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Episode 10. What's the matter?

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 Vocabulary :

secret (adj)
1. (tt) bí mật, thầm kín, kín đáo
that people don't know about 

mission (n)
2. (dt) sứ mệnh, nhiệm vụ
the purpose for which a person or group is sent somewhere

concerned (adj)
1. (tt) lo âu, băn khoăn
worried
 He is very concerned about his health. 

guess (v)
1. (đt) đoán
give an answer you hope is right but you are not sure
  Can you guess who wrote this song?

 

Episode Note

1. Apologising - 2. Showing Concern - 3.Present Perfect - 4. Past Participle - 5. Agreeing & Disagreeing - 6. For, Since, Ago

Episode 10. What's the matter?
Source:http://australianetwork.com
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ANNE finds out SARAH’s secret mission.

 SARAH I’m sorry about my brother. 

ANNE Not at all. You have a lovely family. Everyone seems so happy.
ANNE breaks down in tears. SARAH goes to her, concerned.
 

SARAH Anne! What’s the matter?

ANNE There’s something I haven’t told you.

SARAH What is it?

ANNE When I met your brother, I was thinking about my brother, David. I haven’t seen him in two years.

SARAH How come?

ANNE He’s missing. One reason I came to Australia is to find him. 

SARAH I’m so sorry. Have you had any luck?

ANNE Not yet. I’ve hired a private investigator.

SARAH Goodness! Do you think he’ll find him?

ANNE Perhaps. I don’t know. It’s been a long time since David last called.

SARAH What do you think’s happened to him? Have you any idea?

ANNE I really don’t know. I can’t help thinking the worst.

SARAH I’m sure he’s alright. If something bad had happened, you would have heard.

ANNE I guess so. I suppose you’re right.
But ANNE doesn’t look convinced. 


EPISODE NOTES

1. Apologising - 2. Showing Concern - 3.Present Perfect - 4. Past Participle - 5. Agreeing & Disagreeing - 6. For, Since, Ago

1. APOLOGISING

When we think we have done something wrong we apologise by saying sorry.
I’m sorry that we made so much noise last night.

We also use sorry to show sympathy.
I was sorry to hear that you lost your job.

ANNE
He’s missing. One reason I came to Australia is to find him.

SARAH
I’m so sorry. Have you had any luck?

To reply to someone who has said sorry, we say, Don’t mention it, Not at all or That’s alright.
I’m sorry my son broke your window.
That’s alright. I’m sure it was an accident.

Sorry about the mess.
Don’t mention it.

I’m sorry about the trouble.
Not at all.

SARAH
I’m sorry about my brother.

ANNE
Not at all. You have a lovely family.
   
2. SHOWING CONCERN

Here are some of the phrases we use when we want to find why someone is upset.
What’s the matter?
What’s wrong?
What’s the problem?


SARAH
Anne! What’s the matter?
   
3. PRESENT PERFECT

We use the present perfect tense to describe an action started in the past that is still true.
She has worked hard. (She has worked hard in the past and works hard now)
I have lost my keys. (the keys were lost in the past and are still lost)

Present perfect is made from the verb have and the past participle of another verb.

We use have with plural nouns and has with singular nouns.
The frogs have started croaking.
The frog has started croaking.


This is how have is used with pronouns.
I have
she has
he has
it has
we have
they have
you have


Usually we shorten them like this.
I’ve
she’s
he’s
it’s
we’ve
they’ve
you’ve


ANNE
I’ve hired a private investigator.

We also use the negative have not or haven't to talk about something not being done in the past and still not being done.
I have not met him.
I haven't met him.


ANNE
There’s something I haven’t told you.
   
4. PAST PARTICIPLE

The past participle of a verb is the one we use with have / has and is / are.
It is usually the same as the regular past tense ending with 'ed', such as worked or started.
I have worked hard.
She has started work.

Sometimes irregular verbs have past participles that are different to the past tense.

For example, the past tense of see is saw, but the past participle is seen.
I see you. (present)
I saw you yesterday. (past)
I’ve seen you many times. (past participle making a present perfect tense)

ANNE
I haven’t seen him in two years.
   
5. AGREEING & DISAGREEING
  Here are some phrases we use when we agree or disagree with what someone has said.
 

Agree Strongly

Agree

Not Sure

Disagree

Definitely

I think so

maybe

definitely not

I’m sure

I guess so

possibly

I don’t think so

 

I suppose so

perhaps

 

   

SARAH
I’m sure he’s alright. If something bad had happened, you would have heard.

ANNE
I guess so. I suppose you’re right.

SARAH
Goodness! Do you think he’ll find him?

ANNE
Perhaps. I don’t know.
   
6. FOR, SINCE, AGO
  These words are all used to talk about time.

For is used for a period of time that something goes on.
I’ve been working for hours.
I’ll do the job for a year.
I fed his dog for a week.


Since is a specific time in the past.
I haven’t seen you since Monday.
I’ve been working since 10 o’clock.
The pipe has been leaking since yesterday.


ANNE
It’s been a long time since David last called.

Ago refers to a length of time before the present.
I saw you a week ago.
That happened a year ago.
It’s 10 o’clock. You were supposed to be here an hour ago, at 9 o’clock.

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