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Gang Chain

10 feet long with 5 neck collars. Neck ring made in 2 halves. One was linked at both ends, the other hinged - with an elongated loop at free end through which a large pear-shaped free link would pass.

Of Belgic origin - dated from first half of the first century AD. The Belgae came to Britain from Northern France during Roman activity. They played a large part in the slave trade, selling British captives to the Romans.

10 feet long with 5 neck collars. Neck ring made in 2 halves. One was linked at both ends, the other hinged - with an elongated loop at free end through which a large pear-shaped free link would pass.

Of Belgic origin - dated from first half of the first century AD. The Belgae came to Britain from Northern France during Roman activity. They played a large part in the slave trade, selling British captives to the Romans. 

Examples to be seen on Roman/Celtic sculptures in Europe. The chain proves that there was a

strong contact between Anglesey and the South of England. The small scabbard mounts and the couldrons have the Romanaised patterns also.

The Romans used slave chain gangs on their large building projects - legionary fortresses.

Three lines referring to Britain in Claudius' mock funeral:

Et caeruleos scuta Brigantas
Dare romuleis colla catenis jussit

And he ordered the blue shielded Brigantes to give their
necks to the Roman chains.






















Photographs copyright by permission of the National Museum, Wales