Goal Setting

Literacy Source sees goal setting as an integral and crucial aspect of the learning process. To that end, all volunteers are encouraged to participate in the Goal Setting and Lesson Planning 3 part training, offered 3 times per year. Please see a staff member to learn more.

 

As part of the intake process at Literacy Source, advisors spend time with each student to help him or her identify goals related to their roles as learners, employees/workers, family members, and community members. These goals are assessed and adjusted appropriately on a quarterly basis.

 

Effective instruction is focused on meeting students’ goals, so goal-setting should also be incorporated into your classes or tutoring sessions. Here are some strategies:

 

Goal Setting Strategies for Tutors

Goal Setting Strategies for Class Instructors

 

In addition to the strategies above, here are some general tips for setting goals:

 
Revisit goal-setting on a regular basis, even with the lowest-level learners. Provide the students with examples of short-term and long-term goals that are SMART: specific, measurable, achievable, realistic, and timely. Make goal setting part of a classroom or tutoring activities.  You can do this in a variety of ways:
  • Become familiar with your students’ purposes for learning and connect these purposes to their specific and broad goals. Help students recognize how achieving their goals is a step toward succeeding at their broader purposes for participating at Literacy Source.
  • During the first few weeks of class or tutoring, establish ways for students to determine how they will know that they are successful and how they will document their progress.
  • Find ways to celebrate progress. Discuss this with your class coordinator or student’s advisor for suggestions.
  • Set reasonable goals. Sometimes the goal of getting a job or a better job, helping children in school, or learning how to survive in a new country is enough stimulus to motivate a student to do whatever needs to be done to achieve that goal. Setting small goals which the student can reach in a reasonable time is a good way to use his/her goal orientation to best advantage. Examples of short-term goals could be reading a book at his/her level, writing a letter to a friend, filling out a job application, or learning to take a telephone message.

For examples of goal setting activities, see the attachments at the bottom of this page.  Dave’s ESL Café has warm-up and getting-to-know you activities.  Search “getting to know you” at Dave’s ESL Café, or use one of these examples:

http://www.eslcafe.com/idea/index.cgi?display:913439307-2220.txt

http://www.eslcafe.com/idea/index.cgi?display:913439485-2349.txt

http://www.eslcafe.com/idea/index.cgi?display:947498913-22273.txt

For more ideas, check out the online, interactive goal-setting issue of "The Learning Edge."

Finally, here are some additional resources so that you and your students can meet your goals:

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Catherine Howell,
Nov 20, 2012, 3:07 PM
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Literacy Source,
May 18, 2010, 2:19 PM
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Literacy Source,
May 18, 2010, 2:19 PM
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Literacy Source,
May 18, 2010, 2:18 PM
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Literacy Source,
May 18, 2010, 2:17 PM
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Literacy Source,
May 18, 2010, 2:18 PM
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Literacy Source,
May 18, 2010, 2:20 PM
ĉ
Catherine Howell,
Nov 20, 2012, 3:07 PM
Ċ
Literacy Source,
May 18, 2010, 2:20 PM
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