Metaphor

Definition: "a figure of speech in which one thing is spoken of as though it were something else; the identification suggests a comparison between two thing that are identified, as in 'death is a long sleep (Wiggins R28)."


Textual Evidence #1
  •  "was admirably adapted to Pearl's beauty, and made her the very brightest little jet of flame that ever danced upon the earth."In this description, Pearl is likened to a bright jet of flame, without the use of 'like' or 'as,' which gives good and bad characteristics to the little girl (Hawthorne 90)."  - The Scarlet Letter

Textual Evidence #2
  • "We have as yet hardly spoken of the infant; that little creature, whose innocent life had sprung, by the inscrutable decree of Providence, a lovely and immortal flower, out of the rank luxuriance of a guilty passion (Hawthorne 81)." - The Scarlet Letter

Textual Evidence #3
  • "Tom's Wife was a tall termagant (Irving 230)." - The Devil and Tom Walker

Textual Evidence #4

  • "And each separate dying ember wrought its ghost upon the floor (Poe 313)." - The Raven

Media Evidence #1)

Katy Perry Firework

  • Cause, baby, you're a firework
    Come on, show 'em what you're worth
    Make 'em go, "Aah, aah, aah"                     
    As you shoot across the sky-y-y  (1:00)


Multimedia Evidence #2

Stepbrothers- Voice of an Angel

  • "Brennan, that is a voice of an angel" (2:14)

Multimedia Evidence #3) 

Stepbrothers- Taking a Bull by the Horns

"Taking the Bull by the Horns" (:38) 

Analysis:  A metaphor is "a figure of speech in which one thing is spoken of as though it were something else; the identification suggests a comparison between two thing that are identified (Wiggins R28)." A metaphor is described as a figure of speech that makes a comparison between two things that are basically dissimilar. In other words, it describes one thing in terms of another. It is comparative, and thus goes beyond a mere descriptive adjective. A metaphor describes one object as having the characteristics of a second object. Unlike a simile, a metaphor does not use connective words such as likeas, or resembles in making the comparison.  In "The Scarlet Letter" Hawthorne uses metaphors to describe characters, in this case Pearl, We have as yet hardly spoken of the infant; that little creature, whose innocent life had sprung, by the inscrutable decree of Providence, a lovely and immortal flower, out of the rank luxuriance of a guilty passion (Hawthorne 81)."  In this passage Pearl is compared to a "lovely and immortal flower."  Metaphors strengthens writers in that it writers are able to show what they truly want a character, setting, or concept to be.  Writers are able to compare their idea with anything they can think of, that will help the reader understand that idea.  In "The Devil and Tom Walker" Washington Irving uses a metaphor to describes Tom's wife, "Tom's Wife was a tall termagant (Irving 230)."  This helps the reader get a better idea of who Tom's wife is and what she is like very quickly using a metaphor.  Metaphors are used everywhere in pop culture.  They are a very common literary device.  Metaphors are used by artists in songs everywhere to describe ideas or objects very quickly and also stay in rhyme scheme.  In movies metaphors are also used, many times to convey a deeper meaning to simple sentences.
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