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20160723


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^^^ click on the graphic to view the flyer and read the press release ^^^


THE LODZER SYNAGOGUE

Shabbat Bulletin - July 23, 2016




Make shul and Judaism an important part of your lifestyle

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Last week’s kiddush was co-sponsored by

Harvey Bitterman in honour of his father,

Cantor Morris Bitterman.


Morris was greatly liked and respected

in the Toronto Jewish Community.




Shalom from Dubrovnik

Rabbi Eli

“Where in the world is Rabbi Eli?”




Thanks to Nisa and Shirley, this past Shabbat was Hat Day. The women looked lovely in their beautiful hats and the men looked jaunty in theirs.

Everyone had a very good time.


If we could only harness the goodwill that was generated that day,

We could Change the World.


Judy is back at work.

And

Sylvia was welcomed back.


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Faye Kellerstein gave us a passionate and very interesting preview of her presentation on Yiddish theatre to be held on September 11th at the Lodzer Music Festival.

(Faye also wore her fancy hat.)

Faye Kellerstein has been performing in Toronto for over 35 years, and is well-known for her Jewish musical/educational programs at synagogues, Jewish organizations and seniors groups both locally and outside of Toronto, including London, Kitchener, Cleveland and Buffalo. Although Faye specializes in Yiddish song, she also has a large repertoire of Hebrew and Broadway songs.In 2013, Faye won second prize in the Toronto/Thornhill regional area “The Chartwell Senior Star” singing competition. Her 1994 CD of Yiddish Folk and Theatre Songs called “A Feygele Zingt” was nominated for a Juno in 1994, and in 2014, Faye performed at Toronto’s Ashkenaz Festival. A language teacher by profession, specializing in French, English, Hebrew and Yiddish, Faye has also given musical historical lectures at Jewish Book Fair and at The National Library of Canada in Ottawa. At the Miles Nadal JCC, Faye presented a Valentine’s themed musical program in February 2014 entitled “The Most Beautiful Yiddish Love Songs Ever Written.


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Birthdays


July 17  Anna Holtzman
July 19  Shirley Smoskowitz
July 19  Jeff Shabes
July 20  Zenia Rybowski
July 20  Nisa Shedletzky
July 21  Alicia Harris

July 26  Ida Ash
July 29  Avi Barkin


Anniversaries

July 17  Cantor Morris & Sonia Goldlust
July 21  Eytan Broder & Penny Hung

July 23  Sheldon & Marilyn Richmond

Yahrzeits


July 16  Morris Bitterman, father of Harvey
July 16  Irving Gula, brother of Esther Steiman
July 16  Max Lichter, father of Myrna
July 18  Milly Abrahams, mother of Jack
July 19  Barry Gold, husband of Lisa
July 22  Goldie Landis, mother of Lorraine

July 25  Sara Koplowitz, wife of Israel

             and mother of Shirley Smoskowitz
July 27  Elka Richmond, mother of Sheldon
July 27  Esther Storm, mother of Harvey




Michael Levitt | Member of Parliament | York Centre

Sarah has arranged to have Michael Levitt M.P. be our speaker for our Yizkor service on Sept 25th.

Michael Levitt is the Member of Parliament for the riding of York Centre in Toronto. He formerly worked as a partner and Vice President of Business Development for the Benjamin Group.
Michael immigrated to Canada from Scotland with his mother at age thirteen. He received a bachelor’s degree in Political Science from McGill University, and earned a Masters degree in Science and Technology Studies from the University of Edinburgh.
He is a founding member of the Canadian Jewish Political Affairs Committee, a multi-partisan organization dedicated to activating the grassroots Jewish community in the political process.
Michael has been an active volunteer with many non-profits and charities and has served as a board member on the Koffler Centre for the Arts, the Jewish National Fund, Mount Sinai Hospital and other organizations.
In parliament, Michael currently sits on the House Standing Committee on Foreign Affairs and International Development, and is the Chair of the Sub-committee for International Human Rights.  He also serves as the Chair of the Canada-Israel Interparliamentary Group.
Michael is married to Barbi and has two children, Casey age 16 and Jessica age 14.




Quotes of the Day

”Seek out that particular mental attribute which makes you feel most deeply and vitally alive, along with which comes the inner voice which says, ‘This is the real me,’ and when you have found that attitude, follow it.”  (William James)

Pirke Avoth  2, 15

“People who kill time are actually committing suicide on the instalment plan.”




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Wednesdays

7:30-8:30 pm

Parsha of The Week

(POW)

with Judy Hazan



POW returns Sept. 7

Enjoy the Summer!


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Join this lively group every Wednesday night at 7:30 PM at The Lodzer where we study the week’s sedra together. Classes are informal and no prior knowledge or preparation is required. The purpose of the class is to learn the story of the parsha, determine its most important elements and tie its morals and lessons into our daily lives. This is open to the public and there is no cost.

For more information contact:

Judy Hazan 416-704-1693


Shabbat

after the kiddush

Pirke Avoth

Discussion Group

with Jonathan Usher


Every shabbat, after the kiddush there is a vibrant discussion of one Mishnah of Pirke Avoth.


Read Jonathan’s Pirke Avoth Discussion Points for the week at the end of this

Shabbat Bulletin.


Saturday,

July 23

17 Tamuz


Birkot

ha-Shachar

9:12 AM

Led by

Frank Steiman


Yishtabach

9:30 AM

Kiddush Lunch




This week’s Kiddush is sponsored by:


Yona Nadle

in memory of her mother

Dvora Geskin


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Torah Times

Torah Reading: Triennial Year 3

Parashat Balak
1: 23:27-30 (pg. 676)
2: 24:1-9
3: 24:10-13
4: 24:14-19
5: 24:20-25
6: 25:1-6
7: 25:7-9
maftir: 25:7-9 (pg, 681)
Haftarah:

Micah 5:6 - 6:8


Candle Lighting: 8:32 p.m. – Friday

Havdalah: 9:39 p.m. – Saturday

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Saturday,

July 30

24 Tamuz


Birkot

ha-Shachar

9:12 AM

Led by

Frank Steiman


Yishtabach

9:30 AM

Kiddush Lunch


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Let us welcome the new month by wearing our fancy hats.

(Every Sabbath before the new moon)


To sponsor a Kiddush

please call the office

416-636-6665


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Friday,

August 5

1 Av


Rosh Chodesh

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(DB, 16 years ago.)

Saturday,

August 6

2 Av


Birkot

ha-Shachar

9:12 AM

Led by

Frank Steiman


Yishtabach

9:30 AM

Kiddush Lunch



To sponsor a Kiddush

please call the office

416-636-6665



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Sunday,

August 14


10 Av

Tisha B’Av

Why Is Tisha B'Av

Important For Israel?


As we go about our daily lives, how important is it to recall the painful destruction that the Jewish people have endured time and time again?

Is there a way to translate this memory of the past into action for the future?

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Sunday,

August 21

7 PM

Lodzer

Centre

Congregation


12 Heaton St.

416-636-6665

All classes are on Sunday at 7 pm:

Free of charge.

Donations are welcome.

Refreshments will be served following

each presentation.


This project is funded

In part by the

Government of Canada

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The History of Klezmer Music.


Presentation by:

Raisa and Viktor Orshansky

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Sunday,

August 28

7 PM

Lodzer

Centre

Congregation


12 Heaton St.

416-636-6665

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"Where Does that Tune

Come From?"


The Musical Origin of Popular Jewish Melodies.


Presentation by:

Charles Heller

Sunday,

September 11

7 PM

Lodzer

Centre

Congregation


12 Heaton St.

416-636-6665

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The Yiddish Theatre.


Presentation by:

Faye Kellerstein



Thursday,

September 15

7:30 PM

Shul

Book Chat

with Cathy Zeldin


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Some News About Book Chat

Book Chat is moving to Thursdays at 7:30 pm at the Lodzer and we'll meet every 6 weeks.

Since the High Holidays begin erev October 2, we can start to meet again in mid- September.

Our first book is "The Illegal" by Lawrence Hill on September 15.

Our next book will be "Pumpkin Flowers" by Matti Friedman on October 27.  There's time to get it from the library before then and it is well worth the read; recommended by the Jewish Book Council.

We can begin to choose future books as a group at our September 15 meeting.

I hope everyone is having a fantastic summer!

Sunday,

September 18

7 PM

Lodzer

Centre

Congregation


12 Heaton St.

416-636-6665

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Jewish Music of North Africa.


Presentation by:

Cantor Aaron Bensoussan



Sunday,

September 25


Yizkor

Service


10:30 AM


Michael Levitt

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mlevitt.liberal.ca

Lodzer Annual Yizkor Service


Guest Speaker: Michael Levitt


The Soul Lives On

The essence of every human life is the soul. After death, the soul lives on. Yizkor is about life, death and eternity; about the core mission we all share to bring light, life, kindness and goodness into this often dark and cruel world; about the transcendent bond and timeless connection between you and someone you loved, and still do. Yizkor is far more than a ritual or prayer. Yizkor is a gift from your soul in this world, to the soul of your loved one, in the next world.


Rosh Hashanah


Sunday eve, Oct. 2 , 2016, and Monday and Tuesday all day Oct.3, 2016 and Oct. 4, 2016.

The Jewish New Year


Yom Kippur


Tuesday eve, Oct 11,
2016, and Wed., all day Oct. 12, 2016.

Kol Nidre and Day of Atonement

(fast and break the fast)


Sukkot


Sunday eve, Oct 16, 2016, and Monday and Tuesday all day, Oct. 17,  and Oct. 18, 2016

Feast of Tabernacles


Hoshanah Rabah and
Shmini Atzeret


Sunday, Oct 23, 2016
Monday, Oct.24, 2016 and Yizkor

Eighth Day of Assembly


Simchat Torah


Monday eve, Oct. 24 and all day Tuesday, Oct 25, 2016

Day of Celebrating the Torah

Thursday,

October 27

7:30 PM

Shul

Book Chat

with Cathy Zeldin

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"Pumpkin Flowers" by Matti Friedman.

It is well worth the read; recommended by the Jewish Book Council.

The hill, in Lebanon, was called the Pumpkin; "flowers" was the military code word for casualties.


Part memoir, part reportage, part history, Friedman’s powerful narrative captures the birth of today s chaotic Middle East and the rise of a twenty-first-century type of war in which there is never a clear victor and media images can be as important as the battle itself.

Sunday,

October 30

7 PM

Lodzer

Centre

Congregation


12 Heaton St.

416-636-6665

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The Jewish Role in Jazz

and the

Israeli Jazz Scene.


Presentation by:

Reuven Grajner


Sunday,

November 6

7 PM

Lodzer

Centre

Congregation


12 Heaton St.

416-636-6665



Someone, please

Send me

His picture.

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The Golden Age of Cantorial Music.


Presentation by:

Cantor David Nemtzov



Sunday,

November 20

7 PM

Lodzer

Centre

Congregation


12 Heaton St.

416-636-6665

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Jewish Music of The Middle East:

Part One.


Presentation by:

Cantor Aaron Bensoussan



Sunday,

November 27

7 PM

Lodzer

Centre

Congregation


12 Heaton St.

416-636-6665

All classes are on Sunday at 7 pm:

Free of charge.

Donations are welcome.

Refreshments will be served following

each presentation.


This project is funded

In part by the

Government of Canada

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Jewish Music of Eastern Europe.


Presentation by:

Raisa and Viktor Orshansky

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Sunday,

December 4

7 PM

Lodzer

Centre

Congregation


12 Heaton St.

416-636-6665

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Jewish Music of The Middle East:

Part Two.


Presentation by:

Cantor Aaron Bensoussan

Sunday,

December 18

7 PM

Lodzer

Centre

Congregation


12 Heaton St.

416-636-6665

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Israeli Music.


Presentation by:

Cantor David Edwards





Biography - Jews who changed how we look at everything   (Thanks Zalman)

Lawrence Krauss (1954 -  ) Theoretical physicist and cosmologist.

Best known for his book - “A universe from Nothing - Why There is Something rather than Nothing.” Grew up and had a Bar Mitzvah in Toronto - he is now a self-described antitheist. He currently heads the Origins Project at the Arizona State University.

Lise Meitner - {1878 - 1968) - Physicist.

She was part of the Hahn-Meitner-Strassmamm team that discovered nuclear fission of uranium and thorium. Her colleague, Otto hahn was awarded the Nobel Prize & Lise Meitner was overlooked. Nuclear fission and fusion are processes responsible for almost every form of matter in the universe. Element 109 Meitnerium is named in her honour.



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אין א טשאלנט און אין א שידוך, קוקט מען נישט צו פיל אריין.


In a cholent un in a shidduch, kukt men nisht tzu fiel arein.


Don't probe too deeply into a Cholent, or into a potential Shidduch!


Words of our Sages:
When looking for a shidduch, it is impossible to find the perfect match. As long as the main elements are satisfactory, it might be best to yield on secondary matters.
(Rabbi M.M. Shneerson of Lubavitch, the Chabad Rebbe.)
                                                              .....................


מ׳זאגט די טאכטער, און םיםיינט די שנור.


M'zogt die tochter un m'meint die shnur.


It is said to the daughter, but meant for the daughter-in-law.


In The Sources:
"And Moses was angry with Aaron's sons Eleazar and Ithamar " (Vayikra 10.16.)
Although Aaron was also somewhat complicit, out of respect for Aaron, Moses turned his face only to Aaron's sons.



Humour - The Mezuzah

Opening his front door, the Rabbi found himself face to face with the local priest.

"Rabbi, may I have a few words with you?" asked the priest.

"Of course, Father," replied the Rabbi somewhat nervously.

"Rabbi," began the priest, "It must be evident to you that in this town we are plagued by thieves.
Scarcely a day passes without one of my flock coming to me bemoaning the fact that his house has been broken into..

On the other hand, I have noticed that thieves do not bother you Jews much."

"Father, you are correct."

"Yes, but why is that?" inquired the priest.

"Look at this little box here on the side of my door post," said the Rabbi.

"It's called a mezuzah. We Jews believe that when we put a mezuzah on the entrances to our houses, the Holy One, may His Name be blessed, protects both us and our property."
"In that case", replied the priest, "I must have one!"


Not wishing to be the cause of an incipient pogrom, the Rabbi reluctantly handed over a mezuzah to the priest.
Some two weeks later the Rabbi was awakened by the sound of someone pounding violently on his door.
Dressing himself hastily, he made his way down the stairs.

"Who's there?" the Rabbi asked tremulously.
"Open the door! Open the door!" screamed a voice on the other side.
Leaving the door on the chain, the Rabbi cracked the door wide enough to see the priest standing in front of him, his eyes wild with great distraught.
"What happened?" asked the terrified Rabbi. "Were you not protected from robbers?"
"I was! But these people were worse than robbers!" screamed the priest.
"Who?" asked the rabbi.
"Fundraisers!!"




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Parsha of the Week - Balak

General Overview: In this week's Torah reading, Balak, King Balak of Moab retains the sorcerer Balaam to curse the Jewish people. Instead of curses, only blessings come out of his mouth—including prophecies concerning the Messianic redemption. Moabite women entice some of the Israelites to sin, resulting in a plague amongst the Jews. Phinehas zealously kills two of the high-ranking offenders, and the plague comes to an end.

Sorry for Nothing - Parshas Balak
Posted on June 7, 2002 (5758) by Rabbi Mordechai Kamenetzky | Series:
Torah.org

We are all fascinated by inanimate or animal objects that speak. The ’60s had TV viewers kvelling over talking horses, even talking cars. And an entire industry was based on the concept of a talking mouse. But this week a talking animal is no joke. The Torah tells us about a talking animal that brought no laughs to its rider and teaches a serious lesson to us all.
Bilaam, the greatest prophet that the gentile world had seen, was hired by Balak, King of Moab, for one mission: curse the Jews. Bilaam’s feigned reluctance was quickly turned to exuberance when offers of honors and great wealth were added as signing bonus, and first thing in the morning he saddled his trusted donkey and was on his way. He planned to travel to an overlook, where he would cast his spell on the Jewish Nation as they camped innocently beneath the wicked gaze of Balak and his employee, Bilaam, the prophet.


But Hashem had different plans. As Bilaam’s donkey ambled toward a narrow passage, it saw a frightening sight. An angel, with a sword thrust forward, blocked its path. The beast turned off the road into a field, and Bilaam struck the animal to get it back on the road. But again the angel stood in the passageway and the poor donkey, in fear, squeezed tightly against a stone wall, pressing Bilaam’s leg against the wall. The great prophet, who so haughtily straddled the donkey, did not see the angelic figure and reacted violently. Again he hit his donkey; this time harder . But the angel did not retreat. He began approaching the donkey and its rider. Suddenly the donkey crouched in panic, and Bilaam struck it again. But this time the donkey did not act like a mule. She spoke up. Miraculously, Hashem opened her mouth, and she asked Bilaam, “why did you hit me? Aren’t I the same animal that you have ridden your entire life? Should not my strange behavior give cause for concern?” (Numbers 22:28)


When the angel, sword in hand, finally revealed himself, and chided Bilaam for striking the innocent animal, Bilaam was flabbergasted. He was left speechless save for one sentence. “I have sinned, for I did not know that you were standing opposite me on the road. And if you want, I shall return” (Numbers 22:34).


What is disturbing is Bilaam’s immediate admission of sin. If he could not see the angel why did he admit guilt?


Many riders would hit a donkey that presses their foot against the wall or crouches down amidst a group of a king’s officers. Bilaam should have simply stated to the angel, “I did not know you were there and thought my beast was acting in a manner that required discipline.” Why the apology? If he truly did not know that the angel was there, why did he admit to sinning?
On one of the final days of the Six Day War the Israeli troops pierced through enemy fortifications and forged their way through the ancient passageways of Jerusalem. As if Divine gravitational force was pulling them, one group of soldiers dodged the Jordanian bullets and proceeded until there was no reason to continue. They had reached the Kotel HaMaravi, the Western Wall, the holiest place in Judaism, the site of both the First and Second Temples. The young men, some of whom had yeshiva education, others who came from traditional backgrounds, stood in awe and began to cry in unison. The Kotel had been liberated!


One young soldier, who grew up on a totally secular kibbutz in the northern portion of the state gazed at the sight of his comrades crying like children as they stared up at the ancient stones. Suddenly, he, too began to wail.


One of the religious soldiers, who had engaged in countless debates with him, put his arm around him and asked, “I don’t understand. To us the Kotel means so much. It is our link with the Temple and the holy service. This is the most moving experience of our lives. But why are you crying?”


The young soldier looked at his friend, and amidst the tears simply stated, “I am crying because I am not crying.”


Bilaam, the greatest of gentile prophets, realized that something must be wrong. A simple donkey saw the revelation of an angel. He did not. He realized that there are experiences he should have been able to grasp and appreciate. If he didn’t it was not a donkey’s fault. It was not an angel’s fault. It was his fault. He realized then and there that it was he who was lacking.
How often does G-d cry out to us in newspaper headlines, be it earthquakes, wildfires, or human tragedies? We should stare at the sight and see the divine figure standing with an outstretched sword. We do not. We flip the paper and strike at the donkeys who struck out.
We ought to cry at the tragedies of life, and if we do not realize that they are there, we ought to cry about that. Then one day we will all smile. Forever.




Letter to the Editor: "that Talmudic/mystical waffle is rubbish"

Apparently, our choice of Torah Portion last Shabbat was… you decide:

Excerpt: When a person passes away the agents of Tuma or black colored negative spiritual angels and Shaddim come to snatch the body and claim it. At that same time positive angels built by Mitzvos come to guard the body… (full story)


Quite frankly, in my humble opinion that Talmudic/mystical waffle is rubbish. We know nothing about what awaits us after death. Certainly as Conservative Jews we do not subscribe to such an interpretation.
Our former Rabbi, a man of great Talmudic scholarship, reiterated that when we die, we die. Our place in the world to come, our immortality so to speak, is predicated on the way in which we live our lives here and now.
The rituals of Shiva and those concerning the various stages that mark the passing of our souls are part of the dignity with which we as Jews live our lives, nothing more.


The purpose of the commentary on the parsha was to post one view of the afterlife, and discuss the alternatives - from the parsha’s view of details of the afterlife, to my view of an afterlife of some sort, to your view of no afterlife. It also was intended to re-inforce our view that we are Conservative Jews, not Jews who believe in specifics of the afterlife and the specific actions that are required to obtain a good afterlife. Knowing the distinctions is also important when considering all Jews as a unity. I agree with you that the Parsha is nonsense, but then again I have no way of disproving it. It raises interesting questions for discussion and your letter has helped in that regard.


Personally, I couldn't read past the first two sentences. I have a low tolerance for stupidity...
Wow, I just read the piece. It's carefully crafted for the gullible, or dare I say religious. A true test of faith. Luckily, one that I failed miserably.
Faith sets the bar very low. The interpretation is fantastical. It has to be. The majority of the population truly wants to believe that there is some kind of afterlife.
Our beloved Orthodox will find enough truth in the references, to support their values which guide their lives. The fictional component only serves as the glue to hold the story together. The story is irrelevant. Like the torah, it all comes down to interpretation.
Believe this dvar torah or not.  Either way this article serves to strengthen your resolve/conviction.
(Thanks for your comment. It's bang on. How close this d'var torah comes to the actual torah portion, I can't speak to.)


The Last Word (One can only hope)

Read the full “Torah Reading for Chukat”  (you may find it more interesting/acceptable)


Rabbi Pauli goes into his commentary after citing Numbers, Chapter 19:14

“This is the law: if a man dies in a tent, anyone entering the tent and anything in the tent shall be unclean for seven days.”


Rabbi Pauli: “Perhaps it is time after many years of posting my Dvar Torah to speak not about the dynamics of the Parah Aduma (Red Heifer) but of the process of the ascending of the Neshama. This is based on Talmud Bavli Moed Katan and dozens of dozens of stories of near death experiences and dreams from people in the next world transmitted to a friend, partner or loved one.”  (In other words, Poppycock.)


Rabbi Pauli concludes: “Many instances of souls knowing 40 days before they are to depart this world to prepare themselves or they have a dream with a parent saying that soon they will meet in the next world. This is a warning for Repentance, Prayer and Charity and one must not lose the last opportunity for a Tikun in this world if they are lucky and worthy enough to have been warned from the next world.”  (One last attempt to control your flock.)


Rabbi Pauli obviously has “Licence to Thrill” in his Blog. However, it’s a far stretch to go from Chukat to ascension. The interpretation of Chukat to: today… I’m sure Rabbi Pauli has done that… more than a few times.  (I feel your pain.)


Kudos to our Bulletin Editor who sifted through Rabbi Pauli’s rather lengthy blog to find this Nugget.  (Reread Rabbi Pauli’s Blog portion and then let’s call it a wrap!)




Spotlight on “Sundays at 7 PM” - A Series on Jewish Music

The first presentation will be the History of Klezmer music. Very briefly, Klezmer (Yiddish: כליזמר or קלעזמער (klezmer), pl.: כליזמרים (klezmorim), כליזמר from Hebrew: כלי זמר — instruments of music) is a musical tradition of the Ashkenazi Jews of Eastern Europe. Played by professional musicians called klezmorim, the genre originally consisted largely of dance tunes and instrumental display pieces for weddings and other celebrations. In the United States the genre evolved considerably as Yiddish-speaking Jewish immigrants from Eastern Europe, who arrived between 1880 and 1924, met and assimilated American jazz. During the initial years after the klezmer revival of the 1970s, this was what most people knew as klezmer, although in the current century musicians have begun paying more attention to the "original" pre-jazz traditions …. Compared with most other European folk music styles, little is known about the history of klezmer music, and much of what is said about it must be seen as conjecture. (Wikipaedia)


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Opinions Wanted

1. We are currently looking at a statement as to who we are and our values.


Our current statement is the following;

The Lodzer Congregation is a Conservative Egalitarian Synagogue. Our goal is to: remember our past, live the present, and look to our future through prayer, learning and growing. We nurture our community with spiritual, educational, and social programs. We believe Jewish life in the synagogue enhances Jewish life in the home when we work together to bring Jewish education to all ages of our community.


The proposed statement is the following:

The Lodzer Congregation is a Conservative synagogue founded by Holocaust survivors from the city of Lodz, Poland. Building on our past, we are an active, vibrant shul, conscious of our religious history and traditions, but at the same time developing new forms of presentation  to appeal to the modern Canadian generation of Conservative Jews. We emphasize  Torah study and understanding based on Conservative ritual and traditions. We support Israel as a Jewish state and oppose anti-Semitism in all its forms. We are a friendly community who integrate the best moral and spiritual practices and ideas of Judaism with the best of Canadian culture and society.


We want your opinions and suggestions on whether you prefer the proposed new or old statements and your ideas of what, if anything, would be an improvement.


The contrary child suggests:

The Lodzer serves Conservative Egalitarian Judaism,

that begins and ends in the sanctuary.


Warning: You’ll only get out of Judaism, what you put into it.


Please let us know your opinions by e-mailing or telephoning the shul office or Charles or Jonathan.

2. In the last year we have changed the bulletin (both the e-mail version and the printed version) enormously. Mostly we want to make the bulletin a source of shul information, Jewish thought, and other matters of fact relating to our Jewish world, and events in Israel.

The Bulletin provides you with information that you want to read, or which we believe you need to know, as an informed Jew. Please participate with us with your constructive comments or submissions.  This week we are omitting the usual Pirke Avoth piece. If you want it, please let us know.  Send feedback to:  lodzercongregation@gmail.com




This picture does not follow Facebook’s community standards

Excerpt (from FB’s Community Standards): People can use Facebook to challenge ideas, institutions, and practices. Such discussion can promote debate and greater understanding. Sometimes people share content containing someone else's hate speech for the purpose of raising awareness or educating others about that hate speech. When this is the case, we expect people to clearly indicate their purpose, which helps us better understand why they shared that content.


Kudos Facebook! Let me explain:


Jews, go to Palestine! -- That was “Jew Hatred”


Jews, get out of Palestine! -- That is “Jew Hatred”


Please note that when the word “Jews” is substituted with the word “Israel”

That’s still “Jew Hatred”


Your assistance in not supporting "Jew Hatred" on Facebook

is much appreciated.


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Facebook doesn’t follow my standards of fairness. (Prove me wrong!)


Support: www.facebook.com/shofarproject  -- promoting greater community understanding.



G-d’s Messenger

The Jews are the Chosen People in order to be G-d’s messenger. But the Jews are a messenger who forgot his message… To spread ethical monotheism. (That is the theological term for G-d-based ethics.)

The tragic irony is that Orthodox Jews have forgotten that we have a message for the world.

Almost no one is bringing the authentic Jewish message to the world — that there is one G-d of all people and that this G-d’s primary demand is that human beings treat each other decently. You don’t need to be Jewish to go to heaven, you just have to live by basic moral laws and recognize that G-d is behind these moral laws.

Non-Orthodox Jews are quite busy bringing a (different) message to mankind — not on behalf of Judaism or ethical monotheism, but on behalf of the most dynamic religion in the world for the last hundred years: leftism. These Jews are preoccupied with telling the world that G-d is not necessary for morality; that Western society should be secular; that carbon emissions will destroy the world; that male and female no longer matter; that the married-father-and-mother family is no longer an ideal; that Israel is morally wrong; that “war is not the answer”; that material inequality is the greatest evil (closely followed by climate change); that no society or culture is better than any other; that fundamentalist Christians and Jews are the moral equivalent of fundamentalist Muslims,  among other left-wing doctrines.


“We are messengers; let us not forget our message.”  (Heschel)

The Netziv explains that paradoxically, anti-Semitism often flourishes precisely when the Jews are forgetting their message.

Therefore our obligation is not to improve ourselves in the eyes of our enemies, but to improve ourselves in the eyes of God.

With thanks to Rabbi Menken, The Shofar Project





Daily Minyan

Sunday – Friday: 9:00 am

We alternate with Beth Radom

on Sunday - check the schedule

posted on the side door.

Run by Arthur Zins

includes Breakfast following.


Come Daven, Fress & Schmooze,

then join in on a walk.


Saturdays: Shabbat Service

Birkot ha-Shachar 9:12 AM

 - (Led by Frank Steiman)
Yishtabach 9:30 AM

includes Kiddush Luncheon


Cemetery plots for sale to members in good standing (three years minimum).

If you are a member (3 years or more) and want to buy a plot, the cost per plot is $2500.

If you know anyone wanting a plot - the person can pay three years' membership dues and then be entitled to buy a plot.

This is an opportunity to purchase before prices increase.

Please call Sarah Senior, Lodzer Office Administrator,

for more information and to order:  416-636-6665


Contributions

Please consider sponsoring a kiddush, or contributing to the building, programming, or any specific interest fund, by phoning the shul office at

416-636-6665


Lodzer committee

members needed!

Help is always needed at the shul. Volunteer for a committee – you’ll be appreciated! Just call the office – 416-636-6665 and put your name in. The committee Chairperson will contact you.

Help us get the word out

Share the bulletin!

Lodzer Sisterhood Cookbooks

Great Gifts – just $20 each

Contact the Office at

416-636-6665

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Tree of Life or Seat Plaques

Remember family and friends by purchasing a leaf on our tree of life or a sanctuary seat plaque. Call the office at

416-636-6665.


Chesed Committee

Please call the shul office if you need support or if you know of one of our members who may need support. It remains confidential.

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Office Hours

Monday through Thursday

9 am - 1 pm and 2 pm - 4 pm

Friday

9 am to 1 pm

Executive

Jeff Shabes, President

Harvey Storm

Jonathan Usher

Morry Nosak

Marilyn Richmond                                

Board Members

Joe Ber

Henry Epstein

Roz Greene

Judy Hazen

Rafi Remez

Frank Steiman

Arnie Yudell


Honourary Member

Leon Pasternak


Rabbi Eli Courante

Cantor Marcel Cohen

B’aal Koreh:

Harvey Bitterman

Gabbai: Arnie Yudell

Bulletin Editor:

Jonathan Usher

e-Bulletin:

Charles Greene

Office Manager:

Sarah Senior


Website:

Who we are - Contact Info

Memberships

Bar and Bat Mitzvahs

High Holy Days 2016

Rabbi’s Corner


Shabbat Bulletin

For submissions/feedback:

lodzercongregation@gmail.com


Lodzer Office

For all business related e-mail:

lodzercentre@rogers.com



Does it ever stop?  Can we change the world?

Many Jews in Europe mistakenly thought that the restoration of our homeland (or at least part of it) in the land of Israel  and our national independence would bring an end to or diminution in anti-Semitism, but the contrary is the case.  The Europeans do not want us in Europe or in the Middle East.  As Israeli author Amos Oz has commented, in the 1930s the graffiti on European walls read: "Jews to Palestine!", but after 1948 they were changed to: "Jews out of Palestine!" i.e. don't be here and don't be there, or simply, what they really want, DON'T BE!
                       HUNGARIAN POSTER - HARD TO BELIEVE, BUT IT'S FOR REAL

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This poster describes a local "hunk" in uniform, fairly similar to the SS, holding a "small" Jew by his hair. The little Jew is ugly, his face distorted, hooked nose and trembling with fear. The pockets are designed to express that Jews have "pockets full  of money".
In case you are wondering, the poster is not from Germany, in the years of 1932 to 1945, but it is printed now, tens of thousands of copies all over Hungary (Date Picture - March 2014). Yes, anti-Semitism and hatred of Jews is rearing its head, and so began the roots that led to the Holocaust of the Jewish people.

(Unedited... Currently making the e-mail rounds. -- Well, I’ll have to admit, I did modify the poster somewhat. Spread the love!  

Aside: It was “pretty up the poster” or “remove it all together”. The message won, over our politics.)


“Be A Voice Not an ((--echo--))

Kind of explains why good people fall so easily into these groups.



Reader’s Comment   (name withheld - thanks)

The Hungarian White Cross were as brutal and anti-Semitic as the Nazis. Without their friendly co-operation and assistance, it is possible that the worst of the Hungarian Holocaust may have been avoided (as it was in Bulgaria (I think it was Bulgaria).

The thing I like about the article from Hungary is that people are visiting Eastern Europe (including our Rabbi) as if the Holocaust didn’t happen and as if there was no longer anti-Semitism there. Hungarians who’ve visited Hungary a few years ago said that anti-Semitism was rampant. Why do we Jews visit anti-Semitic places like Hungary or even France? etc. etc. Jeff is also on holidays in Europe. Why not Israel, India, etc etc? - or Costa Rica where I believe (it is one of the Islands) they accepted and saved Jews during the war. There are no more Jews there but if the synagogue does a tour that would be a good place to go.


(Any talk/reminders of antisemitism could be hurtful/painful to some of our members who endured the worst of what antisemitism has/had to offer. It has no place in our bulletin.  Antisemitism is basically free speech… a passing fad.)

Not On My Watch!




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And you shall call out and say before the Lord, your G-d,

"An Aramean [sought to] destroy my forefather, and he went down to Egypt and sojourned there with a small number of people, and there, he became a great, mighty, and numerous nation.”


(Deuteronomy - Ki Tavo 26:5)



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(You have no idea why you kill Jews.)



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