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Episode 8. This is my brother

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Vocabulary :

change (n)   
2. (dt) tiền lẻ
(no plural) the money that you get back after you pay your bill

toward(s) (prep)
1. (gt) hướng đến
in the direction of 

 pretend (v)
1. (đt) làm bộ; làm ra vẻ
try to make something appear to be true
He pretended not to hear.
2. (đt) giả vờ
imagine that something is true 

pain (n)
1. (dt) sự đau đớn, sự đau khổ (thể chất, tinh thần)
something that hurts you

back (adj)
1. (tt) đằng sau; sau; hậu
farthest away from the front
The tallest pupils sit in the back row.
2. (tt) đã qua; cũ
earlier in time; belonging to the past
back numbers of the magazine.
back (adv)
1. (tr) đằng sau
behind 

kid (v)
1. (đt) đùa, lừa phỉnh
(informal) joke
 [kidded, kidding]
He's only kidding. 

 pick up (v)
2. (đt) đến đón ai
come and get someone at a certain place and time
  I'll pick you up at your house at 7:30.

Episode Note 

1. Paying

2. Rooms

3. Possessive Pronouns
4. Relations & Family

Episode 8. This is my brother
Source:http://australianetwork.com
(download)

ANNE goes to SARAH’s house for lunch.
ANNE arrives in a taxi.


TAXI-DRIVER Here we are.

ANNE How much is that?

TAXI-DRIVER That’ll be seventeen-fifty thanks love.
She gives him twenty dollars

ANNE Keep the change.

TAXI-DRIVER Thankyou. Have a nice day.
ANNE walks towards the house and knocks.
The door is opened by a little girl (LOUISE).

ANNE Hello. I’m Anne.

Louise turns and runs.

LOUISE Mummy!
SARAH comes to the door.

SARAH Come in Anne!

ANNE What a beautiful house!

SARAH It’s been a lot of work, but we’re getting there. This is the bathroom. This is my daughter’s bedroom. And here’s the kitchen.
Louise is in the kitchen ‘helping’.

SARAH Anne’s here. You’ve met my daughter Louise.

ANNE Hello Louise.

LOUISE I’m helping.

ANNE Yes, I see…

SARAH And my husband Mark.

ANNE Hello again.
Mark pretends to have a pain in the back.

ANNE Ooh! Sorry about my heavy bag.

MARK Just kidding.

SARAH But you haven’t met my little brother. This is Steve.

STEVE I was going to pick you up this morning. You wouldn’t let me.

ANNE I’m sorry. I like to find my own way around.

STEVE No worries. Maybe another time.

ANNE
Yes, maybe

SARAH
Come on. Let’s go outside. 


EPISODE NOTES

1. Paying - 2. Rooms - 3. Possessive Pronouns - 4. Relations & Family

1. PAYING

To ask about what you have to pay:
How much is that?
or
What do I owe you?

ANNE
How much is that?

If you are pointing to something or holding something, say:
How much is this?

The person will reply:
That is ten dollars.
or
That’s ten dollars.
or
That will be ten dollars.
or
That'll be ten dollars.


TAXI-DRIVER
That’ll be seventeen-fifty thanks love.

We say the number of dollars and then the number of cents.
That'll be five dollars and sixty cents.
We often say
That'll be five dollars sixty.
or sometimes just
That'll be five-sixty
.

TAXI-DRIVER
That’ll be seventeen-fifty thanks love.

The amount of money we pay is called the price.
The price of the ticket is twenty dollars.
The amount we pay to ride in a train, taxi or bus is called the fare.
I need money for my bus fare.

If you give ten dollars for something that costs eight dollars, the two dollars you are given back is the change.
Can I have two dollar coins in my change please.

In Australia, we don’t normally give a tip (or extra money). But for waiters, or taxi-drivers, you can say:
Keep the change.

ANNE
How much is that?

TAXI-DRIVER
That’ll be seventeen-fifty thanks love.

She gives him twenty dollars

ANNE
Keep the change.

   
2. ROOMS

The rooms of a house are:
 

bedroom

loungeroom
sitting room
living room

dining room

bathroom

kitchen

toilet

laundry


   
3. POSSESSIVE PRONOUNS

Possessive pronouns show who owns or has something
I is the subject pronoun.
I own a car.
Me is the object pronoun.
The car belongs to me.
My is the possessive adjective.
It is my car.
Mine is the possessive pronoun.
The car is mine.

SARAH
This is my daughter’s bedroom.

He is the subject pronoun.
He owns a car.
Him is the object pronoun.
The car belongs to him.
His is the possessive pronoun and possessive adjective.
It is his car.
The car is his.

She is the subject pronoun.
She owns a car.
Her is the object pronoun.
The car belongs to her.
The possessive adjective is her.
It is her car.
The possessive pronoun is hers.
The car is hers.

It is the pronoun.
It has a tail.
The possessive form is its.
Its tail is long.

You is the pronoun.
You own a car.
The car belongs to you.
The possessive adjective is your.
It is your car.
The possessive pronoun is yours.
The car is yours.

We is the subject pronoun.
We own a car.
Us is the object pronoun.
The car belongs to us.
The possessive adjective is our.
It is our car.
The possessive pronoun is ours.
The car is ours.

They is the subject pronoun.
They own a car.
Them is the object pronoun.
The car belongs to them.
The possessive adjective is their.
It is their car.
The possessive pronoun is theirs.
The car is theirs.

Sometimes we emphasise a possessive form by saying own after it.
He has his own room.
She has her own car.
I paid with my own money.


ANNE
I like to find my own way around.
4. RELATIONS AND FAMILY

Married man = husband.
Married woman = wife.
A husband and wife who have one child or some children are called parents.

A male child is called a boy. A boy is a son of his parents.
A female child is called a girl. A girl is a daughter of her parents.
The male parent is the children’s father.
The female parent is the children’s mother.
They are both the children’s parents.

Children of the same parents can be called sisters or brothers. Sisters are female, and brothers are male.

The brothers and sisters of your parents are your uncles and your aunts (or aunties).

The children of your uncles and aunts are your cousins.

The children of your brothers and sisters are your nephews (boys) or nieces (girls).

The parents of your parents are your grandparents. They are your grandfather and your grandmother. Their parents are your great grandparents.

You are your grandparents’ grandson or granddaughter.

Your relatives by marriage are your in-laws.
Your wife’s mother, or your husband’s mother, is your mother-in-law.
Your wife’s father, or your husband’s father, is your father-in-law.
Your wife’s brother, or your husband’s brother, is your brother-in-law.

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