Invictus Interpretive Essay Drafts 1,2, & 3

Invictus Interpretive Essay Draft 3

 

     The poem Invictus describes a person that is unconquerable, the meaning of Invictus. He or she has become unconquerable through all of the experience that they have gotten from bloody experiences . Although the outcome of the character in the poem turns out as victory, with his/her powers coming from the gods, he/she still knows that he/she are masters of his/her own fate. The gods who gave him or her the powers to attain the ability to be unconquerable are not the ones who can control the fate of Invictus, who is the one with the unconquerable soul. "I thank whatever gods may be for my unconquerable soul." The poem also contains a central metaphor, which shows a comparison involving the victorious soul of the character. 

    Invictus is a metaphor, which is comparing someone who was granted with an unconquerable soul who does not give up or surrender, with the meaning of never giving up or quitting. William Ernest Henley depicts these words saying how traveling through the shade and its horrors, the character was unafraid.

    The story of this poem is about a person who, no matter what, would not surrender, even if there was great pain they had to undergo. “Under the bludgeonings of chance my head is bloody, but unbowed.” Through experience, the character has learned that no matter what we are learned and taught, we are the only people who can be the masters of our own fate. “It matters not how straight the gate, how charged with punishments the scroll, I am the master of my fate: I am the captain of my soul.”

    The main character, in the first stanza, is thanking the gods for his/her powers and unconquerable soul in war. The destruction he caused, is described, in the poem, as “Out of the night that covers me, black as the Pit from pole to pole.” Stanza two is extending the meaning of the first stanza because Henley speaks through the person and is saying how, in the worst of circumstances, they never showed mercy or any sign of weakness. “In the fell clutch of circumstance, I have not winced nor cried aloud.”

            In stanza three, lines 12-15, it states “Beyond this place of wrath and tears, looms but the Horrors of the shade, and yet the menace of the years finds, and shall find, me unafraid.” This passage means that even after this woeful and sad place, there lies but another world which is dark, mysterious, and terrifying. However, with the powers received from the gods, the person finds that they are yet not scared or terrified.

            The fourth stanza is different, though, than the others, for it describes not the potency that the character possesses, but of his knowledge that things like these should not make one change their future or their destiny. Nor should anything besides one’s-self be the very thing to change their own fate.

 





Invictus Interpretive Essay Draft 2

 

     The poem Invictus describes a person that is unconquerable, the meaning of Invictus. He or she has become unconquerable through all of the experience that they have gotten from bloody experiences . Although the outcome of the character in the poem turns out as victory, with his/her powers coming from the gods, he/she still knows that he/she are masters of his/her own fate. The gods who gave him or her the powers to attain the ability to be unconquerable are not the ones who can control the fate of Invictus, who is the one with the unconquerable soul. "I thank whatever gods may be for my unconquerable soul." The poem also contains a central metaphor, which shows a comparison involving the victorious soul of the character. good thesis statement -Grant Hogoboom 3/6/09 12:15 PM 

    Invictus is a metaphor, which is comparing someone who was granted with an unconquerable soul who does not give up or surrender, with the meaning of never giving up or quitting. William Ernest Henley depicts these words saying how traveling through the shade and its horrors, the character was unafraid.

    The story of this poem is about a person who, no matter what, would not surrender, even if there was great pain they had to undergo. “Under the bludgeonings of chance my head is bloody, but unbowed.” Through experience, the character has learned that no matter what we are learned and taught, we are the only people who can be the masters of our own fate. “It matters not how straight the gate, how charged with punishments the scroll, I am the master of my fate: I am the captain of my soul.”

    The main character, in the first stanza, is thanking the gods for his/her powers and unconquerable soul in war. The destruction he caused, is described, in the poem, as “Out of the night that covers me, black as the Pit from pole to pole.” Stanza two is extending the meaning of the first stanza because Henley speaks through the person and is saying how, in the worst of circumstances, they never showed mercy or any sign of weakness. “In the fell clutch of circumstance, I have not winced nor cried aloud.” Good usage of quotes -Grant Hogoboom 3/6/09 12:10 PM 

            In stanza three, lines 12-15, it states “Beyond this place of wrath and tears, looms but the Horrors of the shade, and yet the menace of the years finds, and shall find, me unafraid.” This passage means that even after this woeful and sad place, there lies but another world which is dark, mysterious, and terrifying. However, with the powers received from the gods, the person finds that they are yet not scared or terrified.

            The fourth stanza is different, though, than the others, for it describes not the potency that the character possesses, but of his knowledge that things like these should not make one change their future or their destiny. Nor should anything besides one’s-self be the very thing to change their own fate.

Overall this is a good interpretive essay. All people have different interpretations of this poem.





Invictus Interpretive Essay Draft 1

 

          The poem Invictus describes a person that is unconquerable, the meaning of invictus. He or she has become unconquerable through all of the experience that they have gotten from bloody experiences Using experience a little to much-Kenneth Hudson 2/23/09 12:41 PM . Although the outcome for  (use "of") the character in the poem turns out as victory, with their (his or her; it's not plural) powers coming from the gods, they (he or she; NOT plural) still knows that they (he or she)are masters of their (her or his) fate. The gods who gave him or her the powers to attain the ability to be unconquerable are not the ones who can control the fate of Invictus.Who is "invictus"? What does this last sentence mean, it is confusing, chang the wording like "The gods who gave the writer the unconquerable soul can not control  him or her"  Also site some tect, you say he has powers but you have to support it with TEXT!-Kenneth Hudson 2/23/09 12:47 PM 

            Invictus is a metaphor, which is comparing someone who was granted with an unconquerable soul who does not give up or surrender, with the meaning of never giving up or quitting. This should probably go into the intro paragraph because it is like another thesis -Kenneth Hudson 2/23/09 12:50 PM William Ernest Henley depicts these words saying how traveling through the shade and its horrors, he or she (the character)  was unafraid.

    The story of this poem is about a person who, no matter what, would not surrender, even if there was great pain they had to undergo. “Under the bludgeonings of chance my head is bloody, but unbowed.” Through experience, the character has learned that no matter what we are learned and taught, we are the only people who can be the masters of our own fate. “It matters not how straight the gate, how charged with punishments the scroll, I am the master of my fate: I am the captain of my soul.”Good i like the use of text in here -Kenneth Hudson 2/23/09 12:52 PM 

            The main character, in the first stanza, is thanking the gods for his/her powers and unconquerable soul in war. The destruction he caused, is described, in the poem, as “Out of the night that covers me, black as the Pit from pole to pole.” Stanza two is extending the meaning of the first stanza because Henley speaks through the person and is saying how, in the worst of circumstances, they never showed mercy or any sign of weakness. “In the fell clutch of circumstance, I have not winced nor cried aloud.”It is starting to get a little bit out of order, try to put like your interpretation of the first stanza in the beginning like after the first or second paragraph and the paragraph about the last stanza at the end -Kenneth Hudson 2/23/09 12:53 PM 

            In stanza three, lines 12-5 TWELVE THrough Five?, it says “Beyond this place of wrath and tears, looms but the Horrors of the shade, and yet the menace of the years finds, and shall find, me unafraid.” This passage means that even after this woeful and sad place, there lies but another world which is dark, mysterious, and terrifying. However, with the powers Im a little unsure on the powers, unconquerable soul fits better, the poem never says he has "powers" -Kenneth Hudson 2/24/09 3:37 PM received from the gods, the person finds that they (he or she)  are yet not scared or terrified.

            The fourth stanza is different, though, than the others, for it describes not the potency that the character possesses, but of his knowledge that things like these should not make one change their future or their destiny. Nor should anything besides one’s-self be the very thing to change their own fate. the conclusion is a little weak  -Kenneth Hudson 2/24/09 3:39 PM

 try to be more convincing in your point, it is a little vague -Kenneth Hudson 2/24/09 3:51 PM 
 Good, you interpreted every part of the poem -Kenneth Hudson 2/24/09 3:42 PM

Good start, but it still needs a good amount of revising -Kenneth Hudson 2/24/09 3:39 PM 

 

 On a scale from one to six, i give your a 3.5 to a 4 -Kenneth Hudson 2/24/09 3:52 PM

 

 

Invictus

OUT of the night that covers me,

 

  Black as the Pit from pole to pole,

 

I thank whatever gods may be

 

  For my unconquerable soul.

 

  

 

In the fell clutch of circumstance

         5

  I have not winced nor cried aloud.

 

Under the bludgeonings of chance

 

  My head is bloody, but unbowed.

 

  

 

Beyond this place of wrath and tears

 

  Looms but the Horror of the shade,

  10

And yet the menace of the years

 

  Finds, and shall find, me unafraid.

 

  

 

It matters not how strait the gate,

 

  How charged with punishments the scroll,

 

I am the master of my fate:

  15

  I am the captain of my soul.



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