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20160716


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^^^ click on the graphic to read the flyer ^^^


THE LODZER SYNAGOGUE

Shabbat Bulletin - July 16, 2016




Make shul and Judaism an important part of your lifestyle

Sheldon Richmond waxes poetic, reporting from Poland:


“We heard the ominous night rumblings of the passing trains.
I davened Shachrit looking over the morning quiet of the tracks innocently doing their job regardless of the cargo carried in the trains.
Who is to blame?”

Signing off:  Sleepless in Warsaw.

I hope to see all of my good friends at the Lodzer this coming Shabbat!  Sheldon.


Read Sheldon’s update from Poland in the Members area.

Content may be disturbing!




Shalom from the black mountains of Montenegro.

Rabbi Eli

“Where in the world is Rabbi Eli?”




This Shabbat:

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I love hats! To me hats and long gloves are so classy.



Judy fell at her cottage and needed hospitalization.

She is back home and in (not into) good spirits.

Our sincere condolences to Yona Nadler and her family

on the loss of Yona’s mother,  Dvora Geskin.


We had a special D’var Torah this week on Isi’s experience with learning his father’s history, especially his experience as a Holocaust survivor, and the importance of documenting and preserving that history for future generations.

As well, Barbara Lazar spoke about the work of the Azareli foundation in documenting the stories of Holocaust survivors, and urged our members to help bring all those that have not yet told their stories to the foundation. Not only is it important work, but it gives to those who participate a release from the suffering of their memories and it gives them back their smiles.


Under the direction of Marcel Cohen, the Lodzer is bringing us a series of ten presentations on Jewish music. Each presentation will consist of an explanation and examples of Jewish music of a particular era. The series begins on Sunday August 21st and ends December 18th.  The times are Sundays at 7:00 p.m. There is no charge, but donations are welcome. Refreshments will be served. Pick up a flyer from the hall desk for details and dates.

To read the press release and view the flyer,

click on the “Sundays at 7 PM” banner at the top of this e-bulletin.


Memories of the Second Generation - Part 2 - Phil Herman

As told to Susan Yellin

Read it here, NOW!



Memories of the Second Generation - Part 2 - Phil Herman - As told to Susan Yellin

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Memories of the Second Generation Part 2   Phil Herman

Phil Herman was just four years old in 1951 when his parents Max and Rose brought the family to Canada from Sweden.

While both Phil’s parents had deep connections to Lodz (his father was born there and his mother raised there), they were separated during the Second World War and sent to different labour camps. After the fighting ended, Max Herman sought out his wife and found her in Stockholm where she had been sent by the Red Cross.  It was there that Phil was born.

One of Phil’s first memories in Toronto was the Lodzer Centre Mutual Benefit Society and the warm, inviting feeling his family received when they attended parties at the Society on Spadina and other gatherings at Jacksons Point, a small summer resort harbour on Lake Simcoe.

The Hermans came to the Society via Phil’s uncle who had arrived earlier in Canada and had met a number of landsmen who had either been born in Lodz or were together in the Lodz ghetto.


“All of us were like extended family,” says Phil. “One of the couples [the Ciechanowskis] was like a second family to me. They lived on Spadina across the street and I used to play in their house all the time while my parents were working. Their daughter was like the sister I never had.”

Max Herman was one of the founding members of the Lodzer Centre Congregation, which opened in 1981. He went to shul religiously every Saturday and took his young family to the Lodzer on the High Holidays.

Phil sat as a Lodzer board member in the 1990s and counts his time there as both informative and challenging.

He has always been left with the heartfelt feeling that the Lodzer was a welcoming home for both those who survived the Holocaust and those who came after them.




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In honour of the birthdays of Nisa and Shirley, I will wear the hat shown on this Shabbat.


It belonged to Dora’s grandfather, who wore it in shul in South Africa in the early 1920’s.


It is the usual dress of a Gabbai (which he was) in 1920’s South Africa.


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Birthdays


July 15  Franya Goldberg
July 15  Ruth Goldstein
July 15  Rick Grunberg

July 17  Anna Holtzman
July 19  Shirley Smoskowitz
July 19  Jeff Shabes
July 20  Zenia Rybowski
July 20  Nisa Shedletzky
July 21  Alicia Harris


Anniversaries

July 15  Judy & Charly Hazan

July 17  Cantor Morris & Sonia Goldlust
July 21  Eytan Broder & Penny Hung

Yahrzeits


July 12  Esther Malet, mother of Dennis
July 12  Rose Stolberg, mother of Esther Steiman
July 14  Max Anidjar, brother of Morris
July 14  Henry Berger, father of Robert
July 14  Nayim Dagan, father of Isaak

July 16  Morris Bitterman, father of Harvey
July 16  Irving Gula, brother of Esther Steiman
July 16  Max Lichter, father of Myrna
July 18  Milly Abrahams, mother of Jack
July 19  Barry Gold, husband of Lisa
July 22  Goldie Landis, mother of Lorraine



The July 6th meeting with Rabbi Menken.

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Rabbi Menken was brilliant, enjoyable and enlightening with a new idea. He is not Jabotinsky, warning us of the approaching dangers, but provided a new idea on the source of anti-Semitism and a method of fighting anti-Semitism. His idea is that the purpose of Judaism is to bring light unto the world, that is to bring morality to the world, as we have done with bringing the idea of one God, and the ten commandments, respect for all human life, and other ideas of morality. Anti-Semitism, which should be called Jew-hatred, takes many forms but essentially stems from evil people who object to our ideas of morality and our propagation of it. The way to fight anti-Semitism therefore is to be confident of the mission of Judaism, understand Judaism, and counter the lies with factual truths.

http://Torah.org   http://shofarproject.org/   onFacebook



Quotes of the Day

Waste no more time arguing about what a good man should be. Be one.

Marcus Aurelius (121 - 180 C.E.)



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Wednesdays

7:30-8:30 pm

Parsha of The Week

(POW)

with Judy Hazan



POW returns Sept. 7

Enjoy the Summer!


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Join this lively group every Wednesday night at 7:30 PM at The Lodzer where we study the week’s sedra together. Classes are informal and no prior knowledge or preparation is required. The purpose of the class is to learn the story of the parsha, determine its most important elements and tie its morals and lessons into our daily lives. This is open to the public and there is no cost.

For more information contact:

Judy Hazan 416-704-1693


Shabbat

after the kiddush

Pirke Avoth

Discussion Group

with Jonathan Usher


Every shabbat, after the kiddush there is a vibrant discussion of one Mishnah of Pirke Avoth.


Read Jonathan’s Pirke Avoth Discussion Points for the week at the end of this

Shabbat Bulletin.


Monday,

TBA

7:30 pm

Shul

Book Chat

with Cathy Zeldin

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(Suggest possible books to read and we’ll profile them in the ebulletin)

Book Chat will take a break for the summer and return in the fall.  At our first meeting we will discuss "The Immigrant" by Lawrence Hill.  Date TBA.

Wishing you all a great summer!
Cathy


Thanks to everyone who supports our Book Chat group.  It's lots of fun.


For more information or to suggest books to read, please contact cathyrzeldin@gmail.com


Saturday,

July 16

10 Tamuz


Birkot

ha-Shachar

9:12 AM

Led by

Frank Steiman


Yishtabach

9:30 AM

Kiddush Lunch


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This week’s Kiddush is co-sponsored by:


Shirley Smoskowitz

And

Nisa Shedletzky

honouring their birthdays.


The sponsors of the kiddush have asked that women congregants wear hats on this special Shabbat.

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Torah Times

Torah Reading: Triennial Year 3

Parashat Chukkas

Numbers:
1: 21:11-13 (pg. 660)
2: 21:14-16
3: 21:17-20
4: 21:21-25
5: 21:26-28
6: 21:29-33
7: 21:34-22:1
maftir: 21:34-22:1 (pg. 663)


Haftarah:

Judges 11:1-33 (pg. 664)



Candle Lighting: 8:38 p.m. – Friday

Havdalah: 9:45 p.m. – Saturday



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Saturday,

July 23

17 Tamuz


Birkot

ha-Shachar

9:12 AM

Led by

Frank Steiman


Yishtabach

9:30 AM

Kiddush Lunch



To sponsor a Kiddush

please call the office

416-636-6665



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Sunday,

August 14


10 Av

Tisha B’Av



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Sunday,

August 21

7 PM

Lodzer

Centre

Congregation


12 Heaton St.

416-636-6665

All classes are on Sunday at 7 pm:

Free of charge.

Donations are welcome.

Refreshments will be served following

each presentation.


This project is funded

In part by the

Government of Canada

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The History of Klezmer Music.


Presentation by:

Raisa and Viktor Orshansky

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Sunday,

August 28

7 PM

Lodzer

Centre

Congregation


12 Heaton St.

416-636-6665

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"Where Does that Tune

Come From?"


The Musical Origin of Popular Jewish Melodies.


Presentation by:

Charles Heller

Sunday,

September 11

7 PM

Lodzer

Centre

Congregation


12 Heaton St.

416-636-6665

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The Yiddish Theatre.


Presentation by:

Faye Kellerstein



Sunday,

September 18

7 PM

Lodzer

Centre

Congregation


12 Heaton St.

416-636-6665

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Jewish Music of North Africa.


Presentation by:

Cantor Aaron Bensoussan




Rosh Hashanah


Sunday eve, Oct. 2 , 2016, and Monday and Tuesday all day Oct.3, 2016 and Oct. 4, 2016.

The Jewish New Year


Yom Kippur


Tuesday eve, Oct 11,
2016, and Wed., all day Oct. 12, 2016.

Kol Nidre and Day of Atonement

(fast and break the fast)


Sukkot


Sunday eve, Oct 16, 2016, and Monday and Tuesday all day, Oct. 17,  and Oct. 18, 2016

Feast of Tabernacles


Hoshanah Rabah and
Shmini Atzeret


Sunday, Oct 23, 2016
Monday, Oct.24, 2016 and Yizkor

Eighth Day of Assembly


Simchat Torah


Monday eve, Oct. 24 and all day Tuesday, Oct 25, 2016

Day of Celebrating the Torah

Sunday,

October 30

7 PM

Lodzer

Centre

Congregation


12 Heaton St.

416-636-6665

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The Jewish Role in Jazz

and the

Israeli Jazz Scene.


Presentation by:

Reuven Grajner


Sunday,

November 6

7 PM

Lodzer

Centre

Congregation


12 Heaton St.

416-636-6665

All classes are on Sunday at 7 pm:

Free of charge.

Donations are welcome.

Refreshments will be served following

each presentation.


This project is funded

In part by the

Government of Canada

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The Golden Age of Cantorial Music.


Presentation by:

Cantor David Nemtzov



Sunday,

November 20

7 PM

Lodzer

Centre

Congregation


12 Heaton St.

416-636-6665

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Jewish Music of The Middle East:

Part One.


Presentation by:

Cantor Aaron Bensoussan



Sunday,

November 27

7 PM

Lodzer

Centre

Congregation


12 Heaton St.

416-636-6665

All classes are on Sunday at 7 pm:

Free of charge.

Donations are welcome.

Refreshments will be served following

each presentation.


This project is funded

In part by the

Government of Canada

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Jewish Music of Eastern Europe.


Presentation by:

Raisa and Viktor Orshansky

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Sunday,

December 4

7 PM

Lodzer

Centre

Congregation


12 Heaton St.

416-636-6665

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Jewish Music of The Middle East:

Part Two.


Presentation by:

Cantor Aaron Bensoussan

Sunday,

December 18

7 PM

Lodzer

Centre

Congregation


12 Heaton St.

416-636-6665

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Israeli Music.


Presentation by:

Cantor David Edwards





Biography - Jews who changed how we look at everything

Richard Feynman (1918 - 1988)  Nobel Laureate Physics

- known for inventing Feynman diagram to explain electrodynamics. Worked on inventing the Atomic Bomb & determine the cause of the Challenger space shuttle disaster. Both he and Einstein and Jonathan did not talk until they were almost four.

Arno Penzias (1933 - ) & Robert Wilson co-discovered evidence of the Big Bang

- both received the Nobel Prize in physics. At age six, Penzias was among the Jewish children evacuated to Britain from Germany as part of the Kindertransport rescue operation. He was later re-united with his parents in the U.S.



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אויף דריי זאכן שטייט די ועלט: אויף געלט,יוף געלט און אויף געלט.


Oyf drei zachen shteit di velt: oif gelt,oif gelt ,un oif gelt.


The world stands on three things: on money, on money and on money.


The saying is a parody of the Mishnah;
The World Stands On Three things:

On Torah,On Service, And On Deeds Of Loving Kindness.

...............


מיט געלט פארשטאפט מען דער וועלט דאס מויל.


Mit gelt farshtopt men der velt dos moil.


Money makes the world shut it's mouth.


Words Our Sages:
"A man's wealth hides his blemishes, and straightens his crookedness".
( R' Shlomo ben Gevirol ).




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Editor’s Note: I have taken this excerpt from Rabbi Pauli’s parsha on Chukkas. It was so different, precise, and interesting that I am including it here for your consideration.

Rabbi Rachamim Pauli
Thursday, June 28th 2012

Parsha Chukkas

Perhaps it is time after I many years of posting my Dvar Torah to speak … about the process of the ascending of the Neshama. This is based on Talmud Bavli Moed Katan and dozens of dozens of stories of near death experiences and dreams from people in the next world transmitted to a friend, partner or loved one.

When a person passes away the agents of Tuma or black colored negative spiritual angels and Shaddim come to snatch the body and claim it at that time positive angels built by Mitzvos come to guard the body. The body and soul are semi-joined between the time of death and the last person to leave after the burial. The soul can take a number of routes towards the seat of Judgement. The soul can pass through a terrible darkness on its journey or darkness with a tunnel of light or light and drawn like a magnet to the well of souls in the Machpelah Cave and then up to Judgement. There is in that realm a crystal and wonderful palace where the soul waits for Judgement shuttering in fear. One sees on the way dead ancestors some of whom are known and some one knows telepathically. If they are smiling the soul is in good shape but if the opposite that is not a good sign. Once in a while one can hear the words make way for the Tzaddik so and so. The soul is so confused that it may forget its own name when going before the Beis Din.

In the Beis Din sit famous Rabbis of past eras. I know that Rabbis so and so in the future will not Judge me for I am a family member. In fact if I have embarrassed them, they may want a negative ruling against me. Neutral Judges are chosen. The Neshama is called before Beis Din and instantaneously the whole life of so and so many years flashes before the person. The person may have forgotten this sin or promise but HASHEM did not and the Judgement can be harsh. Prosecuting Angels testify against the soul and the scales begin to sink in their direct. Then come the defending Angels trying to tip the scales of Justice in their direction. One outstanding Mitzva or heaven forbid an Avaira can tip the scales to this way or that.

The Beis Din then takes everything into account and the ruling goes forth either in rare cases Gan Eden or in most cases up to 11 months of purification in Gehennom. Very few are wicked enough to get Kaf Keller which can be years of Tikun prior to Gehennom and others in a limbo without Judgement. (The last category is like Pharaoh, Saddam Hussein, Hitler, Stalin, etc.) It is rare that a person has done so much Teshuva or Mitzvos that he goes straight to Gan Eden.

During the first 7 days, the soul still has affection for the body and this world and a spark hovers between the grave and the house of Shiva or the home of the deceased. The next period of days for ascension to a higher level is after 30 days and it is on this day or later that the spirit can come and communicate with the living via a dream or vision. For the next period of the remaining 10 to 11 months, the soul is less and less in this world and more and more in the next as the body begins to decompose. A worm in the flesh of a dead person feels to the soul like a needle in a live person. After a year on each Yahrzeit depending on the behavior of the next generations, the soul can ascend to higher heights or remain at the same level. If one was a big Tzaddik but did not transmit the religion properly to the next generation that they violated the Shabbos or Mitzvos, a black tar like spiritual substance can be smeared on the face of the soul in the next world as a punishment.

Many instances of souls knowing 40 days before they are to depart this world to prepare themselves or they have a dream with a parent saying that soon they will meet in the next world. This is a warning for Repentance, Prayer and Charity and one must not lose the last opportunity for a Tikun in this world if they are lucky and worthy enough to have been warned from the next world.




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Pirke Avoth Perek 2 Mishnah 13-14

Note: This commentary is taken from Ethics from Sinai by Irving M. Bunim. Some sentences of  have been taken verbatim (in quotes) and others have been summarized. All relate to Mishnot 13 and 14. The Questions are my own.

13] Said he {Rabban Yohanan ben Zakkai} to them: Go out and see which is the good way to which a man should cling. Rabbi Eliezer said, A good, kindly eye; Rabbi Joshua said, A good friend; Rabbi Yose said, A good neighbour; Rabbi Simeon said, One who foresees, reckons the outcome of things; Rabbi Elazar said, A good heart. Said he to them: I appreciate the worlds of Elazar ben Arach above all your statements, for in his words yours are included.

14] Said he to them: Go out and see which is the evil way that a man should shun. Rabbi Eliezer said, An evil eye; Rabbi Joshua said, A bad friend; Rabbi Yose said, A bad neighbour, Rabbi Simeon said, One who borrows and does not repay. When someone borrows from a man, it is one and the same as borrowing from the Omnipresent God – as it is said, “The wicked borrows and does not repay, but the righteous one deals graciously and gives”; Rabbi Elazar said, An evil heart. Said he [Rabban Yohanan] to them: I appreciate the words of Elazar ben Arach above all your statements, for in his words yours are included.

“Rabban Yohanan implied to his disciples, ‘Now that you have absorbed so much book learning, now that you are men of knowledge and understanding – go out and see.’… So long as you are children at home, in a sheltered environment, so long as you are at your father’s table surrounded by like-minded family and friends, I have no way of knowing whether my teaching and my upbringing have taken root. Well then, ‘go, children’ – go our into the unfriendly world , encounter strange people and differing doctrines, and if after that experience, after you are on your own, you still ‘ listen to me,’ then I know that I have ‘ taught you the fear of the Lord.’ ‘So, too, says Rabban Yohanan ben Zakkai: go out and determine your values in the fires of experience.”’

Question: When our children leave for university should we tell them that testing their values is one of the objectives?

Rabbi Eliezer said, A good eye.

“’A good eye’ denotes a generous, unselfish spirit; an open-hearted receptivity to people, things and ideas; a wholesome acceptance of yourself and your lot in life. Rabbi Eliezer was the ‘cemented cistern’ whose perfect memory lost not a drop of knowledge. To develop this way, he had to be receptive, willing to receive and retain the spiritual heritage of Torah, without the resistance of ill will, protest or rancor. It also requires a generous, kindly spirit to give the knowledge freely to others, and not withhold it for the sake of ulterior, selfish rewards.”

‘The person with a ‘good eye’ finds deep gratification in teaching and in helping others.’’

“An evil eye … implies envy, jealousy, constant discontent, and a … spirit which abhors sharing with others or serving others.”

Rabbi Joshua said, A good friend.

“Not only should you be a good friend, but you should also choose for yourself a good friend.”

Question: Are there objectives in choosing a friend?

Rabbi Yose said, A good neighbour.

Rabbi Yahanan had described him as a hasid, a man of piety. The hasid always goes beyond the letter of the law, oft forfeiting his own rights, to live by the rule, ‘What is yours is yours, and what is mine is yours. ‘. This is indeed the ‘good neighbour’.”

“If you wish to remain a hasid and live with loving-kindness and piety, you must stay far away from a ‘bad neighbour’. For he will ridicule your observances and laugh at your religious way of life. Unable to understand your pious ways, he will scoff and make things unpleasant for you, your wife and your children. Furthermore, if you are a hasid and your neighbour is unscrupulous, he will cynically take advantage of you, exploit your good nature, and may even succeed in taking away your property. For as the Hafetz Hayyim once observed, ‘ If you have the scruples and the other person has the power, you will probably lose your dispute’… No person will forever remain a victim surrounded by bad neighbours; if he stays with them, even the hasid will soon adopt their methods, if only in self-defence.” “Ultimately , the best neighbour is a good neighbourhood. A Jew should always strive to live in a locality that has a Jewish character, where people stream to the synagogue on Sabbath morning, where he can find a Yeshivah, .… In the beneficial environment of the Jewish religious neighbourhood, you and your family can find roots for a thriving life of Torah.”

Question: Is this true?

Rabbi Simeon ben Nethanel said, One who foresees the outcome.

“In the description of Rabban Yohanan ben Zakkai, Rabbi Simeon was a man who feared sin. It is not surprising then, in his answer to the question, ‘which is the good way to which a man should cling’ that his ‘good way’ is one that can greatly help to prevent immoral action. For the sin often looks tempting and inviting when it is first considered. The ugly consequences, the black remorse, the agonizing guilt may not be perceived until long after the sin is done.”

Question: Is not avoiding evil the mark of a gullible person – i.e. a person without the ability to foresee consequences.

When one borrows from a man, it is one and the same as borrowing from the Omnipresent God.

This is because God “commands us to extend a helping hand to our brother in need.” God will therefore have to reimburse the creditor.

Rabbi Elazar said, A good heart.

“This seems to denote a spontaneous, open love for the good everywhere, an intuitive grasp of what is good in every situation, and a desire for it. This would appear to have little to do with reason or intelligence. As people say, ‘ The heart has its reasons that reason does not know.’” “For Judaism the heart symbolizes the seat of freedom, the decision-making element in man. He who has a ‘good heart’ has won all. He who has an ‘evil heart’ has lost the innermost citadel.”

“The heart can be trained and educated through the mitzvoth to the point where it chooses good.”“’Then will you understand the reverence of the Lord, and find the knowledge of God…’ says the wise Solomon, ‘when wisdom will enter your heart and knowledge will be pleasant to your spirit’.”

Question:  Is having a good heart nature or nurture?

Editors Note: I am including an article on the importance of the late Elie Wiesel. (Thanks Jonathan - read it below)




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Who will be our moral compass now?

By AVI BENLOLO
Fri., July 8, 2016

Elie Wiesel was the last one. Not the last Holocaust survivor. Not the last author or philosopher, but the last of the last from a generation of wise people who served as humanity’s conscience. We still needed his wisdom to help us navigate these tumultuous times. Britain’s renowned Rabbi Lord Jonathan Sacks defined this sentiment just a few days ago when he wrote, “there is a widespread feeling that the world in the 21st century is running out of control… these are dangerous forces, the far right seeking a return to a golden age that never was, the far left in pursuit of a utopia that will never be. They are both enemies of freedom.”
Elie Wiesel’s life was buffeted by such extreme ideologies, and his caution remains significant. In today’s world, where life often seems to have little value, where faceless innocents are slaughtered by the dozens in terror attacks and quickly forgotten, Elie Wiesel reminded the world of life’s incredible value. He remained forever astonished “that I survived the Holocaust and went on to love beautiful girls, to talk, to write, to have toast and tea and live my life.”
His generation was the generation of the 20th century that struggled to put a broken world back together. His generation was the generation of Martin Luther King Jr. A generation that fought for social justice and humanity. It was a generation that spoke about not being silent. In King’s words, “our lives begin to end the day we become silent about things that matter.” Similarly, Wiesel would argue “we must take sides. Neutrality helps the oppressor, never the victim. Silence encourages the tormentor, never the tormented.”
With Elie Wiesel’s passing, the great generation that empowered us and guided us to speak out against repression, violence and hatred - is gone. Gone are the icons who refused to shake hands with the devil, choosing instead to impart their righteousness through their actions and wisdom. Mahatma Gandhi, one of the first leaders widely revered for his non-violent methods, gave the world a new path toward freedom. He put the responsibility for social change on each and every one of us, instructing, “You must be the change you wish to see in the world.” And so, each of us becomes the centre – the bridge and the pinnacle – for expressing goodness.
A similar inner wisdom and peace is found in the profound writings of Helen Keller, who believed the moral imperative to improve the world starts from within. Deaf and blind from childhood, Keller understood better than most that “the best and most beautiful things in the world cannot be seen or even touched – they must be felt with the heart.”
The 20th century also gave us Mother Teresa as a guidepost for compassion. She dedicated her entire life to extensive humanitarian work in Calcutta, caring for refugees, the sick and the orphaned with love and affection. Mother Teresa showered the world with good will and believed that “kind words can be short and easy to speak, but their echoes are truly endless.”
And among the last of the greats was Nelson Mandela – the man who freed South Africa from the chains of the racist project known as apartheid. He understood that “to be free is not merely to cast off one’s chains, but to live in a way that respects and enhances the freedom of others.”
Freedom from our oppressors. Freedom of faith. Freedom from hunger and deprivation. Freedom from darkness. Freedom from hate and intolerance. This is the wisdom that our great prophets have imparted to us. But freedom, as Holocaust survivor Simon Wiesenthal warned, “is not a gift from heaven. You must fight for it each and every day of your life.”
For Elie Wiesel and all those of his generation who advocated for social justice, the commitment to fighting for freedom often led to criticism and ridicule. However, if there is one lesson these great men and women could teach us, it is to stand up for what we believe and know in our hearts to be right and true – even if we are standing alone.
This moral compass is the greatest gift left to us by Elie Wiesel. We are now all committed to serving as humanity’s conscience.

Avi Benlolo is president and CEO of the Canadian Friends of Simon Wiesenthal Center for Holocaust Studies.




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Reminder: Send content to  lodzercongregation@gmail.com




Daily Minyan

Sunday – Friday: 9:00 am

We alternate with Beth Radom

on Sunday - check the schedule

posted on the side door.

Run by Arthur Zins

includes Breakfast following.


Come Daven, Fress & Schmooze,

then join in on a walk.


Saturdays: Shabbat Service

Birkot ha-Shachar 9:12 AM

 - (Led by Frank Steiman)
Yishtabach 9:30 AM

includes Kiddush Luncheon


Cemetery plots for sale to members in good standing (three years minimum).

If you are a member (3 years or more) and want to buy a plot, the cost per plot is $2500.

If you know anyone wanting a plot - the person can pay three years' membership dues and then be entitled to buy a plot.

This is an opportunity to purchase before prices increase.

Please call Sarah Senior, Lodzer Office Administrator,

for more information and to order:  416-636-6665


Contributions

Please consider sponsoring a kiddush, or contributing to the building, programming, or any specific interest fund, by phoning the shul office at

416-636-6665


Lodzer committee

members needed!

Help is always needed at the shul. Volunteer for a committee – you’ll be appreciated! Just call the office – 416-636-6665 and put your name in. The committee Chairperson will contact you.

Help us get the word out

Share the bulletin!

Lodzer Sisterhood Cookbooks

Great Gifts – just $20 each

Contact the Office at

416-636-6665

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Tree of Life or Seat Plaques

Remember family and friends by purchasing a leaf on our tree of life or a sanctuary seat plaque. Call the office at

416-636-6665.


Chesed Committee

Please call the shul office if you need support or if you know of one of our members who may need support. It remains confidential.

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Office Hours

Monday through Thursday

9 am - 1 pm and 2 pm - 4 pm

Friday

9 am to 1 pm

Executive

Jeff Shabes, President

Harvey Storm

Jonathan Usher

Morry Nosak

Marilyn Richmond                                

Board Members

Joe Ber

Henry Epstein

Roz Greene

Judy Hazen

Rafi Remez

Frank Steiman

Arnie Yudell


Honourary Member

Leon Pasternak


Rabbi Eli Courante

Cantor Marcel Cohen

B’aal Koreh:

Harvey Bitterman

Gabbai: Arnie Yudell

Bulletin Editor:

Jonathan Usher

e-Bulletin:

Charles Greene

Office Manager:

Sarah Senior


Website:

Who we are - Contact Info

Memberships

Bar and Bat Mitzvahs

High Holy Days 2016

Rabbi’s Corner


Shabbat Bulletin

For submissions/feedback:

lodzercongregation@gmail.com


Lodzer Office

For all business related e-mail:

lodzercentre@rogers.com





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