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Lincoln's Father's Farm

Lincoln Log Cabin State Historic Site in Lerna (www.lincolnlogcabin.org) preserves the 19th century home of Thomas and Sarah Bush Lincoln, father and stepmother of our 16th president. A working, living history farm has been developed around the cabin, and a second historic farmstead, that of Stephen and Nancy Sargent, has been moved to the site to help broaden visitors’ understanding both of life in the 19th century and Lincoln’s legal practice in the community. The site also includes the Moore Home, where Lincoln bid farewell to his family in 1861 before leaving to assume the Presidency, and the grave sites of Thomas and Sarah Lincoln at the Thomas Lincoln Cemetery. Saturday, April 29, 10-4:00 is the all-day Sheep to Clothing event where visitors can watch sheep shearing, wool preparation, spinning, and weaving that results in “jean cloth” for Abe Lincoln’s pants.  In September, celebrate the arrival of spring at the Harvest Frolic on Saturday and Sunday. The free event lets visitors experience all aspects of 19th century farm life with games to play, artisans to see, and music to hear.



Thomas Lincoln Cemetery

South 4th street /off of South Lincoln Highway Road. Lerna

(217) 345-1845 www.lincolnlogcabin.org
Many visit this cemetery to see the burial site of Abraham Lincoln’s father and stepmother, Thomas Lincoln and Sarah Bush Lincoln.



Moore Home State Historic Site

South 4th Street/ South Lincoln Highway Road, Lerna

(217) 345-1845 www.lincolnlogcabin.org
Located just one mile north of Lincoln Log Cabin, the Moore Home is the 1860’s home of Abraham Lincoln's stepsister, Matilda Hall Moore and the location of President-elect Lincoln’s last visit with his Coles County family on January 31, 1861.



Old City Cemetery and Chambers Cemetery

Corner of Madison and ‘E’ Street

(217) 348-0430

Discover the graves of Charleston’s earliest residents among which include Lincoln’s extended family, local friends and victims of the 1864 Charleston Riot. The cemetery sits across the street from the Lincoln Douglas Debate Museum.

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