ACUMEN  
        The Art and Science of Learning Craft  


 



Judgments of Learning ( J.O.L )


A persons estimate as to how well he learned some thing is called the Judgements of Learning.

 


Nelson and Dunlosky (1991) researched and found that judgments of learning (JOLs) were “Extremely accurate" when the JOL was "delayed...rather than being made immediately after study."
Even after a short delay people were good judges of how well they had learned something. But they were not so accurate when asked immediately after reading something. 

The JOL concept definitely is relevant to students. They need to judge their own learning to decide whether they need to reread or to move on to next task.

If one wants to judge his own learning, one must wait for a minute or two after you he has studied something. Turn his attention to something different. After emptying his primary memory, go back to his study material and ask himself if he remembered  what he was just studying.

If this is not made, a person can get the impression, he or she has learned something because the material lingers in working memory. That feeling can be misleading. Only by clearing out working memory and then interrogating long-term memory can one determine if one has learned something.

A persons estimate as to how well he learned some thing is called the Judgements of Learning.
 
 


Nelson and Dunlosky (1991) researched and found that judgments of learning (JOLs) were “Extremely accurate" when the JOL was "delayed...rather than being made immediately after study."
Even after a short delay people were good judges of how well they had learned something. But they were not so accurate when asked immediately after reading something.

The JOL concept definitely is relevant to students. They need to judge their own learning to decide whether they need to reread or to move on to next task.

If one wants to judge his own learning, one must wait for a minute or two after you he has studied something. Turn his attention to something different. After emptying his primary memory, go back to his study material and ask himself if he remembered  what he was just studying.

If this is not made, a person can get the impression, he or she has learned something because the material lingers in working memory. That feeling can be misleading. Only by clearing out working memory and then interrogating long-term memory can one determine if one has learned something.

The Above 6 paragraphs are repeated, what is our reaction? 

Do we reread the paras repeated ?

we seldom do.

The moment we notice that we have already seen the thing, we think there must be a mistake and try to correct it by skipping the matter by scrolling down.

That is what the effect of J. O. L is. As long as we think we have already learned some thing, while rereading the same material, we do not learn anything anew.

                                                                                   rt term Memory
 




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