Module 1: Introduction to Computers

Introduction

Given how ubiquitous computers are in our personal and work lives, Introduction to Computers should be taught to any level of ESL or ABE student, using modifications when appropriate. This training should be completely hands-on. If you don’t have enough computers for your class, consider breaking up the class; don’t have someone “look on.”  Attempt to make everything you teach interactive; ask students what is of particular use or interest to them, and focus on those things. The documents attached below include lesson plans, printable guides for students, handouts, etc.
 

For computer instructors 

Introduction to Computers follows a logical progression, but it isn’t necessary to teach it all before incorporating other modules and skills into the course. Do not plan on printing any of the exercises or parts of the guide for your students unless they are particularly literate; rather, talk them through the exercises. Some of the exercises are more difficult than others, so choose exercises suitable for your students. Use the mousercise exercise on the first day after preliminaries so students will have the satisfaction of “working on the computer” immediately. After students run through it once or twice, emphasize the skills they will use particularly often including highlighting, copy and paste, and filling out on-line forms.

 

After teaching the first lesson, continue to teach the same skills throughout other units. Repetition and reintroduction in other forms of the same material are both important parts of computer education.  

 

For computer tutors

Computer education is particularly well suited to one-on-one lessons since lessons can be tailored to a student’s particular interest and skills. If your student did not complete the Computer Skills Assessment with his/her advisor, do this first.  Then work with your student on the Computer Skills Goal Setting form. These provide a starting point for your tutoring session.

Rather than using the PowerPoint presentation for the direct instruction pieces, use the Guide and go over the parts with your student. Do not plan on printing any of the exercises or parts of the guide for your students unless they are particularly literate; rather, talk them through the exercises.

 

At whatever point in the curriculum you start teaching, remember to reintroduce skills you’ve taught until your student can easily use them. Repetition is a very important part of computer education.

 

For ESL and ABE instructors incorporating into class work

Teach students how to turn on their computers and the parts of the computer. It is possible to make simple and fun games. (Examples: 1. Cut out the names of the different parts of the computer and have students tape them to their own computers. 2. Create a simple matching game.)   If your class will be saving anything in folders, teach them to create and rename folders. They will also need to learn to either highlight, copy, and paste, or highlight, drag and drop.

 

You might want to consider computer education a fluency exercise rather than an accuracy exercise; minimize requiring students to use “correct” English and focus on the computer skills. It is easy to make computer education fun and interactive.

 

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lindseyk@literacysource.org,
Nov 10, 2010, 3:52 PM
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lindseyk@literacysource.org,
Nov 10, 2010, 3:52 PM
ĉ
lindseyk@literacysource.org,
Nov 10, 2010, 3:52 PM
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Literacy Source,
Feb 2, 2015, 4:24 PM
ĉ
lindseyk@literacysource.org,
Nov 10, 2010, 3:52 PM
ĉ
lindseyk@literacysource.org,
Nov 10, 2010, 3:52 PM
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lindseyk@literacysource.org,
Nov 10, 2010, 3:52 PM
ĉ
lindseyk@literacysource.org,
Nov 10, 2010, 3:52 PM
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