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THE LODZER SYNAGOGUE

Shabbat Bulletin - August 6, 2016




Make shul and Judaism an important part of your lifestyle

FREDA KON IN LODZ -  August 6th, D’var Torah.
Freda Kon will talk about her experiences in the Lodz Ghetto.




Shalom from Royal Castle Square, Warsaw

Rabbi Eli

“Where in the world is Rabbi Eli?”


This was my guess - The mountains of the Caucasus  (our Rabbi gets around)

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The Caucasus is probably the least travelled region of the former Soviet Union. Minorities fighting for independence, the Nagorno-Karabakh conflict and the recent wars between Russia and Georgia leave the impression that the Caucasus is a dangerous region. This fear is probably justified for some parts of the region like Dagestan, Chechnya (both in Russia) and South Ossetia. Azerbaijan, Georgia, Armenia and even Nagorno-Karabakh are generally very safe countries however, so this is no reason for not going to the Caucasus. We really enjoyed our journey and recommend a trip to the Caucasus to all our readers.  (story)



Sunday, August 7th 1-3 p.m. - in the Event Hall of our Shul


Project Abraham -  Meeting in support of the Yezidis

The current plight of the Yezidis of Iraq and Syria is reminiscent of the plight of the Jews during the Holocaust.  Yezidis who have not already been killed, forcibly converted, or enslaved are in hiding and desperately trying to reach safer shores.  Refugee camps are not safe for Yezidis and identifying oneself as such inside or outside of the camps is dangerous.  As a result, children in hiding aren’t being sent to school nor can families have access to medical care since either activity would require them to make their religion known.  Canadian Yezidis are living with constant anxiety over the fate of their loved ones and are desperate to bring them here.


Once numbering twenty-three million a few centuries ago, continual genocides against the peaceful Yezidis  have reduced their numbers to under one million today and that number is quickly declining as this newest genocide takes countless numbers of lives.  This is a people who are close to becoming extinct if the world doesn't do something to help them thrive.  
Project Abraham is an initiative of The Mozuud Freedom Foundation dedicated to assist the Yazidi community of Canada to rescue Yazidis facing genocide in the Middle East. The Yezidi are sympathetic to Israel and join the Jewish community in pro-Israel demonstrations and lectures, especially here in the GTA.  

Project Abraham has monthly meetings with it's growing numbers of volunteers to bring them up-to-date on the latest news and activities.  Thanks to the kindness of the Lodzer board of directors,  meetings will now be held at the Lodzer Synagogue for the remainder of 2016.
A warm invitation is being given to all members of Lodzer who would like to learn more about this initiative.  Our next meeting takes place on Sunday, August 7th from 1 - 3 pm. in the upper hall.  Please feel free to join us.

Debbie Rose
Coordinator/Project Abraham
www.mozuud.org
bdebrose@rogers.com




The Lodzer Congregation - YIZKOR BOOK 2016 - 2017

This year’s Yizkor Book will be published for use during the High Holy Days 2016 and Yizkor Services throughout 2017.  Take this opportunity to remember your loved ones by having their names inscribed in our Annual Yizkor Book.  
Please call 416-636-6665, or drop by the Synagogue office.  
The deadline for receipt of dedications is September 12, 2016.




High Holy Days 2016


Dear Members:
High Holiday time is upon us once more.


You may reserve by coming directly to the shul office, by telephone or by mailing or emailing back the form you received to lodzercentre@rogers.com


We wish to stress the importance of your immediate response, if you want to reserve your High Holiday seats.  There’s no guarantee of the same seats as in prior years due to seating plan changes.


All unreserved seats will go on sale to the public August 22, 2016.


FAMILY SERVICES – DOWNSTAIRS SANCTUARY (LIMITED SEATING)
LEADER:  ARLENE MOSHE

(Main service tickets sold separately.)


For pricing and additional information.


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Birthdays


Aug. 4  Allan Hoffer
Aug. 5  Irene Szweras

Aug. 7    Sonia Goldlust
Aug. 10  Rachel Weisman
Aug. 12  Honey Hellreich
Aug. 12  Sheila Stahl


Anniversaries

July 30  Gerald & Leila Young

Aug. 10  Robert & Sally Berger
Aug. 10  Sidney & Barbara Lew
Aug. 10  Harvey & Helen Storm

Yahrzeits


July 30  Frida Nadler, mother of Sam
Aug. 2   Pepi Mozes, wife of Marcel
Aug. 2   Lola Zaidman,

            mother of Leo Zaidman and Sally Berger
Aug. 3  David gould, husband of Helen
Aug. 3  Jack Manley, father of Neil
Aug. 4  Sadie Applebaum,

            mother of Sheilah Solomon

Aug. 7    Leo Kon, husband of Freda

              and father of Lily Silver Markowitz
Aug. 7    Harry Markowitz, father of Sydney
Aug. 7    Bernard Steiman, brother of Frank
Aug. 8    Hava Lea Sosner, mother of Sarah Moshe
Aug. 11  Louis Slutchuk, father of Nancy Corey
Aug. 12  Gary Dorchik, husband of Milla,

               father of Suzan Dorchik and Lisa Gold
Aug. 12  Annie Hercberg, mother of Helen Storm




Quotes of the Day - Abraham Joshua Heschel

When I was young, I admired clever people.

Now that I am old, I admire kind people.

Self-respect is the fruit of discipline;

the sense of dignity grows with the ability to say no to oneself.



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Wednesdays

7:30-8:30 pm

Parsha of The Week

(POW)

with Judy Hazan



POW returns Sept. 7

Enjoy the Summer!


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Join this lively group every Wednesday night at 7:30 PM at The Lodzer where we study the week’s sedra together. Classes are informal and no prior knowledge or preparation is required. The purpose of the class is to learn the story of the parsha, determine its most important elements and tie its morals and lessons into our daily lives. This is open to the public and there is no cost.

For more information contact:

Judy Hazan 416-704-1693


Shabbat

after the kiddush

Pirke Avoth

Discussion Group

with Jonathan Usher


Every shabbat, after the kiddush there is a vibrant discussion of one Mishnah of Pirke Avoth.


“Welcome everyone with joy”


Friday,

August 5

1 Av


Rosh Chodesh

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(DB, 12 years ago.)

Saturday,

August 6

2 Av


Birkot

ha-Shachar

9:12 AM

Led by

Frank Steiman


Yishtabach

9:30 AM

Kiddush Lunch


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This week’s Kiddush is

co-sponsored by:


Freda Kon,

Syd & Lily Markowitz


for the yahrzeits of


Leo Kon

And

Harry Markowitz



Freda Kon will talk about her

experiences in the

Lodz Ghetto.

Torah Times

Torah Reading: Triennial Year 3

Parashat Massey

Numbers
1: 33:50 - 34:15 (p. 716)
2: 34:16 - 34:29
3: 35:1 - 35:8
4: 35:9 - 35:15
5: 35:16 - 35:29
6: 35:30 - 35:34
7: 36:1 - 36:13
maftir:  36:10 - 36:13


Haftarah: Jeremiah

2: 4 - 28; 4: 1 - 2 (pg. 725)


Candle Lighting: 8:16 p.m. – Friday

Havdalah: 9:23 p.m. – Saturday









Sunday,

August 7

1 - 3 PM


Lodzer

Event Hall



Ignore the

plight of

others at

your own

peril.



Project Abraham


Meeting in support of

the Yezidis


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Yazidi women:

Slaves of the Caliphate

STOP THE SLAUGHTER:

THEY'RE TAKING OUR HOMES,

OUR WOMEN AND OUR LIVES


While we sleep peacefully in our beds,


the Yazidi people of Iraq and Syria are being driven from their homes, the men and boys crucified and killed, while the women and children are raped and enslaved.


Those who manage to escape have become refugees within Iraq, Syria, Jordan and abroad.

Saturday,

August 13

9 Av


Birkot

ha-Shachar

9:12 AM

Led by

Frank Steiman


Yishtabach

9:30 AM

Kiddush Lunch



To sponsor a Kiddush

please call the office

416-636-6665





Tisha B'Av Service at Lodzer       
                
Starting with Mincha

at 8:15 p.m.

Sunday,

August 14

10 Av


Tisha B'Av Service at Lodzer


9 a.m.

Why Is Tisha B'Av

Important For Israel?


As we go about our daily lives, how important is it to recall the painful destruction that the Jewish people have endured time and time again?

Is there a way to translate this memory of the past into action for the future?

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Sunday,

August 21

7 PM

Lodzer

Centre

Congregation


12 Heaton St.

416-636-6665

All classes are on Sunday at 7 pm:

Free of charge.

Donations are welcome.

Refreshments will be served following

each presentation.


This project is funded

In part by the

Government of Canada

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The History of Klezmer Music.


Presentation by:

Raisa and Viktor Orshansky

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Sunday,

August 28

7 PM

Lodzer

Centre

Congregation


12 Heaton St.

416-636-6665

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"Where Does that Tune

Come From?"


The Musical Origin of Popular Jewish Melodies.


Presentation by:

Charles Heller

Sunday,

September 11

7 PM

Lodzer

Centre

Congregation


12 Heaton St.

416-636-6665

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The Yiddish Theatre.


Presentation by:

Faye Kellerstein



Thursday,

September 15

7:30 PM

Shul

Book Chat

with Cathy Zeldin


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Some News About Book Chat

Book Chat is moving to Thursdays at 7:30 pm at the Lodzer and we'll meet every 6 weeks.

Since the High Holidays begin erev October 2, we can start to meet again in mid- September.

Our first book is "The Illegal" by Lawrence Hill on September 15.

Our next book will be "Pumpkin Flowers" by Matti Friedman on October 27.  There's time to get it from the library before then and it is well worth the read; recommended by the Jewish Book Council.

We can begin to choose future books as a group at our September 15 meeting.

I hope everyone is having a fantastic summer!

Sunday,

September 18

7 PM

Lodzer

Centre

Congregation


12 Heaton St.

416-636-6665

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Jewish Music of North Africa.


Presentation by:

Cantor Aaron Bensoussan



Today’s ‘Spotlight’ features

Cantor Bensoussan’s story.


Sunday,

September 25


Yizkor

Service


10:30 AM


Michael Levitt

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mlevitt.liberal.ca

Lodzer Annual Yizkor Service


Guest Speaker: Michael Levitt


The Soul Lives On

The essence of every human life is the soul. After death, the soul lives on. Yizkor is about life, death and eternity; about the core mission we all share to bring light, life, kindness and goodness into this often dark and cruel world; about the transcendent bond and timeless connection between you and someone you loved, and still do. Yizkor is far more than a ritual or prayer. Yizkor is a gift from your soul in this world, to the soul of your loved one, in the next world.


Rosh Hashanah


Sunday eve, Oct. 2 , 2016, and Monday and Tuesday all day Oct.3, 2016 and Oct. 4, 2016.

The Jewish New Year

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Yom Kippur


Tuesday eve, Oct 11,
2016, and Wed., all day Oct. 12, 2016.

Kol Nidre and Day of Atonement

(fast and break the fast)


Sukkot


Sunday eve, Oct 16, 2016, and Monday and Tuesday all day, Oct. 17,  and Oct. 18, 2016

Feast of Tabernacles

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Hoshanah Rabah and
Shmini Atzeret


Sunday, Oct 23, 2016
Monday, Oct.24, 2016 and Yizkor

Eighth Day of Assembly


Simchat Torah


Monday eve, Oct. 24 and all day Tuesday, Oct 25, 2016

Day of Celebrating the Torah

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Thursday,

October 27

7:30 PM

Shul

Book Chat

with Cathy Zeldin

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"Pumpkin Flowers" by Matti Friedman.

It is well worth the read; recommended by the Jewish Book Council.

The hill, in Lebanon, was called the Pumpkin; "flowers" was the military code word for casualties.


Part memoir, part reportage, part history, Friedman’s powerful narrative captures the birth of today s chaotic Middle East and the rise of a twenty-first-century type of war in which there is never a clear victor and media images can be as important as the battle itself.

Sunday,

October 30

7 PM

Lodzer

Centre

Congregation


12 Heaton St.

416-636-6665

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The Jewish Role in Jazz

and the

Israeli Jazz Scene.


Presentation by:

Reuven Grajner


Sunday,

November 6

7 PM

Lodzer

Centre

Congregation


12 Heaton St.

416-636-6665

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The Golden Age of Cantorial Music.


Presentation by:

Cantor David Nemtzov

Sunday,

November 20

7 PM

Lodzer

Centre

Congregation


12 Heaton St.

416-636-6665

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Jewish Music of The Middle East:

Part One.


Presentation by:

Cantor Aaron Bensoussan



Sunday,

November 27

7 PM

Lodzer

Centre

Congregation


12 Heaton St.

416-636-6665

All classes are on Sunday at 7 pm:

Free of charge.

Donations are welcome.

Refreshments will be served following

each presentation.


This project is funded

In part by the

Government of Canada

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Jewish Music of Eastern Europe.


Presentation by:

Raisa and Viktor Orshansky

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Sunday,

December 4

7 PM

Lodzer

Centre

Congregation


12 Heaton St.

416-636-6665

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Jewish Music of The Middle East:

Part Two.


Presentation by:

Cantor Aaron Bensoussan

Sunday,

December 18

7 PM

Lodzer

Centre

Congregation


12 Heaton St.

416-636-6665

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Israeli Music.


Presentation by:

Cantor David Edwards





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א שיקסע ביי א רב קאן אוך פסקוען שאלות.


A shikseh bei a rov ken oich paskenen sheiles.


In the Rabbi's home, even the gentile maid can decide halachic questions.


Metaphorical meaning: One learns from one's environment.


In The Sources: Rabbi Gamliel said to the Sages: " My slave is a scholar and he knows that slaves are exempt from the laws of the Sukkah. That is why he sleeps under the bed. (Sukkah 20b).

                                                          ..................................


דער ווארעמ אין כריין , מיינו אז סיאיז נישטא בעסערס.


Der vorem  in chrein, meint az s'iz nishto besser.


As blissful as a worm in horseradish.


Metaphorical meaning: Ignorance is bliss.


In The Sources: The worst thing about Israel's exile in Egypt was that they no longer felt that they were in exile. (Commentary to Shemot 6:6).



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What does Pirke Avoth say about the evil eye?

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Pirke Avoth Perek 2 Mishnah 16


Rabbi Joshua said: An evil eye, the evil inclination, and hatred of people remove man from the world.


“… a person possessing an ‘evil eye’ is one who is seriously perturbed at seeing the ‘other fellow’ successful, prosperous or even alive.”


This parsha says nothing about the effectiveness of an “evil eye”  or how to avoid it. It talks about how the evil eye is detrimental to the person who has the evil eye.


“pooh, pooh, pooh”

“mir zollen nit farnayen der saychel”

“The world functions according to its own rules”




“The Jewish culture - people that are Jewish have a certain cultural habit that they've formed and one of those habits is an appreciation of theater and music - these are cultural things one does associate with values that are promulgated by Jewish families. I think that's a good thing.”

(Woody Allen)




Spotlight on “Sundays at 7 PM” - A Series on Jewish Music

September 18th - Jewish Music of North Africa
Presenter - Cantor Aaron Bensoussan


Cantor Bensoussan was born in 1954
Scion of an illustrious family in the history of Moroccan Sephardi Jewry and equally versed both traditional Moroccan and Ashkenazi hazzanut, Aaron Bensoussan is a well-known contemporary cantor and recording artist.

Born in Mogador (now Essaouira, near Agadir), Morocco, Cantor Aaron Bensoussan is the scion of an illustrious family in the history of Moroccan Sephardi Jewry. His paternal grandfather, Rabbi Hayyim David Bensoussan, was the Chief Dayan (rabbi and rabbinical judge) of Morocco, and his great-grandfather, Rabbi Avraham Bensoussan, also a dayan as well as a kabbalist, is thought to have been a direct descendant of the medieval rabbi Yehuda ben Soussan, who reputedly was a teacher of Moses Maimonides. Avraham Bensoussan is still remembered among Jews of Moroccan background as one of the most revered rabbis to emerge from the city of Fez.


Aaron Bensoussan displayed musical interests and gifts at an early age. He began learning liturgical modes and melodies of piyyutim (liturgical poems) from his father, and while he was still a youngster, he prevailed upon his parents to organize studies on the oud (an Arabic type of lute) with a well-known master of the instrument. In the aftermath of Israel’s victory in the Six-Day War in 1967, his parents—concerned for the future of Moroccan Jewry in an Arab nation that had been nominally allied with Israel’s enemies—sent him to America, where his older brother was already living.


Bensoussan attended several prestigious yeshivot (talmudic academies) of the Orthodox world in America, with the initial aim of becoming a rabbi. But he developed a fascination with traditional Ashkenazi hazzanut (cantorial art) and familiarized himself with the recordings of many of the legendary cantors. When he decided to change course and pursue cantorial studies, he was accepted by the Cantors Institute (now the H. L. Miller Cantorial School) of the Jewish Theological Seminary. There, he studied with such great masters of hazzanut as David Kusevitsky and Max Wohlberg, and he received his ordination in 1986. “They took a rough diamond and put some polish on it,” he remarked ten years later. Meanwhile, in order to safeguard his precious Moroccan Sephardi musical heritage against the unavoidable forces of acculturation and exposure to the very different sounds of Ashkenazi tradition, Rabbi Morton M. Leifman, the dean of the school, organized private tutorial courses (almost as a condition for his acceptance), in which Bensoussan recorded for posterity the intricate modalities, patterns, and tunes of his family’s traditions. Under the guidance of Dr. Neil Levin, who had joined the faculty the same year Bensoussan entered the school (1982), these traditions were analyzed and in some cases notated. Bensoussan is thus a unique phenomenon among today’s cantors—equally versed in both traditions and able to program them in a single concert while retaining the integrity of each. “Even though I feel very comfortable with the Ashkenazi ritual and with Ashkenazi hazzanut,” he remarked in a 1999 interview in London, “I still have that Moroccan in me that wants to go back to its tradition.”


Bensoussan has served three important pulpits since his ordination and has been the cantor of Congregation Beth Emeth Bais Yehuda in Toronto since 1999. He has appeared as guest cantor and as a soloist in concerts throughout North and South America, Europe, Israel, and Australia. Before the fall of the Iron Curtain and the disintegration of the Soviet Union, he went to Moscow as a representative of the American Society for the Advancement of Cantorial Arts to lead services in the Moscow Choral Synagogue, and he also gave concerts in Romania and Yugoslavia. He was one of the soloists at the concert at the Mann Auditorium in Tel Aviv commemorating the twenty-fifth anniversary of the death of the cantorial giant Moshe Koussevitzky.


Bensoussan’s concert repertoire comprises masterpieces of Ashkenazi cantorial tradition, Sephardi liturgical expressions and improvisations in a uniquely virtuoso style, classics from the Ladino and Judeo-Moroccan literature, and his own compositions, which lean heavily on his North African Sephardi heritage. In the early 1990s, together with Greek-born Cantor Alberto Mizrahi and Gerard Edery, he founded the trio Sons of Sefarad—an ensemble that has performed extensively in the United States and abroad, offering innovative programs of Sephardi music.


During his tenure in Toronto, Bensoussan has composed many songs to liturgical, para-liturgical, and secular Sephardi texts. Many of these combine Ashkenazi and Sephardi elements set against a tapestry of Near Eastern rhythms, flamenco, and even jazz. Among the nine recordings to his credit as of 2008 are East and West; Sepharad 92, a commemoration of the 500th anniversary of the expulsion of the Jews from Spain; Joyous Chants, an orchestrally accompanied selection of piyyutim; and Keter-Zohar, a fusion of jazz and Near Eastern music on the Knitting Factory–Jewish Alternative Movement (JAM) label, with jazz pianist Uri Caine.

In 1999 Bensoussan, as a solo artist with the New York–based Schola Hebraeica men’s chorus, toured England as part of the Sacred Music Village—a multifaith international festival of liturgical music. And in 2001 he performed at London’s Bevis Marks Synagogue on the occasion of its 300th anniversary.
(Neil W. Levin)




Biography - Jews who changed how we look at everything   (Thanks Zalman)

Stephen Jay Gould - (1941 - 2002)

Palaeontologist, evolutionary biologist and historian of science.


Wrote, “Wonderful Life - The Burgess Shale and nature of History.” Gould is known for his work on the evolutionary process of life.




Haimishe Humour - (By Frank White and his lovely limping associate)

The inherent dangers of telling a Jewish joke to a Jewish audience

1.  About one fifth of the listeners have heard it before - and tell you so right away.

2.  One fifth will say that you're telling it wrong.

3.  One fifth will tell you they know a better version of your story.

4.  One fifth will interrupt and proceed to tell you their version which is basically the same but twice as long.

5.  One fifth do not really "get it", but will try to cover up by saying the joke is in bad taste, insensitive to somebody, or downright discriminatory.

But it's still worthwhile when the rest laugh.




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The Power of Speech - Parshas Matos
Posted on July 5, 2002 (5762) By Rabbi Yosef Kalatsky | Series: Beyond Pshat | Torah.org

1. Understanding the Power of Speech
The Torah states, “If a man takes a vow to Hashem or swears an oath to establish a prohibition upon himself, he shall not desecrate (chillul) his word; according to whatever comes from his mouth shall he do.” The Torah teaches us that one’s word is sacred and that if one makes a vow or an oath the ramifications of breaking it are severe. If one violates his oath, he is subject to the court-imposed penalty of lashes. We see from this that our speech is powerful and binding.


There are many mitzvahs, which require verbalization. For example the mitzvos of the recitation of the Shema, daily Tefillah, (prayer -Amidah), Berchas HaMazon (Grace after meals), etc. all require one to verbalize them in order to fulfill one’s obligation. If one only mediated the Shema or did not verbalize the Amidah one does not fulfill his obligation. If one wants to make a vow or an oath one also needs to articulate it in order for it to take affect. Thinking a vow or an oath without verbalization has no value whatsoever and therefore is not binding.


Regarding, Lashon Hara (Evil Speech) and Rechilus (Tale Bearing) one usually violates it when he verbalizes his criticisms of others when they have no constructive value. The Gemara in Tractate Arachin states, “The magnitude of the sin of one who speaks lashon hara is more serious than one who violates three cardinal sins.” Meaning that there is a certain aspect of evil, which lies within Lashan Hara, which is more serious. The Gemara in Tractate Shevuos tells that if one violates his vows, one of the possible ramifications of this transgression is that his wife and children could pass away. We see from this passage of the Gemara that if one violates his speech in these contexts the consequences could be tragic (G-d forbid). What lies in the power of speech that makes it so potent?


The only species that has the ability to speak and express their intellect is the human being. The Torah tells us that G-d said to His heavenly retinue,” Let us create Man in our image and form.” The Torah continues and says “G-d blew into Man’s nostrils a Soul of life, thus becoming a living creature.” Targum Unkolus (Aramaic translation of Unkolus) explains the meaning of “living creature” means “a speaking spirit”. We see from the Torah that Man’s ability to express himself through speech is only as a result of the infusion of a soul. Therefore speech is an expression of our spirituality. The essence of the human being is a spiritual species contained within a physical body.


Regarding vows, the Torah states,” he shall not desecrate (chillul) his word”. Evidently, the inference of the word “desecrate” indicates that there is an aspect of sacredness to one’s speech. Therefore violating one’s word is considered a desecration. Now we can understand that if one expends the power of speech inappropriately such as Lashan Hara and Rechilus or if one violates his vow or oath the consequences are dire.


If the power of speech is an outgrowth of our spirituality it is clear and understood that it must be invested in areas of our spirituality. Therefore in order to fulfill our obligation of the Shema it is not sufficient to mediate it but rather it must be declared verbally. In terms of affecting our spirituality and the spirituality of the world, verbal expression is needed. As the Torah tells us, G-d created existence through verbal expression. The Torah states, “G-d said, ‘Let there be light'” etc. As the Mishna in Pirke Avos tells us, existence came about through the “Ten Utterances” of G-d”. Just as existence manifested itself only through the power of G-d’s speech, so too to be effective as spiritual beings we must express our obligations through the articulation of our speech.


Reb. Chaim of Volozin z’tl in the Nefesh HaChaim explains that the word Chillul comes from the word Challal that means “void or vacuum”. He explains that a Chillul Hashem is when we behave as if Hashem is absent from this existence. When one publicly violates Hashem’s Will it is considered a Chillul Hashem because the person is conducting himself as if Hashem did not exist (G-d forbid). We see that the Torah uses the word Chillul regarding violating one’s vow – “he shall not desecrate (chillul) his word”. It is possible that the Torah means that when one violates his vow it is also as if G-d does not exist for that person because violating his word is not recognizing that his power of speech emanates from his spirituality. If a person would only understand the value of speech he would be more cognizant regarding its expenditure. One would pray differently and express himself in a more responsible manner.




Letter to the Editor

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Re: The July 6th meeting with Rabbi Menken.


Rabbi Menken was brilliant, enjoyable and enlightening with a new idea. He is not Jabotinsky, warning us of the approaching dangers, but provided a new idea on the source of anti-Semitism and a method of fighting anti-Semitism...

---

Edited Letter from Yaakov Menken of the Shofar Project:

Jonathan,

I tremendously appreciate your kind letter.

I truly enjoyed meeting you and the congregants, and you have strengthened my interest in pursuing this venture.

Yours, Yaakov


---


The e-Bulletin will no longer beat you over the head with examples of antisemitism from all over the world, past and present.

Antisemitism that is occurring here in Canada, in the here and now is of great concern and shall not be ignored!




Daily Minyan

Sunday – Friday: 9:00 am

We alternate with Beth Radom

on Sunday - check the schedule

posted on the side door.

Run by Arthur Zins

includes Breakfast following.


Come Daven, Fress & Schmooze,

then join in on a walk.


Saturdays: Shabbat Service

Birkot ha-Shachar 9:12 AM

 - (Led by Frank Steiman)
Yishtabach 9:30 AM

includes Kiddush Luncheon


Cemetery plots for sale to members in good standing (three years minimum).

If you are a member (3 years or more) and want to buy a plot, the cost per plot is $2500.

If you know anyone wanting a plot - the person can pay three years' membership dues and then be entitled to buy a plot.

This is an opportunity to purchase before prices increase.

Please call Sarah Senior, Lodzer Office Administrator,

for more information and to order:  416-636-6665


Contributions

Please consider sponsoring a kiddush, or contributing to the building, programming, or any specific interest fund, by phoning the shul office at

416-636-6665


Lodzer committee

members needed!

Help is always needed at the shul. Volunteer for a committee – you’ll be appreciated! Just call the office – 416-636-6665 and put your name in. The committee Chairperson will contact you.

Help us get the word out

Share the bulletin!

Lodzer Sisterhood Cookbooks

Great Gifts – just $20 each

Contact the Office at

416-636-6665

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Tree of Life or Seat Plaques

Remember family and friends by purchasing a leaf on our tree of life or a sanctuary seat plaque. Call the office at

416-636-6665.


Chesed Committee

Please call the shul office if you need support or if you know of one of our members who may need support. It remains confidential.

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Office Hours

Monday through Thursday

9 am - 1 pm and 2 pm - 4 pm

Friday

9 am to 1 pm

Executive

Jeff Shabes, President

Harvey Storm

Jonathan Usher

Morry Nosak

Marilyn Richmond                                

Board Members

Joe Ber

Henry Epstein

Roz Greene

Judy Hazen

Rafi Remez

Frank Steiman

Arnie Yudell


Honourary Member

Leon Pasternak


Rabbi Eli Courante

Cantor Marcel Cohen

B’aal Koreh:

Harvey Bitterman

Gabbai: Arnie Yudell

Bulletin Editor:

Jonathan Usher

e-Bulletin:

Charles Greene

Office Manager:

Sarah Senior


Website:

Who we are - Contact Info

Memberships

Bar and Bat Mitzvahs

High Holy Days 2016

Rabbi’s Corner


Shabbat Bulletin

For submissions/feedback:

lodzercongregation@gmail.com


Lodzer Office

For all business related e-mail:

lodzercentre@rogers.com




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