in the middle of the ship on the Promenade Deck. It's used for concerts, films and dining.  There's also a listing for the "Royal Theatre," at the stern near sea level. It formerly was used as the crew's entertainment area. It has 110 seats in arrayed stadium style.

Redondo Theatre

1216 Redondo Ave   | map |

Long Beach, CA   90813

The Redondo Theatre is listed in the 1918 city directory. There's no more data at the moment.

Rialto Theatre

117 W. Pike Ave.    | map |

Long Beach, CA   90802

Opened: Around 1917.  The Rialto was just down the block from the Theatorium.

Seating: 462

Status: Running at least until 1947. Now demolished.

More Information: See our page on the Rialto Theatre.

    Card Cow   

www.cardcow.com


A delightful postcard view on the Card Cow site that gives us a
glimpse of the Rialto (on the corner) and, up the block to the
left, the Theatorium. 
full size view

Ritz Theatre

681 Redondo Ave   | map |

Long Beach, CA   90814

Opened: 1925 or earlier.  Cinema Treasures researcher Joe Vogel reports that construction was announced in the July 19, 1924 issue of Building and Engineering News. It's in the 1925 and 1926 city directories as the Ramona Theatre.  It's in the 1932 and 33 Polk's directories as the Ritz Theatre.

Architects: Seibert & Hedden, Frank Wynkoop designed the two story $35,000 building.

Seating: 520

Closed: It was destroyed by fire on December 12, 1951. It was a total loss except for the four walls and a candy machine.

More Information: See the Cinema Treasures page on the Ritz.  Cinema Tour has a page on the theatre. If you're looking for the other Ritz in Long Beach, see our page on the Tracy Theatre, which used the Ritz name at one point. 

    L.A. Public Library Collection   

www.lapl.org


A 1947 look at the Ritz playing "Down
To Earth" with Rita Hayworth.
full size view

Rivoli Theatre

525 Long Beach Blvd.  | map |

Long Beach, CA   90802

Opened: The Rivoli opened in 1937 with the address originally listed as American Ave. before the street got renamed. In the 50s and 60s it was operated by Cabart Theatres as a first run. By the 70s it was a 49 cent bargain house. It was running as late as 1980 with Pacific Theatres the final operator.

Architect: Floyd E. Stanbery         Seating: 1105

The Rivoli in the Movies:  The Rivoli appears in "It's a Mad, Mad, Mad World" (United Artists, 1963) where there's a glimpse of it from the YMCA building being used as the police station. 



In the photo above, we see the Rivoli
in the opening credits
of "Loose Shoes"
(Brooksfilms / National American, 1980).
The
screenshot is from Cinema Treasures contributor Deanna Bayless.
 

larger view | the credits on You Tube.

Status: The Rivoli was demolished to make way for the now-defunct Long Beach Mall.

More information:   See the Cinema Treasures page on the Rivoli for lots of information contributed by Deanna Bayless and others.

    American Classic Images   




The Rivoli is on the right in this 1955 photo
from the American Classic Images collection.
 full size view

Roxy Theatre

127 W. Ocean Blvd.    | map

Long Beach, CA   90802

Opened: Around 1916 as the Liberty Theatre. It became the Stanley Theatre sometime before 1931. It's in the 1932 and 1933 Polk's directories as the Stanley.  Sometime after 1940 it became the Roxy Theatre.

Seating: Reported numbers range from 760 to 900 seats

Status: The Roxie was running as late as 1983 and was demolished later in the 80s.  The block has been redeveloped.

More information:  See the page on the Roxy Theatre.

    L.A. Public Library Collection   

www.lapl.org


An undated view of the proscenium of
the theatre when it was the Liberty.
full size view

Santa Fe Theatre

2170 Santa Fe Ave   | map |

Long Beach, CA   90810

Opened: Not known.        Seating: 948

Status: It was converted into a bowling alley in the 50s and demolished in the 80s.  There are now apartments on the site.

More Information: See the Cinema Treasures page on the Santa Fe.

    American Classic Images   

americanclassicimages.com



A 1983 look at the Santa Fe after
conversion to a bowling alley.
full size view  |  1983 side view

State Theatre

104 E. Ocean Blvd.    | map |

Long Beach, CA   90802

Opened: 1919

Architects: Harvey H. Lochridge and Kirkland Cutter designed the Markwell Building (later renamed the Jergins Trust Building) and the State Theatre inside. 

The State Theatre was operated by William Fahey who also had interests in other Long Beach theatres. The theatre was the major film and vaudeville house in Long Beach until the West Coast came along in 1926 to share the spotlight.

Seating: 1800

Status: Closed in 1977. Demolished in 1988 for a big condominium project that was never completed.

The State Theatre in the Movies: The exterior of the State briefly shows up in the final chase scene of "It's A Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World" (1963).

More Information: See our page on the State Theatre.

    California State Library   

www.library.ca.gov

 
A wonderful 1931 night view of the State in the California
Library collection. It's a C. C. Pierce photo
full size view | data page


Strand Theatre

235 W. Pike Ave.    | map |

Long Beach, CA   90802

Opened: Around 1910 as the Columbia Theatre. It became the Strand Theatre around 1916. The 1919 directory lists it as Hoyt Theatre "On The Pike." It became the Strand again sometime prior to the 30s. The theatre was still running vaudeville in the late 40s.

The Strand had closed by the late 60s. The Pike amusement area, which had opened in 1902, continued to operate until 1979.

Architects:  The original architect is unknown.  It got a remodel in the 20s, possibly by William Lee Woollett, architect of the Million Dollar and Metropolitan. 

Seating: 1362

Status: Demolished.

More Information: See our page on the Long Beach Strand Theatre.

    L.A. Public Library Photo Collection   



An undated view of the Strand / Hoyt's auditorium
from the LIbrary's collection.

 full size view


Tabernacle

ne corner Locust and 3rd   | map |

Long Beach, CA   90802

Dates: Built in the 1880s

CSULB's page on The Tabernacle notes that this theatre was the site of the first film exhibition in Long Beach. The Burgeoning 'Hollywood,' The Pike and Theatre by the Sea CSULB page discusses this Tabernacle:

"According to Claudine Burnett at the Long Beach Public Library, Long Beach’s enthusiastic involvement with movies began at the turn of the century. In Burnett’s chapter, 'Long Beach Motion Picture Industry: 1911-1923,' she explains that the first motion picture was shown, June 22, 1900, in the old Tabernacle, at the northeast corner of Third Street and Locust Avenue. It was an Edison picture with a combat, along with marine scenes. The Tabernacle was also an historical building, erected in the 1880s by the Chautauqua Assembly of Long Beach. In 1900, the Tabernacle was the only assembly hall in Long Beach, a small town then with a population of 2,252 inhabitants.For a small town, the Tabernacle could serve and did serve many functions at the same time—theatre, lecture hall, and church."

Status: Demolished.

More Information: All we know on this one comes from the CSULB information.  See the La Petite Theatre listing for information on the first theatre in Long Beach built expressly for showing films.

    Cal State Long Beach   

csulb.edu/colleges/cla/departments/rgrll



On the CSULB page about the Tabernacle we
 get a look at this architectural wonder. They
 credit the photo to USC Special Collections.

Tarrytown Theatre

on The Pike   (313?)   | map

Long Beach, CA   90802

Dates: The Tarrytown Theatre was running in 1908 and maybe in 1907. Possibly it moved sometime in its life. It was an open air venue, at least for awhile.

It's listed in Thurston's 1908 city directory as "on The Pike."  It's also mentioned (as "the new Tarrytown" -- was there an older one?) in the the 1908 L.A. Times article that appears in in the Bentley listing.  It's not listed in the Thurston directories for 1907 or 1909-1910. 

See the CSULB page on the Tarrytown. They just list a 1907 date for the theatre and for two photos. They're the only source we have for both the address, as 313 The Pike aka "The Walk of a Thousand Lights," as well as the conclusion that this was the same venue later called the Palace of Pictures.

The Palace of Pictures suggestion is probably not correct as we find both venues listed in the 1908 Thurston Long Beach city directory. And the Palace of Pictures was evidently running as early as 1907 and maybe lasted into 1909. See our listings for the Palace of Pictures and the later Pastime Theatre at 311 for more confusion and unresolved issues.

Seating: 800 according to the CSULB research.

    Cal State Long Beach   

csulb.edu/colleges/cla/departments/rgrll


A c.1907 photo of the Tarrytown appears on the
 CSULB page about the Tarrytown. The photo is
from the Historical Society of Long Beach.
 full size view  |  on FB/LATheatres



An oudoor performance at the Tarrytown,
again a Historical Society of Long Beach
photo on the CSULB Tarrytown page.

Theatorium

35 Board Walk   | map |

Long Beach, CA   90802

At the foot of Pine Ave., a walkway continued out toward the (original) Municipal Auditorium at the Ocean Ave. level.  On the west side of the boardwalk, one could walk down a sloped street toward The Pike. The Theatorium was about a half block down from Ocean Ave.

Opened: 1908 or earlier -- evidently by William Fahey, who later operated the Palace and the State.  Signage on the side of the building in 1908 called it the National Theatorium.  It's not in Thurston's 1908 city directory.

Status: Demolished. The closing date is unknown -- perhaps around 1917.  The Pike area where the Theatorium and Rialto theatres were is now a parking lot. 

More Information: See our page on the Theatorium

    L.A. Public Library Collection   

www.lapl.org


The Theatorium in 1912.
full size view

Towne Theatre

4425 Atlantic Ave   | map |

Long Beach, CA   90807

Opened:  Milt Arthur opened the modernistic Towne Theatre on September 29, 1946. His Cabart Corp., which also operated the Cabart Theatre, had its headquarters there. The Towne advertised "Metropolitan Glamour" and initially had a sit down fountain style snack bar.  The theatre also had a stage for special events.

The Towne was several blocks north of the Crest Theatre, which opened four months later.    Pacific Theatres ended up as the operator.

Architect: Hugh Gibbs          Seating: 1,308 originally, later 1200. There was no balcony.

Status:  The roof fell in and building was put up for sale in 1977.

More Information: See the Cinema Treasures page on the Towne Theatre for lots of discussion.

    Boxoffice   




The Towne got a big spread in the December 7, 1946 issue
of Boxoffice. Here's a look at the exterior from the article. 
full size view  | article page one

The photo above also appears
on Photos of Los Angeles.



The Towne's lobby in a photo from the Boxoffice article.
full size view  | article page two

Tracy Theatre

219 E. Seaside Way    | map

Long Beach, CA   90802

Opened: May 24, 1925 as the Ritz Theatre. Later in 1925 it was renamed the Capitol. In 1934 it became the Tracy.

Architect:  Carl Boller of Boller Bros. The building included a restaurant, 6 stores on the ground floor and two penthouse apartments among other spaces.

Seating: 1,158 originally. When it was reseated in 1941 the capacity was advertised as 1,200.

Status: The theatre closed in the early 50s and then had several years use as a church before becoming derelict. It was demolished in 1974.

More Information: See our page on the Tracy Theatre.

    L.A. Public Library Collection   

www.lapl.org



A c.1925 view of the Tracy Theatre, when it was
 named the Capitol, from the Library's collection.
full size view

Triangle Cinema

4129 Viking Way    | map |

Long Beach, CA   90808

Opened:  This venue on a diagonal street west of Bellflower Blvd. and north of Carson St. opened in 1973 as the Triangle Cinema, a family oriented theatre, with "Paper Moon" and "Harold and Maude."   In 1975 it adopted an artie policy under the name Coronet. It was later the Paradise, a bargain house that also occasionally featured concerts on its small stage. It closed in 1990. 

Seating: 360  

Status:
The building is still there with the former theatre space now part of a sports bar.

More Information:
See the Cinema Treasures page for the whole story researched by Ron Pierce.  Ron speculates that the theatre was a remodel from an existing building in the 1951 vintage strip.

United Artists

217 E. Ocean Blvd.    | map |

Long Beach, CA   90802

Opened: 1931 ?  It's in the 1932 Polk's city directory.

Architects: Clifford Balch, A.R Walker and P.A. Eisen. This house was strictly for the movies, with no stage facilities.

Seating: 1242

Like all the other United Artists houses, the UA Long Beach was initially operated by Fox West Coast. In the 1950s it was operated directly by the United Artists Theatre Circuit.

Status: The theatre ended its days as a porno venue operated by the Mitchell Bros. It was emolished in the 1980s.

More Information: See our page on Long Beach's United Artists Theatre.

    California State Library   

www.library.ca.gov



Right sidewall and ceiling detail.
 full size view | data page

UA Long Beach Marketplace 6

6601 E. Pacific Coast Highway
  | map

Long Beach, CA   90803

(652) 430-2228

Websites: regmovies.com


Opened:
1976. One screen was equipped for 70mm presentations. Since 2002 it's been operated by Regal and runs a mix of mainstream, foreign and specialty releases.  The 2007 photo here is by Bill Counter. Click on it to enlarge. Extra added feature: pumpjack in the parking lot.

More Information: See the Cinema Treasures page on the UA Marketplace 6.  The Cinema Tour page on the Marketplace has five 2006 photos by Adam Martin and Scott Neff.

Victor Theatre

207 E. Seaside Way    | map |

Long Beach, CA   90802

Opened: This one evidently opened as the Wigwam Theatre sometime around 1914. In 1925 and 1925 it's listed as Scott's Theatre. It's in the 1932, 1933 and 1935 city directories as the Pike Theatre. By 1938 it was offering triple features as the Victor Theatre. In 1950 it got renamed the Rainbow Theatre -- and got a remodeling.

Seating: 396

Status: Demolished.  Closing date is unknown.

More information: See the page on the Victor Theatre.

    USC Archives    

digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm


A c.1923-24 view looking east on Seaside.
At our end of the block we see the Victor Theatre
(then the Wigwam) getting a remodel. It's a
California Historical Society photo.
full size view

West Coast

333 E. Ocean Blvd.    | map |

Long Beach, CA   90802

Opened: July 7, 1925 for the West Coast Theatres circuit. In 1928 the theatre got the Fox banner after acquisition of the circuit by William Fox.

It was later operated by Mann Theatres and finally dropped by the chain in 1974 as it was no longer a viable operation in declining downtown Long Beach. It had spells as a rock venue, church and Mexican film house before closing for good in 1985.

Architects: Meyer and Holler, better known for their work in Hollywood for Sid Grauman at the Egyptian and the Chinese.

Seating: 2038 - the largest in Long Beach.      Status: Demolished in 1987.

More Information: See our page on the West Coast Theatre.

    UCLA - S. Charles Lee Archives   



A c.1931 proscenium view in the S. Charles Lee Archives.
Mr. Lee did drawings for a proposed 1931 art deco makeover
 of the house, but that project was not realized.
full size view