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20160813


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THE LODZER SYNAGOGUE

Shabbat Bulletin - August 13, 2016




Make shul and Judaism an important part of your lifestyle

FREDA delivered the D’var Torah on  August 6th.


Freda Kon told the beautiful and amazing story of meeting and marrying her husband despite the love story being interrupted by the Holocaust.




Shalom from Vilna

Rabbi Eli

“Where in the world is Rabbi Eli?”



Fellow Congregants,


As most of you know, I haven’t written any material for the Shabbat Bulletin because I firmly believe that this is a forum for all of you to contribute to and enjoy. I am however breaking my “silence” in order to provide my talk (D’var Torah) with a shameless plug.  


As many of you know the last time I spoke to the congregation was during last year’s High Holidays and it generated some passionate opinions both positive and negative as well as much appreciated feedback.  I am hopeful that my talk this Shabbat although nowhere near as controversial will generate some discussion and feedback that will be published in upcoming Bulletins.  In the past few weeks there has been some feedback to various articles that have been published and I strongly urge you to continue supplying the editors with such feedback. This will help to keep our bulletin fresh and to some degree opinionated. Our Editors work hard to keep you all informed and entertained so please share ideas for articles, opinions, cartoons, good news, bad news or anything else that I may have missed that you would like to see published.


As far as my talk on Shabbat, well I guess you will need to attend to find out what I have to say -- if not, you may end up reading about it here.  


Shabbat Shalom
Jeff Shabes




Project Abraham met to discuss the situation of the Yazidis and to develop a process to help these people before they are killed by Isis or others.  Although the United Nations has declared that what is happening to the Yazidis is a genocide, our government is not taking any special action to allow some of them to immigrate to Canada.




The Lodzer Congregation - YIZKOR BOOK 2016 - 2017

This year’s Yizkor Book will be published for use during the High Holy Days 2016 and Yizkor Services throughout 2017.  Take this opportunity to remember your loved ones by having their names inscribed in our Annual Yizkor Book.  
Please call 416-636-6665, or drop by the Synagogue office.  
The deadline for receipt of dedications is September 12, 2016.




High Holy Days 2016


Dear Members:
High Holiday time is upon us once more.


You may reserve by coming directly to the shul office, by telephone or by mailing or emailing back the form you received to lodzercentre@rogers.com


We wish to stress the importance of your immediate response, if you want to reserve your High Holiday seats.  There’s no guarantee of the same seats as in prior years due to seating plan changes.


All unreserved seats will go on sale to the public August 22, 2016.


FAMILY SERVICES – DOWNSTAIRS SANCTUARY (LIMITED SEATING)
LEADER:  ARLENE MOSHE

(Main service tickets sold separately.)


For pricing and additional information.


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Birthdays


Aug. 7    Sonia Goldlust
Aug. 10  Rachel Weisman
Aug. 12  Honey Hellreich
Aug. 12  Sheila Stahl

Aug. 15  Esther Tschaschnik
Aug. 18  Leila Young
Aug. 19  Deborah Berlach


Anniversaries

Aug. 10  Robert & Sally Berger
Aug. 10  Sidney & Barbara Lew
Aug. 10  Harvey & Helen Storm

Yahrzeits


Aug. 7    Leo Kon, husband of Freda

              and father of Lily Silver Markowitz
Aug. 7    Harry Markowitz, father of Sydney
Aug. 7    Bernard Steiman, brother of Frank
Aug. 8    Hava Lea Sosner, mother of Sarah Moshe
Aug. 11  Louis Slutchuk, father of Nancy Corey
Aug. 12  Gary Dorchik, husband of Milla,

               father of Suzan Dorchik and Lisa Gold
Aug. 12  Annie Hercberg, mother of Helen Storm

Aug. 13  Hy Shulman, father of Karyn Drewnowsky
Aug. 15  Jacob Kabacznik, husband of Alla
Aug. 15  Reuben Yellin, father of Susan Yellin-Iseman
Aug. 16  Harry Epstein, father of Arie and Henry
Aug. 17  Libby Ricer, mother of Fay Rotstein
Aug. 18  Reuben Sidenberg, father of Allen
Aug. 19  Sam Friedenrich, son of Ester,

               brother of Ricki Black




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Wednesdays

7:30-8:30 pm

Parsha of The Week

(POW)

with Judy Hazan



POW returns Sept. 7

Enjoy the Summer!


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Join this lively group every Wednesday night at 7:30 PM at The Lodzer where we study the week’s sedra together. Classes are informal and no prior knowledge or preparation is required. The purpose of the class is to learn the story of the parsha, determine its most important elements and tie its morals and lessons into our daily lives. This is open to the public and there is no cost.

For more information contact:

Judy Hazan 416-704-1693


Shabbat

after the kiddush

Pirke Avoth

Discussion Group

with Jonathan Usher


Every shabbat, after the kiddush there is a vibrant discussion of one Mishnah of Pirke Avoth.


“Welcome everyone with joy”


Saturday,

August 13

9 Av


Birkot

ha-Shachar

9:12 AM

Led by

Frank Steiman


Yishtabach

9:30 AM


Tisha B'Av Service at Lodzer       
                
Starting with Mincha

at 8:15 p.m.

Kiddush Lunch


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This week’s Kiddush is

co-sponsored by:


The Lodzer Congregation



Torah Times

Torah Reading: Triennial Year 3

Parashat Divarim (Deuteronomy)

1: 2:31-34
2: 2:35-37
3: 3:1-3
4: 3:4-7
5: 3:8-11
6: 3:12-14
7: 3:15-22
maftir: 3:20-22


Haftarah:

Isaiah 1:1 - 1:27


Candle Lighting: 8:06 p.m. – Friday

Havdalah: 9:13 p.m. – Saturday



Sunday,

August 14

10 Av


Tisha B'Av Service at Lodzer


9 a.m.

Why Is Tisha B'Av

Important For Israel?


As we go about our daily lives, how important is it to recall the painful destruction that the Jewish people have endured time and time again?

Is there a way to translate this memory of the past into action for the future?

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Saturday,

August 20

16 Av


Birkot

ha-Shachar

9:12 AM

Led by

Frank Steiman


Yishtabach

9:30 AM

Kiddush Lunch



To sponsor a Kiddush

please call the office

416-636-6665




Sunday,

August 21

7 PM

Lodzer

Centre

Congregation


12 Heaton St.

416-636-6665

All classes are on Sunday at 7 pm:

Free of charge.

Donations are welcome.

Refreshments will be served following

each presentation.


This project is funded

In part by the

Government of Canada

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The History of Klezmer Music.


Presentation by:

Raisa and Viktor Orshansky

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Sunday,

August 28

7 PM

Lodzer

Centre

Congregation


12 Heaton St.

416-636-6665

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"Where Does that Tune

Come From?"


The Musical Origin of Popular Jewish Melodies.


Presentation by:

Charles Heller

Sunday,

September 11

7 PM

Lodzer

Centre

Congregation


12 Heaton St.

416-636-6665

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The Yiddish Theatre.


Presentation by:

Faye Kellerstein



Thursday,

September 15

7:30 PM

Shul

Book Chat

with Cathy Zeldin


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Some News About Book Chat

Book Chat is moving to Thursdays at 7:30 pm at the Lodzer and we'll meet every 6 weeks.

Since the High Holidays begin erev October 2, we can start to meet again in mid- September.

Our first book is "The Illegal" by Lawrence Hill on September 15.

Our next book will be "Pumpkin Flowers" by Matti Friedman on October 27.  There's time to get it from the library before then and it is well worth the read; recommended by the Jewish Book Council.

We can begin to choose future books as a group at our September 15 meeting.

I hope everyone is having a fantastic summer!

Sunday,

September 18

7 PM

Lodzer

Centre

Congregation


12 Heaton St.

416-636-6665

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Jewish Music of North Africa.


Presentation by:

Cantor Aaron Bensoussan



Today’s ‘Spotlight’ features

Cantor Bensoussan’s story.


Tuesday,

September 20

10 - 11:30 AM


Bernard

Betel Centre


$4 members

$7 otherwise

Lifelong Learning Lectures


Mission Impossible:

The Jewish philosophical view

of who humans are,

how we are to live

&

the human special mission.

An interactive discussion contrasting the mainstream approach to philosophical anthropology asking, “What is Man (Humanity)” to the Jewish approach asking, “What is our Mission as Humans in this Universe?”.


Speaker: Sheldon Richmond, Ph.D, Independent Scholar, Philosophy Performer & Systems Analyst

Thursday,

September 22

7:30 PM

Beth David

Free



Canadian

Institute for

Jewish

Research

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See flyer for registration

information.

Jewish Enemies of Israel:

Panel Discussion in Toronto


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Are there Canadian Jews who are enemies of Israel?

Sunday,

September 25


Yizkor

Service


10:30 AM


Michael Levitt

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mlevitt.liberal.ca

Lodzer Annual Yizkor Service


Guest Speaker: Michael Levitt


The Soul Lives On

The essence of every human life is the soul. After death, the soul lives on. Yizkor is about life, death and eternity; about the core mission we all share to bring light, life, kindness and goodness into this often dark and cruel world; about the transcendent bond and timeless connection between you and someone you loved, and still do. Yizkor is far more than a ritual or prayer. Yizkor is a gift from your soul in this world, to the soul of your loved one, in the next world.


Rosh Hashanah


Sunday eve, Oct. 2 , 2016, and Monday and Tuesday all day Oct.3, 2016 and Oct. 4, 2016.

The Jewish New Year

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Yom Kippur


Tuesday eve, Oct 11,
2016, and Wed., all day Oct. 12, 2016.

Kol Nidre and Day of Atonement

(fast and break the fast)

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Sukkot


Sunday eve, Oct 16, 2016, and Monday and Tuesday all day, Oct. 17,  and Oct. 18, 2016

Feast of Tabernacles

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Hoshanah Rabah and
Shmini Atzeret


Sunday, Oct 23, 2016
Monday, Oct.24, 2016 and Yizkor

Eighth Day of Assembly


RFI


Simchat Torah


Monday eve, Oct. 24 and all day Tuesday, Oct 25, 2016

Day of Celebrating the Torah

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Thursday,

October 27

7:30 PM

Shul

Book Chat

with Cathy Zeldin

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"Pumpkin Flowers" by Matti Friedman.

It is well worth the read; recommended by the Jewish Book Council.

The hill, in Lebanon, was called the Pumpkin; "flowers" was the military code word for casualties.


Part memoir, part reportage, part history, Friedman’s powerful narrative captures the birth of today s chaotic Middle East and the rise of a twenty-first-century type of war in which there is never a clear victor and media images can be as important as the battle itself.

Sunday,

October 30

7 PM

Lodzer

Centre

Congregation


12 Heaton St.

416-636-6665

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The Jewish Role in Jazz

and the

Israeli Jazz Scene.


Presentation by:

Reuven Grajner


Sunday,

November 6

7 PM

Lodzer

Centre

Congregation


12 Heaton St.

416-636-6665

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The Golden Age of Cantorial Music.


Presentation by:

Cantor David Nemtzov

Sunday,

November 20

7 PM

Lodzer

Centre

Congregation


12 Heaton St.

416-636-6665

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Jewish Music of The Middle East:

Part One.


Presentation by:

Cantor Aaron Bensoussan



Sunday,

November 27

7 PM

Lodzer

Centre

Congregation


12 Heaton St.

416-636-6665

All classes are on Sunday at 7 pm:

Free of charge.

Donations are welcome.

Refreshments will be served following

each presentation.


This project is funded

In part by the

Government of Canada

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Jewish Music of Eastern Europe.


Presentation by:

Raisa and Viktor Orshansky

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Sunday,

December 4

7 PM

Lodzer

Centre

Congregation


12 Heaton St.

416-636-6665

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Jewish Music of The Middle East:

Part Two.


Presentation by:

Cantor Aaron Bensoussan

Sunday,

December 18

7 PM

Lodzer

Centre

Congregation


12 Heaton St.

416-636-6665

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Israeli Music.


Presentation by:

Cantor David Edwards





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אז מימאנט ירושה-געלט, צאלט מען קבורה-געלט.


Az m'mont yerysha-gelt, tzolt men kvura-gelt.


If you demand the inheritance money, you have to pay the funeral expenses.


Metaphorical Meaning:

A person who comes to claim his rights is often asked to discharge his obligations as well. As a rule, rights and obligations go together.


                                                        .................................


אז םיעסט אויף דעמ בייגל, וואוי קומט אהין דער לאך ? אין קעשענע !


Az m'est oif dem beiges, vu kumt ahin der loch? In kesheneh!!


When you eat the bagel, where does the hole go? Into your pocket!!


Metaphorical Meaning:

A cynical remark that expresses one's reaction to spending too much money.
                                        



Israeli Victims of Munich Olympics Massacre Honored in Rio

'This is an extremely emotional moment for us, one we have been waiting for since 1972,' Yossef Romano's widow says.


More than four decades after they were held hostage and then murdered, the 11 Israeli victims of the 1972 Munich Olympics massacre were commemorated…


A “moment of reflection” for the Munich 11 will be held during the Games’ closing ceremony on Aug. 21.


In addition to the IOC commemorations, an August 14 ceremony for the Israeli 11 at Rio City Hall will feature the widows of weightlifter Yossef Romano — who was kidnapped, castrated and murdered by the terrorists…


(Kudos to Thomas Bach, of Germany, who became IOC president in September 2013.)


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Pirke Avoth Perek 2 Mishnah 17


“Scripture teaches that if a stranger violates a betrothed maiden in a populated area, both are considered guilty and punishable by death: he, because he violated a woman who was already legally married; and she, because she did not scream for help. (being in a populated area, had she screamed, someone would surely have heard and come to the rescue.)


If Israel and the Torah are betrothed, and we see, day in and day out, how the mitzvoth are violated, our most sacred traditions desecrated, we are surely guilty if we do not scream for help; if we do not protest these violations, if we do not cry out and attempt to prevent these outrages. This is our obligation if we are ‘betrothed’ to the Torah.”


Question: Does this apply to helping the Yazidis as well as ourselves?




If children are not introduced to music at an early age, I believe something fundamental is actually being taken from them.

(Luciano Pavarotti)


Some people think music education is a privilege, but I think it’s essential to being human.

(Jewel)


20% of kids learn to play music.

70% of adults wish they had.

Music Unlocks Self-expression Intelligence Creativity




LODZER SERIES EXPLORES VARIOUS FACETS OF JEWISH MUSIC

Canadian Jewish News - CJN - August 9, 2016 - by Ruth Schweitzer (Aug. 5, 2016)


… (exploring) the diversity of Jewish music, from cantorial, klezmer and popular Israeli songs to the Jewish music of the Middle East and North Africa.


The series is a tribute to the synagogue’s founders, Holocaust survivors from Lodz, Poland,...


(The Lodzer’s cantor, Marcel Cohen,) said music can aid in bridging the generational gaps between Holocaust survivors, their children and their grandchildren.


“Music has a powerful effect on people, and it’s been 70-plus years since the Second World War, so it’s not fresh in anyone’s mind,” Cohen said. “As they get older and see their children and grandchildren, they would like to see that the Jewish community is vibrant. Music has a powerful influence on bridging the cultural gap, the generational gap, and I think that if they can sing and clap and dance to the same music, then that brings a certain amount of comfort and joy to the survivors.”


(Read the full article at the link above)




Quotes of the Day - Abraham Joshua Heschell

“Self-respect is the root of discipline: The sense of dignity grows
with the ability to say no to oneself.”

“Our goal should be to live life in radical amazement. ....get up in the morning and look at the world in a way that takes nothing for granted. Everything is phenomenal; everything is incredible; never treat life casually. To be spiritual is to be amazed.”




Biography - Jews who changed how we look at everything   (Thanks Zalman)

Carl Sagan (1934 - 1996)

American astronomer, cosmologist, astrophysicist, and astrobiologist.


He was the most famous science communicator of the 20th century. Author - Cosmos & The Pale Blue Dot. He influenced astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson who narrated the 2nd Cosmos TV series.




Haimishe Humour - (By Frank White and his lovely associate)

The lecture was on the topic  Gematria - a process of assigning numerical values to Hebrew words and names.  

The learned Rabbi began, "when it comes to Gematria, there are three types of people:
those who get it and those who don't.”



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Why I’m not fasting on Tisha B’Av
August 4, 2016, 9:00 pm 22

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RABBI ELYSE GOLDSTEIN


Next week, the Jewish people will be marking a day of national tragedy — Tisha B’Av — the destruction of the First and Second Temples. Those destructions also marked the end of the priesthood and the sacrificial system. The end of the supposed “unity” of a people with one national shrine, one national ritual, one national way of worshiping. I am a rabbi. I won’t be fasting.


All during my teenage years, I fasted on Tisha B’av because it fell during summer camp, and Reform summer camps always had us doing some meaningful role-play or activity as if we were there, right there as the walls of Jerusalem were breached. Later, as a unit head, I helped create those melodramas and watched as the kids would cry and inevitably turn Tisha B’Av into a Holocaust Remembrance Day because the destruction of the Temple was ancient history to them.

During rabbinical school, I fasted, frankly, to be holier-than-thou, more religious than my newly-traditional right-leaning classmates.
As a young rabbi I fasted to be a role model of a Reform Jew who took Jewish history seriously.


But I don’t fast anymore.
Why? Aren’t I sad about all that loss?


I’m not fasting because the oldest symbol of that so-called “unity” — the Western Wall — is a battleground for religious pluralism, and I imagine that if the kohanim were still around, they would be on the side of the Haredim, not on the side of those women who, like me, want to be full participating Jews there with tallit, tefillin, and Torah.


I’m not fasting because I’m afraid of what it would look like for women if we actually rebuilt the Temple.


And I’m not fasting because, ultimately, the destruction of the Temple lent way for the democratization of Judaism, wresting power and authority out of the hands of an elite and corrupt priesthood and placing it in the hands of scholars, and then rabbis, who represent the people. Eventually in our day, all Jews have the authority to be their own priests, to hold holiness in their own hands, to read their own Psalms as they ascend the stairs of their synagogue, to lead their own prayers, and even to make their own halachic decisions. I celebrate that democratization. It doesn’t make me sad, even though my husband and sons are kohanim and would, in the time of the messiah, be those powerful priests again. (And I’d get to eat from their terumah as the wife of a priest. As a vegetarian, it doesn’t appeal to me. As a feminist, I don’t want to eat their leftovers.) I don’t mourn the loss of a hierarchical, inherited caste of priests — I would, however, mourn the loss of democracy.


In a way, the very existence of the rabbis and the Talmud undermined the Temple. To rebuild the Temple would undermine the existence of an interpretive Judaism. The Pharisees won in the end, and interpretation won too over the fixed, hegemonic ritual of the Sadducees.


And I’m not fasting because I believe we are already living in the third period, in the time of the sovereign nation of Israel, and though the Temple doesn’t exist anymore, Israel certainly does. I am a Zionist. I don’t mourn the loss of our sovereignty, because we finally got it back. I feel blessed to live in the era of the “flowering of the seeds of our redemption.” With all its faults, still, Israel is the living reality of a people who couldn’t have imagined it in 68 CE — but I don’t have to dream it or long for it, because it’s as real as my right hand. Fasting on Tisha B’Av almost seems like a slap in the face to that sovereign Jewish nation. I want to imagine that if the Rabbis of the Talmud were living today, they’d say, “what? How can you keep a fast that longs for a nation you are living in now?”


To be sure, there are Jewish groups who “re-imagine” Tisha B’Av. It becomes about the Spanish Inquisition or the Holocaust or about personal loss, or a day of brokenness and sadness. That’s the way we modern Jews try and make sense of a fast day that doesn’t speak to those who do not feel as if they are “in exile.” Jewish history has plenty of trauma and we can certainly use a day to remember that. But remember: from the ashes of the Temple rose the phoenix of rabbinic Judaism, and that’s the Judaism I now celebrate, the Judaism that survived.


No, I won’t be going out to a fancy restaurant. I’m not going to eat a luxurious meal on my front porch. I’m not going to put down anyone who is fasting. But I will be spending the day reflecting on how to build a Judaism based on pluralistic, democratic values; a Judaism strong enough to survive into the future without needing one “unified” way of being Jewish.
While we are mourning the destruction of a mythical “unity” — one we never had, with the infighting of the Pharisees and Saducees, Essenes and Zealots to name a few — we are blinded to the reality of destructive narratives in both Israel and the Diaspora today. A corrupt male priesthood still exists in the form of a chief rabbinate. Social castes still abound. The destruction of the Temple should be a metaphor for the destruction of all that really divides us. Now, without a Temple burning, those destructive forces are turning inward.


There is a midrash in Avot deRebbe Natan (4:5) about Rabbi Yochanan ben Zakkai walking in Jerusalem with his student Rabbi Yehoshua. They see the ruins of the Temple and Rabbi Yehoshua says “Woe to us, that this place where the sins of Israel were atoned for is destroyed.” Rabbi Yochanan ben Zakkai answers, “My son, do not fear. We have another atonement which replaces it: gemilut chasadim, deeds of lovingkindness.”


The Rabbis in the Yerushalmi (Yoma 1:1) say the Temple was destroyed because people loved money and hated each other. If we were really sad about the destruction of the Temple, we’d be living much differently today. We’d be living with abundant gemilut chasadim and much less sinat hinam — gratuitous hatred. Otherwise the empty stomachs will be like when I was a teenager in summer camp: just for show.




Ignorance in the rank and file of the Green Party of Canada

(The Green Party of Canada supports) Palestinian Self-Determination and the Movement for Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions.


...Israel (must) implement a permanent ban on further settlement construction in the Occupied Palestinian Territories, and enter into good faith negotiations with representatives of the Palestinian people for the purpose of establishing a viable, contiguous and truly sovereign Palestinian state.


...the Green Party of Canada opposes all efforts to prohibit, punish or otherwise deter expressions of support for BDS.

===


This is homegrown Canadian antisemitism. People/Jews who vote for the Green party should know their policies.


BDS is antisemitism. Sieg Heil to the new Green Party. Elizabeth May has become the lame duck leader of the GPC. Her minions are in control.


(Read the printed bulletin this Shabbat for “Globe and Mail” and “National Post” commentaries.)


The bulletin doesn't cover antisemitism outside of Canada.



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Daily Minyan

Sunday – Friday: 9:00 am

We alternate with Beth Radom

on Sunday - check the schedule

posted on the side door.

Run by Arthur Zins

includes Breakfast following.


Come Daven, Fress & Schmooze,

then join in on a walk.


Saturdays: Shabbat Service

Birkot ha-Shachar 9:12 AM

 - (Led by Frank Steiman)
Yishtabach 9:30 AM

includes Kiddush Luncheon


Cemetery plots for sale to members in good standing (three years minimum).

If you are a member (3 years or more) and want to buy a plot, the cost per plot is $2500.

If you know anyone wanting a plot - the person can pay three years' membership dues and then be entitled to buy a plot.

This is an opportunity to purchase before prices increase.

Please call Sarah Senior, Lodzer Office Administrator,

for more information and to order:  416-636-6665


Contributions

Please consider sponsoring a kiddush, or contributing to the building, programming, or any specific interest fund, by phoning the shul office at

416-636-6665


Lodzer committee

members needed!

Help is always needed at the shul. Volunteer for a committee – you’ll be appreciated! Just call the office – 416-636-6665 and put your name in. The committee Chairperson will contact you.

Help us get the word out

Share the bulletin!

Lodzer Sisterhood Cookbooks

Great Gifts – just $20 each

Contact the Office at

416-636-6665

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Tree of Life or Seat Plaques

Remember family and friends by purchasing a leaf on our tree of life or a sanctuary seat plaque. Call the office at

416-636-6665.


Chesed Committee

Please call the shul office if you need support or if you know of one of our members who may need support. It remains confidential.

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Office Hours

Monday through Thursday

9 am - 1 pm and 2 pm - 4 pm

Friday

9 am to 1 pm

Executive

Jeff Shabes, President

Harvey Storm

Jonathan Usher

Morry Nosak

Marilyn Richmond                                

Board Members

Joe Ber

Henry Epstein

Roz Greene

Judy Hazen

Rafi Remez

Frank Steiman

Arnie Yudell


Honourary Member

Leon Pasternak


Rabbi Eli Courante

Cantor Marcel Cohen

B’aal Koreh:

Harvey Bitterman

Gabbai: Arnie Yudell

Bulletin Editor:

Jonathan Usher

e-Bulletin:

Charles Greene

Office Manager:

Sarah Senior


Website:

Who we are - Contact Info

Memberships

Bar and Bat Mitzvahs

High Holy Days 2016

Rabbi’s Corner


Shabbat Bulletin

For submissions/feedback:

lodzercongregation@gmail.com


Lodzer Office

For all business related e-mail:

lodzercentre@rogers.com




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