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Episode 9. The most beautiful city

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Vocabulary :

space (n)
2. (dt) khoảng trống; chỗ
(no plural) room
3. (dt) khoảng trống; khoảng; chỗ; nơi

igloo (n)
1. (dt) nhà tuyết (của người Et-ki-mô)
a house built by the Inuit (Eskimos) made from blocks of hard snow. 

 Episode Note

1. Comparing Two Things - 2. Liking / Not Likings - 3. Would Like To

Episode 9. The most beautiful city
Source:http://australianetwork.com
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They have lunch and talk about differences.

STEVE So Anne, have you been to an Australian home before?

ANNE No, never. It's a beautiful home Sarah. So big! The rooms are much bigger than at home. There's more space here.

STEVE Do you live in a house?

MARK No Steve – she lives in an igloo.

ANNE Actually, no. We live in an apartment. Most people do. Singapore is much busier than Adelaide, and more crowded.

STEVE Yeah, and more exciting. It's so boring here.

SARAH It's quieter. Some people like that.

ANNE I don't think it's boring.

MARK Adelaide is a very beautiful city. It's a better place to live than anywhere else I've been.

SARAH But you haven't been anywhere. (to ANNE) Mark hates travelling. I love it.

MARK I just don't see the point of it.

ANNE What about you Steve? Do you like to travel?

STEVE Yes. Yeah, I've been to Kula Lumpur, and to Bali. Bali's great!

LOUISE I've been to the zoo!
They laugh. ANNE smiles

ANNE You're lucky. I haven't been to the zoo. I'd love to go to the zoo.

STEVE I'll take you!
There are raised eyebrows at the table.



EPISODE NOTES

1. Comparing Two Things - 2. Liking / Not Likings - 3. Would Like To

1. COMPARING TWO THINGS

Adjectives are words we use to describe things.
This is a small dog.
The adjective is small. It describes the dog.

When we are comparing two things we use a comparative adjective. This is formed by adding er to the adjective.
This dog is smaller than that one.

ANNE
It's a beautiful home Sarah. So big! The rooms are much bigger than at home.

If an adjective ends in e, just add r.
large / larger
Your house is larger than mine.

Adjectives which end in a single consonant, double that consonant before adding er.
big / bigger
; thin / thinner; fat / fatter
Adjectives which end in y change the y to an i before adding er.
busy / busier; lucky / luckier


For words with three or more syllables, and some words with two syllables, add more before the adjective.
beautiful / more beautiful
She is more beautiful than her sister.
crowded / more crowded
Sydney is more crowded than Melbourne.

ANNE
Singapore is much busier than Adelaide, and more crowded.

STEVE
Yeah, and more exciting. It's so boring here.

Notice that we add the word than after the adjective when comparing two things.
This book is more interesting than that one.

ANNE
The rooms are much bigger than at home.

Two comparative adjectives are irregular. They are very common words.
good / better
Your exam results this year are better than mine.
bad / worse

My results are worse than yours.

MARK
Adelaide is a very beautiful city. It's a better place to live than anywhere else I've been.
2. LIKING / NOT LIKING

We use like and love to describe things positively.
You can say that you like something or somebody.
I like dogs.
I like Josie.


To say this more strongly, we can add very much or really.
I like dogs very much.
I really like Josie.

Or to say it even more strongly, we can use love.
I love dogs.
I love Josie very much.

We can also say that we like, or love doing things.
I like swimming.
I love going to the beach.

The opposite is not liking.
We say don't like.
I don't like John.

To make this less blunt, we can use very much.
I don't like John very much.
To make a very strong statement we use hate.
I hate dogs.

This is a very strong statement, and you need to be careful when using the word hate in case you offend someone.

You can also use don't like and hate with verbs.
I don't like travelling.
I hate running.


SARAH
Mark hates travelling. I love it.
   
3. WOULD LIKE TO

You can use the expression would like (or love) to to talk about things you want to do.
I would like to go to Japan.
I would love to see an elephant.


Usually we say and write I'd for I would.
I'd love to go to Japan.

I would
he would
she would
we would
you would
they would

I’d
he’d
she’d
we’d
you’d
they’d


ANNE
I'd love to go to the zoo.

The opposite is would not, which is shortened to wouldn't.
I wouldn't like to have an accident.

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