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20160827


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^^^ click on the graphic for additional information ^^^


THE LODZER SYNAGOGUE

Shabbat Bulletin - August 27, 2016




Make shul and Judaism an important part of your lifestyle

Bimah Matters:

  1. A fascinating and condensed version of the meaning of Love - by Isi Davis.  (Read both the short and long versions here in their entirety, or in our members area.)

  2. Updated and interesting  reasons why Moses was prohibited from entering the Holy Land (Moses’ failures in leading the people and the effects on the Israelites if he were permitted to enter the Holy Land.) - by David Birkin

  3. On the relationship between Tisha b’Av and the week’s portion and the differences in relating to those closest to us and others  - by our cantor Marcel Cohen.



“Where in the world is Rabbi Eli?”   -- 20160822 - Norway is lovely

Norway is lovely.

Gorgeous nature, wide spaces, narrow fjords, well cared-for ecosystems, and warm and welcoming people turn it into a prime tourist destination (not exactly an inexpensive one, either - but that's another discussion for another day).

The roads can be quite taxing. Narrow and steep winding serpentine, picturesque as it is, can easily demand some 10 hours to cover the same 450 km that in Canada would be done in less than 5. The group spent a relaxing Shabbat on the western fjords, near the town of Alesund.

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Look at the man in the middle; the moment he saw us, he dropped everything and ran indoors to get his "Love for Israel" shirt. Apparently, they have A Club of Israel Lovers (sic!) at their church. Last year, they charted a special plane to fly Alesund - Tel Aviv - Alesund for an unforgettable 2-weeks vacation in the Holy Land.
Olav (that's his name) says Israelis don't know how lucky they are to live in such an interesting country where news is never boring. Hmm... is that really a blessing, or at least a double-edged sword?

Between the trains, ferries, fjords, feeding the group, traveling, and introducing activities, my messages turned somewhat shorter. I do realize that and thank you for your indulgence. Arielle, my youngest, sends her regards (between working in our kitchen, singing Shabbat songs, and sightseeing from my shoulder, she is having the fun of her lifetime!).

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Now, our correspondence doesn't have to be one-sided. Why don't you drop me a line, telling me how your summer has been up till now? I heard it was hot - but what else? Did you go places? Learn anything new? Done anything exciting? Felt anything special?
Please, do tell.
Send your message to lodzercentre@rogers.com. A picture or two will be especially appreciated - and won't be left unanswered.

Shabbat Shalom,
Rabbi Eli




The Lodzer Music Festival. The first presentation was a huge success with over 200 people attending and rave reviews from the audience.


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The next in our series on Jewish Music, on Sunday, August 28, 7 PM will be:
"Where Does that Tune Come From?"  The Musical Origin of Popular Jewish Melodies.
Presented by: Charles Heller


Kudos to "The History of Klezmer Music"

Presented by Raisa and Viktor Orshansky

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We are now on YouTube

Click on the pic to go to our channel




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Silent Auction for tickets

to see

Tom Jones at Casino Rama

Sunday September 18, at 7:00 PM

Jeff Shabes is donating two tickets to see Tom Jones at Casino Rama


The seats are located in Section M7 Row 5 seats & 6. Each ticket is worth $77.97 and will be given to the highest bidder. ALL PROCEEDS will be given to the shul
Please send your bid by email to lodzercentre@rogers.com or contact the office and please ensure that your name is on the bid.  The bidding will close on September 8, 2016 at 5PM.

Please bid generously!!




If anyone has tickets for any event that they would like to donate to the shul please let the office know. It is a simple way to raise money for our synagogue so please donate spare tickets and bid generously.


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Birthdays


Aug. 21 Annette Sacks

Aug. 28  Karyn Drewnowsky
Sept. 1   Jenny Finkelshtain
Sept. 1   Fay Simmons
Sept. 1   Brian Taran


Anniversaries

Aug. 20  Warren Zweig and Denise Shanker
Aug. 24  Samuel and Sonia Holtzman
Aug. 26  Sydney and Lily Markowitz

Yahrzeits


Aug. 22  Yitzchak Abramowitz, husband of Ida, father of Miriam Epstein
Aug. 24  Chaim Rochwerg, father of Alisa Schwartz
Aug. 26  Boruch Krupski, husband of Zelda

Aug. 27  David Haber, father of Ellen Dagan
Aug. 27  Reva Macklis, mother of Sylvia White
Sept. 1   Ben Shedletzky, brother of Joseph




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Saturday,

August 27

23 Av


Birkot

ha-Shachar

9:12 AM

Led by

Frank Steiman


Yishtabach

9:30 AM

Kiddush Lunch


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This week’s Kiddush is

sponsored by:


The Lodzer Congregation



Torah Times

Torah Reading: Triennial Year 3

Parashat:

Ekev (Deuteronomy)

1: 10:12-15
2: 10:16-22
3: 11:1-9
4: 11:10-12
5: 11:13-15
6: 11:16-21
7: 11:22-25
maftir: 11:22-25

Haftarah: Isaiah 49:14 - 51:3



Candle Lighting: 7:44 p.m. – Friday

Havdalah: 8:50 p.m. – Saturday



Pirke Avoth Discussion Group

with Jonathan Usher


Every shabbat, after the kiddush there is a vibrant discussion on ethics


Sunday,

August 28

7 PM

Lodzer

Centre

Congregation


12 Heaton St.

416-636-6665

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"Where Does that Tune

Come From?"


The Musical Origin of Popular Jewish Melodies.


Presentation by:

Charles Heller

Saturday,

September 3

30 Av

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BowTies

For the

Men!

Kiddush Lunch


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Let us welcome the new month by wearing our fancy hats.

(every Sabbath before the new moon)



To sponsor a Kiddush

please call the office

416-636-6665



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Sunday,

September 4

1 Elul

Rosh Chodesh

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Come welcome the month of Elul, the month of turning, self evaluations, of teshuvah (returning) and renewal, as we gather in the comfort of community with our Lodzer family and, in a safe space, delve into our deepest selves, beginning the journey of chesbon hanefesh that will prepare us for the High Holy Days to come.

Wednesday,

September 7
7:30-8:30 pm


Shul

Parsha of The Week

(POW)

with Judy Hazan



POW returns Sept. 7

Enjoy the Summer!


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Join this lively group every Wednesday night at 7:30 PM at The Lodzer where we study the week’s sedra together. Classes are informal and no prior knowledge or preparation is required. The purpose of the class is to learn the story of the parsha, determine its most important elements and tie its morals and lessons into our daily lives. This is open to the public and there is no cost.

For more information contact:

Judy Hazan 416-704-1693

Sunday,

September 11

7 PM

Lodzer

Centre

Congregation


12 Heaton St.

416-636-6665

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The Yiddish Theatre.


Presentation by:

Faye Kellerstein



Thursday,

September 15

7:30 PM

Beth David

Free?

Jonah and the Whale


Jonah is read on Yom Kippur, teaching us about our spiritual voyage.

A study of Jonah: texts of Repentance and Forgiveness.


Lecturer:  Dr. Aaron Nussbaum


Call Beth David at 416-633-5500 to register.

Thursday,

September 15

7:30 PM

Shul

Book Chat

with Cathy Zeldin


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Some News About Book Chat

Book Chat is moving to Thursdays at 7:30 pm at the Lodzer and we'll meet every 6 weeks.

Since the High Holidays begin erev October 2, we can start to meet again in mid- September.

Our first book is "The Illegal" by Lawrence Hill on September 15.

Our next book will be "Pumpkin Flowers" by Matti Friedman on October 27.  There's time to get it from the library before then and it is well worth the read; recommended by the Jewish Book Council.

We can begin to choose future books as a group at our September 15 meeting.

I hope everyone is having a fantastic summer!

September 17

1978


Zeitgeist


Camp David Accords


When President Carter assumed office in 1977, the Middle East was in turmoil, and peace talks were going slowly. Israel and Egypt had been at war since the birth of the state of Israel, attack after attack. Western nations were worried that the Middle East was about to boil over into world war. President Carter vowed to bring the two nations into a peace agreement.

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Egyptian President Anwar Sadat, U.S. President Jimmy Carter and Israeli Prime Minister Menachem Begin join hands after the Camp David Accords Sept. 18, 1978, in the East Room of the White House. (David Hume Kennerly/Getty Images)

Sunday,

September 18

7 PM

Lodzer

Centre

Congregation


12 Heaton St.

416-636-6665

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Jewish Music of North Africa.


Presentation by:

Cantor Aaron Bensoussan



Today’s ‘Spotlight’ features

Cantor Bensoussan’s story.


Tuesday,

September 20

10 - 11:30 AM


Bernard

Betel Centre


$4 members

$7 otherwise

Lifelong Learning Lectures


Mission Impossible:

The Jewish philosophical view

of who humans are,

how we are to live

&

the human special mission.

An interactive discussion contrasting the mainstream approach to philosophical anthropology asking, “What is Man (Humanity)” to the Jewish approach asking, “What is our Mission as Humans in this Universe?”.


Speaker: Sheldon Richmond, Ph.D, Independent Scholar, Philosophy Performer & Systems Analyst

Thursday,

September 22

7:30 PM

Beth David

Free



Canadian

Institute for

Jewish

Research

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See flyer for registration

information.

Jewish Enemies of Israel:

Panel Discussion in Toronto


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They are not self-hating Jews.

They don’t hate themselves.

They hate us./db


Who amongst us are enemies of Israel?

September 22

2007


Zeitgeist


(full Story)

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For risking his life to save orphans, and entertaining generations of fans without uttering a word, we honor Marcel Marceau.

When Marcel was 16, the Nazis marched into France , and the Jews of Strasbourg - near the German border - had to flee for their lives. Marcel changed his last name to Marceau to avoid being identified as Jewish, and joined the French resistance movement.


Masquerading as a boy scout, Marcel evacuated a Jewish orphanage in eastern France . He told the children he was taking them on a vacation in the Alps, and led them to safety in Switzerland . Marcel made the perilous journey three times, saving hundreds of Jewish orphans. He was able to avoid detection by entertaining the children with silent pantomime.

Sunday,

September 25


Yizkor

Service


10:30 AM


Michael Levitt

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mlevitt.liberal.ca

Lodzer Annual Yizkor Service


Guest Speaker: Michael Levitt


The Soul Lives On

The essence of every human life is the soul. After death, the soul lives on. Yizkor is about life, death and eternity; about the core mission we all share to bring light, life, kindness and goodness into this often dark and cruel world; about the transcendent bond and timeless connection between you and someone you loved, and still do. Yizkor is far more than a ritual or prayer. Yizkor is a gift from your soul in this world, to the soul of your loved one, in the next world.


Rosh Hashanah


Sunday eve, Oct. 2 , 2016, and Monday and Tuesday all day Oct.3, 2016 and Oct. 4, 2016.


Rosh Hashanah is a sort of Sabbath for the soul: “On the first day of the seventh month,” says the Almighty, “you are to have a day of rest, a sacred assembly commemorated with trumpet blasts.”

  • One long.

  • Nine staccato.

  • Three broken.

It is considered a great mitzvah to hear the shofar on Rosh Hashanah.


The Jewish New Year

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October 6

1973


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The Yom Kippur War


On Saturday October 6th, 1973, as all of Israel came to a standstill to observe the High Holiday of Yom Kippur, Egyptian and Syrian forces launched a surprise attack against Israel knowing she would be caught off-guard.

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Yom Kippur


Tuesday eve, Oct 11,
2016, and Wed., all day Oct. 12, 2016.

Kol Nidre and Day of Atonement

(fast and break the fast)

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Sukkot


Sunday eve, Oct 16, 2016, and Monday and Tuesday all day, Oct. 17,  and Oct. 18, 2016




Sukkot is a time to commemorate dwelling in temporary structures as guests of the Lord.


Feast of Tabernacles

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Hoshanah Rabah and
Shmini Atzeret


Sunday, Oct 23, 2016
Monday, Oct.24, 2016 and Yizkor

Eighth Day of Assembly



On the last day of Sukkot, Hoshana Rabba, we beat a bundle of willow branches (actually one is enough) on the floor. To prepare the ground for the rain to penetrate.


Falling just after Sukkot, Shemini Atzeret is the holiday on which Jews start praying for rain.


“On the eighth day you should hold a solemn gathering; you shall not work at your occupation.”



Simchat Torah


Monday eve, Oct. 24 and all day Tuesday, Oct 25, 2016


Simchat Torah is the holiday that celebrates the conclusion of the yearly cycle of reading the Torah, after which we begin anew reading the Five Books of Moses, starting from the first chapter of Genesis.


Day of Celebrating the Torah


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Thursday,

October 27

7:30 PM

Shul

Book Chat

with Cathy Zeldin

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"Pumpkin Flowers" by Matti Friedman.

It is well worth the read; recommended by the Jewish Book Council.

The hill, in Lebanon, was called the Pumpkin; "flowers" was the military code word for casualties.


Part memoir, part reportage, part history, Friedman’s powerful narrative captures the birth of today s chaotic Middle East and the rise of a twenty-first-century type of war in which there is never a clear victor and media images can be as important as the battle itself.

Sunday,

October 30

7 PM

Lodzer

Centre

Congregation


12 Heaton St.

416-636-6665

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The Jewish Role in Jazz

and the

Israeli Jazz Scene.


Presentation by:

Reuven Grajner


November 2

1917



Zeitgeist


The Balfour Declaration, written as a letter on November 2, 1917, from British Foreign Secretary Arthur Balfour to British Jewish leader Baron Lionel Walter Rothschild, pledged British support for a “national home for the Jewish people” in Palestine. The declaration is one of the iconic documents in, and represents one of the great moments of, Zionist history.

“His Majesty's Government view with favor the establishment in Palestine of a national home for the Jewish people, and will use their best endeavors to facilitate the achievement of this object, it being clearly understood that nothing shall be done which may prejudice the civil and religious rights of existing non-Jewish communities in Palestine, or the rights and political status enjoyed by Jews in any other country.”

Arthur Balfour

Sunday,

November 6

7 PM

Lodzer

Centre

Congregation


12 Heaton St.

416-636-6665

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The Golden Age of Cantorial Music.


Presentation by:

Cantor David Nemtzov

Sunday,

November 20

7 PM

Lodzer

Centre

Congregation


12 Heaton St.

416-636-6665

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Jewish Music of The Middle East:

Part One.


Presentation by:

Cantor Aaron Bensoussan



Sunday,

November 27

7 PM

Lodzer

Centre

Congregation


12 Heaton St.

416-636-6665

All classes are on Sunday at 7 pm:

Free of charge.

Donations are welcome.

Refreshments will be served following

each presentation.


This project is funded

In part by the

Government of Canada

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Jewish Music of Eastern Europe.


Presentation by:

Raisa and Viktor Orshansky

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Sunday,

December 4

7 PM

Lodzer

Centre

Congregation


12 Heaton St.

416-636-6665

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Jewish Music of The Middle East:

Part Two.


Presentation by:

Cantor Aaron Bensoussan

Sunday,

December 18

7 PM

Lodzer

Centre

Congregation


12 Heaton St.

416-636-6665

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Israeli Music.


Presentation by:

Cantor David Edwards





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א טויבער האט געהערט,ויי א שטומעכ האט דערציילט,

אז א בלינדער האט אליין געזען,ווי א קרומער איזגעלאפן.


A toiber hot gehert, vi a shtummer hot dertzeilt,

az a blinder hot alein gezehn, vi a krummer iz geloffen.


A deaf person heard a mute,telling about a blind person,

who saw a lame one running........


Metaphorical Meaning:

A Description Of Exaggerated Stories.


The Source For The Combination of Characters:

Then the eyes of the blind will be uncovered, and the ears of the deaf will be opened.

Then the lame will leap like gazelles, and the tongue of the mute will sing.

( Yeshayahu 35:5,6)

                                                           .....................


אן עצה פרעגט מען דעם רבין,א ברכה בעט מען ביי ידען גוטן איד.


An eitza fregt men dem rebbin,a brocheh bet men bei yeden guten Yid.


One seeks advice from the rabbi; any good Jew may be asked for a blessing.


From The Sources:

He who takes the advice of sages will not falter.

( Shemos Rabbah 3:10.)


Do not consider lightly the blessing of an ordinary person.

( Berachos 7a.)




When wrapping the scrolls we sing...

The Words as we sing them are.......

Al Shlosa Devarim, Al Shlosha Devarim,
( On three things, on three things )


Al Shlosha, Shlosha Devarim, Ha Olam, Ha Olam Omed.
(On three, Three Things, The World, The World Stands.)
Repeat once.


Al Ha Torah, V' Al Avoda, V' Al  Gemmilus Chassidim.
(On The Torah, And On Divine Worship, and on Deeds of Loving Kindness).
Repeat once.


The World Stands on Three Three Things.
On Torah, On Divine Worship, And On Deeds of Loving Kindness.
( Pirke Avot )



When there is a second Torah to wrap we sing " Torah, Torah, Torah " !!    Why?

...Perhaps, a lesson for another day.


(Sometimes I get caught up in the melodies… to the exclusion of all else.)



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Ethics of the Fathers:


There are four types of temperaments:

One whom is easily angered and easily appeased - his virtue cancels his flaw.


One whom it is difficult to anger and difficult to appease  - his flaw cancels his virtue.


One whom it is difficult to anger and is easily appeased is pious.


One who is easily angered and is difficult to appease is wicked.


Pirke Avoth Perek 2 Mishnah 19


“We may well be unable to respond properly (to the apikorus) because we do not have adequate knowledge of the basic principles and tenets of our faith. We must exert ourselves, become eager to learn, and then we will be in a position to counter these arguments….


At no time does he (Rabbi Elazar) recommend starting a discussion with an unbeliever.


Know how to answer an unbeliever – if he begins a taunting discussion.


Generally, however, it is rather futile to discuss religion with those who do not believe.”


Question: Is this true and does it apply to speaking to anti-Semites, anti- Israel individuals, and atheists?




The beautiful thing is,

music can be like a time machine.

One song…

the lyrics, the melody, the mood…

can take you back to a moment in time like nothing else can.


See you at our next in the series on Jewish Music,

on Sunday, August 28, 7 PM
"Where Does that Tune Come From?"

The Musical Origin of Popular Jewish Melodies.
Presented by: Charles Heller




Quotes of the Day

"My words fly up, my thoughts remain below: Words without thoughts never to heaven go"

(Pirke Avoth or Hamlet?)




Haimishe Humour - (By Frank White and his lovely associate)

So Who is the Biggest Cheapskate?

1.  Silverman picked up his date in a taxi.  She was so pretty, he could hardly keep his eyes on the meter.

2.  Long-time employee:  "Mr. Richman, tomorrow is our golden wedding anniversary.  Could I please have the day off?"
Boss Richman:  "And I suppose ten years from now you'll want another day off for the diamond anniversary?"




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Snacking and Satiation

EIKEV
BY SHIRA D. EPSTEIN, ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF JEWISH EDUCATION IN THE WILLIAM DAVIDSON GRADUATE SCHOOL OF JEWISH EDUCATION
POSTED ON AUGUST 07, 2015 / 5775 |  A DIFFERENT PERSPECTIVE

Moses relays to the People of Israel that when they eat and are “satisfied,” they should bless God for the land that was given to them (Deut. 8:10). This passage from Parashat Eikev, incorporated into the Birkat Hamazon (Grace after Meals), tethers the sensation of fullness and abundance to the act of offering gratitude for the source of our food. In this modern era of overly-processed packaged goods and “in-between snacking,” how many of us are actually tuned into the moment when we experience satiation, or take the time to consider the original source of what we ingest? We crunch on cookies in between errands, slurp sodas at our desks, and leave a trail of crumbs behind us as we hurry to catch a bus.


In order to fulfill this mandate of appreciation, we need to honor mealtimes as opportunities for mindfulness and to recognize when our bodies are full, and to offer gratitude for this gift.




Smoke and Mirrors: Analyzing Canada’s Response to the Genocide of the Yazidis

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Temple entry at Lalish, the main temple of the Yazidi faith.


(Spoiler Alert: We’re jumping to the last paragraph.)


The Government of Canada’s response after acknowledging a genocide is occurring against the Yazidis is in violation of commitments made under Article 1 of the CPPCG. The government’s approach stems from a foreign policy agenda which ideologically adheres to training and peacekeeping, irrespective of what the situation requires. Additionally, the decision to remove Canada’s fighters from the mission in Syria makes it politically inconvenient to send soldiers into Syria once again; however, this may be what is needed. If the thousands of Yazidi women still held as sex slaves in Syria are hoping to be saved, at this time, they should forfeit any hope that Canada will deliver their salvation.




Daily Minyan

Sunday – Friday: 9:00 am

We alternate with Beth Radom

on Sunday - check the schedule

posted on the side door.

Run by Arthur Zins

includes Breakfast following.


Come Daven, Fress & Schmooze,

then join in on a walk.


Saturdays: Shabbat Service

Birkot ha-Shachar 9:12 AM

 - (Led by Frank Steiman)
Yishtabach 9:30 AM

includes Kiddush Luncheon


Cemetery plots for sale to members in good standing (three years minimum).

If you are a member (3 years or more) and want to buy a plot, the cost per plot is $2500.

If you know anyone wanting a plot - the person can pay three years' membership dues and then be entitled to buy a plot.

This is an opportunity to purchase before prices increase.

Please call Sarah Senior, Lodzer Office Administrator,

for more information and to order:  416-636-6665


Contributions

Please consider sponsoring a kiddush, or contributing to the building, programming, or any specific interest fund, by phoning the shul office at

416-636-6665


Lodzer committee

members needed!

Help is always needed at the shul. Volunteer for a committee – you’ll be appreciated! Just call the office – 416-636-6665 and put your name in. The committee Chairperson will contact you.

Help us get the word out

Share the bulletin!

Lodzer Sisterhood Cookbooks

Great Gifts – just $20 each

Contact the Office at

416-636-6665

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Tree of Life or Seat Plaques

Remember family and friends by purchasing a leaf on our tree of life or a sanctuary seat plaque. Call the office at

416-636-6665.


Chesed Committee

Please call the shul office if you need support or if you know of one of our members who may need support. It remains confidential.

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Office Hours

Monday through Thursday

9 am - 1 pm and 2 pm - 4 pm

Friday

9 am to 1 pm

Executive

Jeff Shabes, President

Harvey Storm

Jonathan Usher

Morry Nosak

Marilyn Richmond                                

Board Members

Joe Ber

Henry Epstein

Roz Greene

Judy Hazen

Rafi Remez

Frank Steiman

Arnie Yudell


Honourary Member

Leon Pasternak


Rabbi Eli Courante

Cantor Marcel Cohen

B’aal Koreh:

Harvey Bitterman

Gabbai: Arnie Yudell

Bulletin Editor:

Jonathan Usher

e-Bulletin:

Charles Greene

Office Manager:

Sarah Senior


Website:

Who we are - Contact Info

Memberships

Bar and Bat Mitzvahs

High Holy Days 2016

Rabbi’s Corner


Shabbat Bulletin

For submissions/feedback:

lodzercongregation@gmail.com


Lodzer Office

For all business related e-mail:

lodzercentre@rogers.com




Reminder #1 - Don’t just say “Never again”, Make it happen!

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The Yazidi are an ancient,

indigenous, monotheistic

people who live in

Iraq and Syria.

Canada has declared that what is happening now to the Yazidis is a genocide.


As a synagogue founded by Holocaust survivors, we would like to form a working group of interested members to work with Project Abraham to help bring Yazidis to Canada.

If you are able to help in any way, or want more information, contact
Dora Usher
doradusher@gmail.com




Reminder - take a senior moment to read this!

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Dr. Rosalie Shadlyn

Cantor Marcel Cohen spoke at the last “Sundays at Seven” about a new initiative being launched:

“Seniors Mentoring Program for Kadima Participants”


We are calling on a select group of seniors to volunteer in a unique music mentorship program, run by Cantor Aaron Bensoussan, for a series of 6 music jam and mentoring sessions with Kadima Centre participants. The program will be held from September until November 2016 on Sunday afternoons from 2PM to 3:30PM.


For almost 40 years, Dr. Rosalie Shadlyn, Chair Emeritus of the Kadima Committee, has ensured the continuity and vibrancy of The Kadima Centre at Beth Emeth Bais Yehuda Synagogue. It is due to Dr. Shadlyn’s inspired leadership and decades of dedication that The Kadima Centre remains strong, successful and highly relevant today.




The Lodzer Congregation - YIZKOR BOOK 2016 - 2017

This year’s Yizkor Book will be published for use during the High Holy Days 2016 and Yizkor Services throughout 2017.  Take this opportunity to remember your loved ones by having their names inscribed in our Annual Yizkor Book.  
Please call 416-636-6665, or drop by the Synagogue office.  
The deadline for receipt of dedications is September 12, 2016.




High Holy Days 2016


Dear Members:
High Holiday time is upon us once more.


You may reserve by coming directly to the shul office, by telephone or by mailing or emailing back the form you received to lodzercentre@rogers.com


We wish to stress the importance of your immediate response, if you want to reserve your High Holiday seats.  There’s no guarantee of the same seats as in prior years due to seating plan changes.


All unreserved seats will go on sale to the public August 22, 2016.


FAMILY SERVICES – DOWNSTAIRS SANCTUARY (LIMITED SEATING)
LEADER:  ARLENE MOSHE

(Main service tickets sold separately.)


For pricing and additional information.




Bimah Matters: “A story about Love”  by ISI DAVIS



Our condolences on the recent passing of Isi’s brother in law Dr. G Remocker.


Here’s the short version, read this past Shabbat:


A few weeks ago my grandson asked me to play soccer.  He was well aware that in my earlier years I played soccer at university and later coached both my boys for several years. Off we went to the park to have some fun. . It was a hot and muggy evening, and I requested that we have a rest. We went over to the bench and enjoyed a cool breeze that was blowing in from a nearby tree. I told him that I loved the way he played, and that he could out maneuver me on occasion.  Then it happened, he asked me what is love. I had to think for a moment, and tried to answer, in the context he asked the question. I don’t think he fully understood my answer, and he said that he still did not know what love was,   could he touch it,   could he feel it   or could he see it.  It was left at that,    and we continued to play soccer.
That evening, I thought about the question. The next morning I went to my computer,   and looked up the word love.    There were so many definitions that truly, they all made sense, BUT I still was not satisfied by the answers,    by both scientist and clergy.


Scientific view:
Biologically, love is a powerful neurological condition, like hunger or thirst, only more permanent. We talk about love being blind or unconditional, in a sense, we have no control over it.     THAT,    is not so surprising, since love is basically chemistry.


Religious view:
And you shall love the Lord your G-d with all your heart and with all your soul, and with all your might.

Love is the central theme of torah
Thou shalt love thy neighbour as thyself.
G-d exists in all of us, including our neighbors.

I picked up the local newspaper a few days later and noticed an article BewareThe Celebrity Carat Curse. (Toronto Star)


When Miranda Kerr, dined out over the weekend, cameras pointed at her finger. The ring became the fixation of the media. Kerr was not the only celebrity to flash her ring, Pippa Middleton was snapped up by the tabloids wearing an engagement ring while she was jogging. “The article further goes on to say,    that while no doubt thrilled to be engaged,    they should also be mindful of the way we can now safely call the celebrity carat curse. That is because the psychological impetus to buy and display preposterous finger jewelry always points to a spiritual void that is not fully grasped by these celebrity couples. That is, because they believe size matters.  They don’t realize how they are inadvertently monetizing their love in a way that will negatively impact all future emotional transaction during time of marital stress.  

I should have realized it at the time, but I think I had the answer when my grandson asked me the question, what is love.


Love is respect, not being possessive, there is no envy or jealousy, love being together,    and having lots of fun.   I was having fun playing with my grandson.    I don’t think he would have understood that at the time.


I wonder what would have happened,    if we had played tennis     and I yelled out     LOVE


The longer version with a psychological twist:

A few weeks ago my grandson asked me to play soccer.  He was well aware that in my earlier years I played soccer at university and later coached both my boys for several years. Off we went to the park to have some fun. . It was a hot and muggy evening and I requested that we have a rest. We went over to the bench and enjoyed a cool breeze that was blowing in from a nearby tree. I told him that I loved the way he played and that he could out maneuver me on occasion with his quick footwork.  Then it happened, he asked me what love is. I had to think for a moment and tried to answer, in the context he asked the question. I don’t think he fully understood my answer and he said that he did not know what love was, could he touch it, could he feel it or could he see it. It was left at that and we continued to play soccer.


That evening, I thought about the question. The next morning I went to my computer and looked up the word love. There were so many definitions that truly, they all made sense but I still was not satisfied by the answers given by both scientist and clergy.


From a scientific view:
Biologically, love is a powerful neurological condition like hunger or thirst, only more permanent. We talk about love being blind or unconditional, in the sense that we have no control over it. But then, that is not so surprising, since love is basically chemistry.


From a religious view:
And you shall love the Lord your G-d with all your heart and with all your soul, and with all your might.


Love is the central theme of the torah
Thou shalt love thy neighbour as thyself.


From my perspective, G-d is in all of us including our neighbour.


I picked up the local newspaper a few days later and noticed an article Beware the Celebrity Carat Curse.  (Toronto Star)


When Miranda Kerr dined out over the weekend cameras pointed at her finger. The ring became the fixation of the media. Kerr was not the only celebrity to flash her ring, Pippa Middleton was snapped up by the tabloids wearing an engagement ring while she was jogging. “The article further goes on to say that while no doubt thrilled to be engaged, they should also be mindful of the way we can now safely call the celebrity carat curse. That is because the psychological impetus to buy and display preposterous finger jewelry always points to a spiritual void that is not fully grasped by these celebrity couples. That is because they believe size matters.  They don’t realize how they are inadvertently monetizing their love in a way that will negatively impact all future emotional transaction during time of marital stress.  


Is love material wealth, is it someone who wants to possess someone else. I was still having difficulty with the question. Everywhere we look we are seduced by society trying to market love.


A week later while sitting on a plane to Vancouver, the individual beside me, told me that he lost his wife a few years ago and that he tried to find someone who he could love again. He tried to go on dates and some lasted a few months, but he could not find someone he could love.  He told me that after a while he no longer believed in love.  This was an ordinary man just like you and me. What made this man different was his way of thinking. This man had a lot of experience trying to find love. Much of his time was spent searching for love, only to find that it did not exist.  This man appeared to be quite intelligent, he told me that he was a university professor, nevertheless he was unhappy. So the best I could do was listen and show some interest. His logic seemed to be very strong. He further said that love was like a drug, it was capable of making him very high and could be highly addictive. He made me think, what would happened if he never received his daily dose of love. He made me realized that the one who had the most need for love was the one that was addicted and the one that had little need controlled the whole relationship.


When I looked up the definition of love related to Judaism, there were several answers, but the one that struck me the most was the one standing under the chopa and when the rabbi says, will you take this person and love them with all your heart in good times and in bad, love them and respect them. What is amazing is that couples believe these promises and make more promises. What you find after a while that few of these promises are kept, and the war of words start to take control. Who will be the provider and who becomes the addicted. The pain over time grows and grows. They stay together because they are afraid to be alone, afraid of others opinions and judgments.


I thought later what would happen if he found someone who also did not believe love existed. I went on further to imagine what would happen if they married had children, he was devoted to his job and she was devoted to their children. He continued to develop his career and made his success and image outside the home, which was very important to him. After a while they both grew apart and they discovered that they did not need each other anymore. She stayed at home as the children needed a mother. Now the children were grown and left the house. After a while they reconfirmed that love does not exist. We look for love and we open our hearts and become vulnerable, just to find selfishness.


I should have realized it at the time, but I think I had the answer when my grandson asked me the question, what is love.


Love is respect, not being possessive, there is no envy or jealousy, love being together and having lots of fun. I was having fun playing with my grandson.  I don’t think he would have understood that at the time.


I wonder what would have happened if we had played tennis and I yelled out LOVE


(Great passion Isi, thanks)




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