Largest Known Human Penis

    human penis
  • The penis (plural penises, penes) is an external sexual organ of certain biologically male animals, in both vertebrates and invertebrates. It is a reproductive, intromittent organ that additionally serves as the urinal duct in placental mammals.
    largest
  • Of considerable or relatively great size, extent, or capacity
  • Pursuing an occupation or commercial activity on a significant scale
  • Jupiter is not only the most massive planet in the solar system, but it may be one of the most influential as well. in LARGEST, NASA takes a close look at Jupiter, and considers its scientific and poetic place in the solar system.
  • Of greater size than the ordinary, esp. with reference to a size of clothing or to the size of a packaged commodity
largest known human penis
IMG 8825
IMG 8825
Detail of East face of deerstone adjusted to maximize contrast. This deerstone was our first on this trip. It has been newley reerected just next to the highway bewteen Ulaan Baatar and Tsetserleg, just before Tsetserleg. This face shows five large and one small reindeer flying up and to the left with infolded legs, the "sporran" (not shown) and a line of dots. While the exact meaning of deerstones is still debated, they are clearly totemic markers with shamanic content, symbolizing simultaneously a stylized human form, the sacred cosmos and the fertilizing phallus. The Forest God in the Japanese Manga film "Princess Mononoke" give a good idea of what the deerstone represent. They are not grave markers, though some are associated with (later?/contemporary?) Khirig Sur (kurgan) burials. Almost all have highly stylized bird-reindeer with open beaks and baroque horns, flying between earth and heaven, which also represent tattoos or embroidery, a belt which also represents the earth, suns that double as ears, a line of dots that demarcate both the heavens and the glans of the penis, and an enigmatic sporran--which may be a shield or shamanic cloak or bag. Most deerstones were erected, as here, on South-facing bluffs overlooking rivers, where they would be both visible and in position to influence the fertility of the valley. The blue cloth indicates that someone still considers this deerstone sacred. Bronze Age (recently dates have crept earlier to roughly 1300 BC - 700 BC). When I first came to Mongolia in the 1990s, deerstones were considered rare. That situation has since changed radically. The later builders of Square Tombs loved deerstones for their sacred power and would drag them a long way to use as the walls and covers of their tombs (as many as 11 deerstones per tomb). As a result, now that Square Tombs are being excavated regularly, more than 700 deerstones are known. I'd estimate at least 2000 deertsones survive in Mongolia in Square Tombs. This large number indicates that they may hae been clan specific and that they were erected at fairly frequent intervals (e.g. after an eclipse or on the death of a ruler).face shows five reindeer flying up, the sun and a line of dots. While the exact meaning of deerstones is still debated, they are clearly totemic markers with shamanic content, symbolizing simultaneously a stylized human form, the sacred cosmos and the fertilizing phallus. The Forest God in the Japanese Manga film "Princess Mononoke" give a good idea of what the deerstone represent. They are not grave markers, though some are associated with (later?/contemprary?) Khirig Sur (kurgan) burials. Almost all have highly stylized bird-reindeer with open beaks and baroque horns, flying between earth and heaven, which also represent tattoos or embroidery, a belt which also represents the earth, suns that double as ears, a line of dots that demarcate both the heavens and the glans of the penis, and an enigmatic sporran--which may be a shield or shamanic cloak or bag. Most deerstones were erected, as here, on South-facing bluffs overlooking rivers, where they would be both visible and in position to influence the fertility of the valley. The blue cloth indicates that someone still considers this deerstone sacred. Bronze Age (recently dates have crept earlier to roughly 1300 BC - 700 BC). When I first came to Mongolia in the 1990s, deerstones were considered rare. That situation has since changed radically. The later builders of Square Tombs loved deerstones for their sacred power and would drag them a long way to use as the walls and covers of their tombs (as many as 11 deerstones per tomb). As a result, now that Square Tombs are being excavated regularly, more than 700 deerstones are known. I'd estimate at least 2000 deertsones survive in Mongolia in Square Tombs. This large number indicates that they may hae been clan specific and that they were erected at fairly frequent intervals (e.g. after an eclipse or on the death of a ruler). reindeer flying up and to the left with infolded legs, the "sporran" (not shown) and a line of dots. While the exact meaning of deerstones is still debated, they are clearly totemic markers with shamanic content, symbolizing simultaneously a stylized human form, the sacred cosmos and the fertilizing phallus. The Forest God in the Japanese Manga film "Princess Mononoke" give a good idea of what the deerstone represent. They are not grave markers, though some are associated with (later?/contemprary?) Khirig Sur (kurgan) burials. Almost all have highly stylized bird-reindeer with open beaks and baroque horns, flying between earth and heaven, which also represent tattoos or embroidery, a belt which also represents the earth, suns that double as ears, a line of dots that demarcate both the heavens and the glans of the penis, and an enigmatic sporran--which may be a shield or shamanic cloak or bag. Most deerstones were erected, as h
IMG 0523
IMG 0523
Detail of top of south face (corresponding to the human face) of Large, grey granite deerstone (Bronze Age) excavated and reerected by Jerome Magail. A very large round Khirig sur (kurgan) visible to the north east. Near the bottom, a belt with a zig-zag motif (in some typologies, the second in status--the highest status being chevrons. On the south face, below the belt a sword, lying on its side. Above the belt, four large reindeer flying vertically up, their legs extended and to the right. Above them a small reindeer, legs extended, flying up and to the right crossing from the west side to the south side. Above the reindeer, a line of dots. On the curve between the south and west face, three small reindeer flying vertically up, legs extended to the right. On the west face, below the belt, a sword, hilt to the right, hanging from the belt. Above the belt, four large reindeer flying vertically up, legs extended to the right. Above the line of dots, the sun with two down-projecting rays and the moon to the upper left at about 10 o'clock. Possibly a second smaller circle to the left of the moon. The north face of the deerstone is very narrow, so the deerstone is wedge-shaped in section. On the north face, below the belt, a bow, above the belt, a sporran or shield, four small reindeer flying up and to the right, legs folded. The topmost reindeer crosses onto the west face. On the east face, below the belt, a sword, hilt to the left. Above the belt, a mirror disk, five large reindeer flying vertically up, legs extended to the right. Above the line of dots, the sun. The upper portion with the moon is chipped away. It is located far up a wide valley north of the Tamir. The valley is currently dry in the summer, but has an arroyo with water in the winter. In the moister Bronze-Age climate, the stream may have flowed year round, so the deerstone may have been associated with running water. The deerstone is associated with a very large Khirig Sur (Kurgans) and has several stone circles marking sacrifices of horse heads. Tsatsyn Denj Deerstones on the bluffs North of the Tamir River in association with many later monuments. Many of the deerstones were reused as walls in Square tombs. Recent excavations by the Monaco mission under the direction of Jerome Magail have reerected many of these and we were able to see 43 in the area (two have been moved to Ulaan Baatar) Originally, the valley must have been lined with hundreds of deerstones with several on every point in the bluffs. While the exact meaning of deerstones is still debated, they are clearly totemic markers with shamanic content, symbolizing simultaneously a stylized human form, the sacred cosmos and the fertilizing phallus. The Forest God in the Japanese Manga film "Princess Mononoke" give a good idea of what the deerstone represent. They are not grave markers, though some are associated with (later?/contemporary?) Khirig Sur (kurgan) burials. Almost all have highly stylized bird-reindeer with open beaks and baroque horns, flying between earth and heaven, which also represent tattoos or embroidery, a belt which also represents the earth, suns that double as ears, a line of dots that demarcate both the heavens and the glans of the penis, and an enigmatic sporran--which may be a shield or shamanic cloak or bag. Weapons (sword, bow--sometimes drawn, with arrow--, quiver or bow case, axe, dagger) are also common. Most deerstones were erected on South-facing bluffs overlooking rivers, as here over the Tamir, where they would be both visible and in position to influence the fertility of the valley. Today, each family has its deerstone or group of deerstones, which they usually protect (though one family was using theirs as the roof of a dog house). Bronze Age (recently dates have crept earlier to roughly 1300 BC - 700 BC). When I first came to Mongolia in the 1990s, deerstones were considered rare. That situation has since changed radically. The later builders of Square Tombs loved deerstones for their sacred power and would drag them a long way to use as the walls and covers of their tombs (as many as 11 deerstones per tomb). As a result, now that Square Tombs are being excavated regularly, more than 700 deerstones are known. I'd estimate at least 2000 deertsones survive in Mongolia in Square Tombs. This large number indicates that they may hae been clan specific and that they were erected at fairly frequent intervals (e.g. after an eclipse or on the death of a ruler). Tsatsyn Denj, Tamir River Valley, Battsengel Sum, Arkhangai Aimag, Mongolia.