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Featured Career of the Week

FEATURED CAREER OF THE WEEK
Week of Sept 4-8
SOCIAL & COMMUNITY SERVICE MANAGERS


What Social and community service managers Do:
Social and community service managers coordinate and supervise social service programs and community organizations. They manage staff who provide social services to the public. Social and community service managers work for a variety of social and human service organizations. Some of these organizations focus on working with a particular demographic, such as children, people who are homeless, older adults, or veterans. Other such organizations focus on helping people with particular challenges, such as mental health needs, the presence of chronic hunger, and long-term unemployment.

Work Environment:
They work for nonprofit organizations, private for-profit social service companies, and government agencies. Social and community service managers work in a variety of settings, including offices, clinics, hospitals, and shelters.

How to Become a Social and community service manager:
A bachelor’s degree in social work, urban studies, public or business administration, public health, or a related field is the minimum requirement for most social and community service manager jobs. Many employers prefer candidates with a master’s degree. Coursework in statistics, program management, and policy analysis is considered helpful. 

Pay:
The median annual wage for social and community service managers was $64,680 in May 2016.

For more info CLICK HERE.

Week of June 12-16
GEOSCIENTISTS


What Geoscientists Do:
Geoscientists study the physical aspects of the Earth, such as its composition, structure, and processes, to learn about its past, present, and future.  Geoscientists use a wide variety of tools, both simple and complex. During a typical day in the field, they may use a hammer and chisel to collect rock samples and then use ground-penetrating radar equipment to search for oil or minerals. In laboratories, they may use x rays and electron microscopes to determine the chemical and physical composition of rock samples. They may also use remote sensing equipment to collect data, as well as geographic information systems (GIS) and modeling software to analyze the data collected.

Work Environment:
Most geoscientists split their time between working in offices and laboratories, and working outdoors. Doing research and investigations outdoors is commonly called fieldwork and can require extensive travel to remote locations and irregular working hours.  For example, oceanographers may spend months at sea on a research ship, and researchers studying advanced topics may need to collaborate with top scientists around the world. Extensive travel and long periods away from home can be physically and psychologically demanding.

How to Become a Geoscientist:
Geoscientists need at least a bachelor’s degree for most entry-level positions. However, some workers begin their careers as geoscientists with a master’s degree. A Ph.D. is necessary for most basic research and college teaching positions.  A degree in geoscience is preferred by employers, although a degree in physics, chemistry, biology, mathematics, engineering, or computer science usually is accepted if it includes coursework in geology.

Most geoscience programs include geology courses in mineralogy, petrology, and structural geology, which are important for all geoscientists. In addition to classes in geology, most programs require students to take courses in other physical sciences, mathematics, engineering, and computer science. Some programs include training on specific software packages that will be useful to those seeking a career as a geoscientist.

Computer knowledge is essential for geoscientists. Students who have experience with computer modeling, data analysis, and digital mapping will be the most prepared to enter the job market.

Pay:
The median annual wage for geoscientists was $89,780 in May 2016.

For more info CLICK HERE.


Week of June 5-9

HUMAN RESOURCES SPECIALISTS


What Human Resources Specialists Do:
Human resources specialists are often trained in all human resources disciplines and perform tasks throughout all areas of the department. In addition to recruiting and placing workers, human resources specialists help guide employees through all human resources procedures and answer questions about policies. They sometimes administer benefits, process payroll, and handle any associated questions or problems, although many specialists may focus more on strategic planning and hiring instead of administrative duties. They also ensure that all human resources functions comply with federal, state, and local regulations. 

Work Environment:
Human resources specialists generally work in offices. Some, particularly recruitment specialists, travel extensively to attend job fairs, visit college campuses, and meet with applicants. Most human resources specialists work full time during regular business hours.

How to Become a Human Resources Specialist:
Applicants must usually have a bachelor’s degree in human resources, business, or a related field. However, the level of education and experience required varies by position and employer. Coursework typically includes business, industrial relations, psychology, professional writing, human resource management, and accounting.

Pay:
The median annual wage for human resources specialists was $59,180 in May 2016.

For more info CLICK HERE.


Week of May 29-June2
SALES ENGINEERS


What Sales Engineers Do:
Sales engineers sell complex scientific and technological products or services to businesses. They must have extensive knowledge of the products’ parts and functions and must understand the scientific processes that make these products work.  Many of the duties of sales engineers are similar to those of other salespersons. They must interest the client in buying their products or services, negotiate a price, and complete the sale. To do this, sales engineers give technical presentations during which they explain the technical aspects of the product and how it will solve a specific customer problem.

Sales engineers often work under stressful conditions because their income and job security depend on successfully completing sales. Some sales engineers may work additional and irregular hours to meet sales goals and client needs.  Some sales engineers have large territories and travel extensively. Because sales regions may cover several states, sales engineers may be away from home for several days or even weeks at a time. Other sales engineers cover a smaller region and spend only a few nights away from home. International travel to secure contracts with foreign clients is becoming more common.

How to Become a Sales Engineer:
Successful sales engineers combine technical knowledge of the products or services they are selling with strong interpersonal skills. Sales engineers typically need a bachelor’s degree in engineering or a related field. However, a worker without a degree, but with previous sales experience as well as technical experience or training, sometimes holds the title of sales engineer. Workers who have a degree in a science, such as chemistry, or in business with little or no previous sales experience, also may be called sales engineers.

Pay:
The median annual wage for sales engineers was $100,000 in May 2016.

For more info CLICK HERE.

Week of May 22-May 26, 2017
SURVEY RESEARCHERS


What Survey Researchers Do:
Survey researchers design surveys and analyze data. Surveys are used to collect factual data, such as employment and salary information, or to ask questions in order to understand people’s opinions, preferences, beliefs, or desires.

Survey researchers design and conduct surveys for different research purposes. Surveys for scientific research cover various fields, including government, health, social sciences, and education. For example, a survey researcher may try to capture information about the prevalence of drug use or disease.

Work Environment:
Most survey researchers work in research firms, polling organizations, nonprofits, corporations, colleges and universities, and government agencies. The majority work full time during regular business hours.

How to Become a Survey Researcher:
Many research positions require a master’s degree or Ph.D., though a bachelor’s degree may be sufficient for some entry-level positions. In addition, employers generally prefer candidates who have previous experience performing research, using statistics, and analyzing data.

To prepare to enter this occupation, students should take courses in research methods, survey methodology, and statistics. Many also may benefit from taking business courses, such as marketing and consumer behavior, and social science courses, such as psychology, sociology, and economics. 

Pay:
The median annual wage for survey researchers was $54,470 in May 2016.

For more info CLICK HERE.

Week of May 15-May 19, 2017
GRAPHIC DESIGNERS


What Graphic designers do:
Graphic designers create visual concepts, using computer software or by hand, to communicate ideas that inspire, inform, and captivate consumers. They develop the overall layout and production design for various applications such as for advertisements, brochures, magazines, and corporate reports.

Graphic designers use digital illustration, photo-editing software and layout software to create the designs.  These designs can include logos, original images and illustrations to support a company's message.

Graphic designers generally work in studios where they have access to drafting tables, computers, and the software necessary to create their designs. Although many graphic designers work independently, those who work for specialized graphic design firms often work as part of a design team. Many graphic designers collaborate with colleagues or work with clients on projects.

How to Become a Graphic Designer:
Graphic designers usually need a bachelor’s degree in graphic design or a related field. Candidates for graphic design positions should demonstrate their creativity and originality through a professional portfolio that features their best designs.

High school students interested in graphic design should take basic art and design courses in high school, if the courses are available. Many bachelor's degree programs require students to complete a year of basic art and design courses before being admitted to a formal degree program. Some schools require applicants to submit sketches and other examples of their artistic ability.

Many programs provide students with the opportunity to build a professional portfolio of their designs. For many artists, including graphic designers, developing a portfolio—a collection of design ideas that demonstrates their styles and abilities—is essential because employers rely heavily on a designer’s portfolio in deciding whether to hire the individual.

Pay:
The median annual wage for graphic designers was $47,640 in May 2016. The median wage is the wage at which half the workers in an occupation earned more than that amount and half earned less. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $27,950, and the highest 10 percent earned more than $82,020.

For more info CLICK HERE.



Week of May 8-May 11, 2017
INDUSTRIAL DESIGNERS




What Industrial Designers do:
Industrial designers develop the concepts for manufactured products, such as cars, home appliances, and toys. They combine art, business, and engineering to make products that people use every day. Industrial designers consider the function, aesthetics, production costs, and the usability of products when developing new product concepts.  They consult with clients to determine requirements for designs as well as creating physical prototypes of the designs.

Work spaces for industrial designers often include work tables for sketching designs, meeting rooms with whiteboards for brainstorming with colleagues, and computers and other office equipment for preparing designs and communicating with clients. Although industrial designers work primarily in offices, they may travel to testing facilities, design centers, clients’ exhibit sites, users’ homes or workplaces, and places where the product is manufactured.  Most industrial designers work full time, and one in four (in 2014) were self-employed.

How to Become an Industrial Designer:
A bachelor’s degree in industrial design, architecture, or engineering is usually required for entry-level industrial design jobs. Most industrial design programs include courses that industrial designers need in design: drawing, computer-aided design and drafting (CADD), and three-dimensional modeling. Most programs will also include courses in business, industrial materials and processes, and manufacturing methods that industrial designers need when developing their design.

Some designers have a Master’s of Business Administration (MBA) degree which helps further develop a designer’s business skills. These skills help designers understand how to fit their designs to meet the cost limitations a firm may have for the production of a given product.


Pay:
The median annual wage for industrial designers was $67,790 in May 2016. The median wage is the wage at which half the workers in an occupation earned more than that amount and half earned less. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $37,400, and the highest 10 percent earned more than $105,690.

For more info CLICK HERE.

Week of May 1-5, 2017
PUBLIC RELATIONS AND FUNDRAISING MANAGERS



What PR and Fundraising Managers do:
Public relations managers plan and direct the creation of material that will maintain or enhance the public image of their employer or client. Fundraising managers coordinate campaigns that bring in donations for their organization.  They may write press releases and prepare information for the media in order to help their clients communicate effectively with the public.

Public relations and fundraising managers usually work in offices during regular business hours. However, many must travel to deliver speeches and attend meetings and community activities. They work in high-stress environments, often managing and organizing several events at the same time.

How to Become a PR and Fundraising Manager:
For public relations and fundraising management positions, a bachelor's degree in public relations, communications, English, fundraising, or journalism is generally required. However, some employers prefer a master’s degree, particularly in public relations, journalism, fundraising, or nonprofit management.

Courses in advertising, business administration, public affairs, public speaking, and creative and technical writing can be helpful.  Although not mandatory, public relations managers can get certified through the Public Relations Society of America. Candidates qualify based on years of experience and must pass an exam to become certified.

Pay:
The median annual wage for public relations and fundraising managers was $107,320 in May 2016. The median wage is the wage at which half the workers in an occupation earned more than that amount and half earned less. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $59,070, and the highest 10 percent earned more than $205,110.

For more info CLICK HERE.



Week of April 22-28, 2017

NURSE ANESTHETICS, MIDWIVES and PRACTITIONERS

What Nurse Anesthetics, Midwives and Practitioners Do:
Nurse anesthetists, nurse midwives, and nurse practitioners, also referred to as advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs), coordinate patient care and may provide primary and specialty healthcare. The scope of practice varies from state to state.

Work Environment:
Advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs) work in a variety of settings including physicians' offices, hospitals, schools, and clinics. Nurse midwives also work in birthing centers. Some APRNs may treat patients in their patients’ homes.

APRNs may also travel long distances to help care for patients in places where there are not enough healthcare workers.

How to Become an Nurse Anesthetists, Midwife or Practitioner:
Nurse anesthetists, nurse midwives, and nurse practitioners, also referred to as advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs), must earn at least a master’s degree in one of the specialty roles. APRNs must also be licensed registered nurses in their state and pass a national certification exam.  They must earn a master’s degree from an accredited program. These programs include both classroom education and clinical experience. Courses in anatomy, physiology, and pharmacology are common as well as coursework specific to the chosen APRN role.

Pay:
The median annual wage for nurse anesthetists, nurse midwives, and nurse practitioners was $107,460 in May 2016. The median wage is the wage at which half the workers in an occupation earned more than that amount and half earned less. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $74,300, and the highest 10 percent earned more than $175,170.

For more info CLICK HERE.



Week of April 3-7
TOP EXECUTIVES

What Top Executives Do:
Top executives devise strategies and policies to ensure that an organization meets its goals. They plan, direct, and coordinate operational activities of companies and organizations.

Work Environment:
Top executives work in nearly every industry. They work for large and small businesses, ranging from companies in which they are the only employee to firms with thousands of employees. Top executives often work many hours, including evenings and weekends. In 2014, about half worked more than 40 hours per week. Travel is common, particularly for chief executives.

How to Become a Top Executive:
Although education and training requirements vary widely by position and industry, many top executives have at least a bachelor’s degree and a considerable amount of work experience.

Pay:
The median annual wage for top executives was $102,690 in May 2015.

For more info CLICK HERE.


Week of March 13th-17th
SPEECH-LANGUAGE
PATHOLOGISTS

Speech-language pathologists (sometimes called speech therapists) assess, diagnose, treat, and help to prevent communication and swallowing disorders in patients. Speech, language, and swallowing disorders result from a variety of causes, such as a stroke, brain injury, hearing loss, developmental delay, Parkinson’s disease, a cleft palate, or autism.  They will evaluate a patients' level of speech/language and identify treatment options.  SLPs will teach patients how to make sounds and improve their voices.

In medical facilities, speech-language pathologists work with physicians and surgeons, social workers, psychologists, and other healthcare workers. In schools, they work with teachers, other school personnel, and parents to develop and carry out individual or group programs, provide counseling, and support classroom activities. For more information on teachers, see the profiles on preschool teachers, kindergarten and elementary school teachers, middle school teachers, high school teachers, and special education teachers.

Work Environment:
About 2 out of 5 speech-language pathologists worked in schools in 2014. Most others worked in healthcare facilities, such as hospitals.

Speech-language pathologists typically need at least a master’s degree. Although master’s programs do not require a particular undergraduate degree for admission, certain courses must be taken before entering a program. Required courses vary by institution.

Graduate programs often include courses in speech and language development, age-specific speech disorders, alternative communication methods, and swallowing disorders. These programs also include supervised clinical experience.

Pay:
The median annual wage for speech-language pathologists was $73,410 in May 2015. The median wage is the wage at which half the workers in an occupation earned more than that amount and half earned less. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $46,000, and the highest 10 percent earned more than $114,840.

For more info CLICK HERE.


Week of March 6-10th
MICROBIOLOGIST

Microbiologists study microorganisms such as bacteria, viruses, algae, fungi, and some types of parasites. They try to understand how these organisms live, grow, and interact with their environments. Microbiologists plan and conduct complex research projects, such as improving sterilization procedures or developing new drugs to combat infectious diseases.

They typically work in laboratories and offices, where they conduct experiments and analyze the results. Microbiologists who work with dangerous organisms must follow strict safety procedures to avoid contamination. Some microbiologists may conduct onsite visits or collect samples from lakes, streams, and oceans, and, as a result, may travel occasionally and spend some time outside. Most microbiologists work full time and keep regular hours.

How to Become a Microbiologist:
Microbiologists need at least a bachelor’s degree in microbiology or a closely related field such as biochemistry or cell biology. Many colleges and universities offer degree programs in biological sciences, including microbiology.  Most microbiology majors take core courses in microbial genetics and microbial physiology and elective classes such as environmental microbiology and virology. Students also must take classes in other sciences, such as biochemistry, chemistry, and physics, because it is important for microbiologists to have a broad understanding of the sciences.

The median annual wage for microbiologists was $67,550 in May 2015. The median wage is the wage at which half the workers in an occupation earned more than that amount and half earned less. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $38,810, and the highest 10 percent earned more than $125,200.

For more info CLICK HERE.



Week of February 20-24th
RESPIRATORY THERAPIST


Respiratory therapists care for patients who have trouble breathing—for example, from a chronic respiratory disease, such as asthma or emphysema. Their patients range from premature infants with undeveloped lungs to elderly patients who have diseased lungs. They also provide emergency care to patients suffering from heart attacks, drowning, or shock.

Respiratory therapists held about 120,700 jobs in 2014. Most respiratory therapists work in hospitals.

Respiratory therapists typically need an associate’s degree, but some have bachelor’s degrees. Respiratory therapists are licensed in all states except Alaska; requirements vary by state.

The median annual wage for respiratory therapists was $57,790 in May 2015.

For more info CLICK HERE.


Week of February 13-17

AUDIOLOGISTS


Audiologists diagnose, manage, and treat a patient’s hearing, balance, or ear problems.  Audiologists use audiometers, computers, and other devices to test patients’ hearing ability and balance. They work to determine the extent of hearing damage and identify the underlying cause. Audiologists measure the loudness at which a person begins to hear sounds and the person’s ability to distinguish between sounds and understand speech.

Most audiologists work in healthcare facilities, such as hospitals, physicians’ offices, and audiology clinics. Some work in schools or for school districts and travel between facilities. Others work in health and personal care stores.

Audiologists need a doctoral degree and must be licensed in all states. Requirements for licensure vary by state.

Pay:
The median annual wage for audiologists was $74,890 in May 2015.

Job Outlook:
Employment of audiologists is projected to grow 29 percent from 2014 to 2024, much faster than the average for all occupations. Hearing loss increases as people age, so the aging population is likely to increase demand for audiologists.

For more info CLICK HERE.




Week of February 6-10
COMPUTER PROGRAMMER 

Computer programmers

Computer programmers write and test code that allows computer applications and software programs to function properly. They turn the program designs created by software developers and engineers into instructions that a computer can follow.

Programmers usually work in offices, most commonly in the computer systems design and related services industry.

Most computer programmers have a bachelor’s degree; however, some employers hire workers with an associate’s degree. Most programmers specialize in a few programming languages.

The median annual wage for computer programmers was $79,530 in May 2015.

Job Outlook
Employment of computer programmers is projected to decline 8 percent from 2014 to 2024. Computer programming can be done from anywhere in the world, so companies sometimes hire programmers in countries where wages are lower.

For more info CLICK HERE.


Week of January 30-February 3
PHARMACIST

pharmacists image

Pharmacists dispense prescription medications to patients and offer expertise in the safe use of prescriptions. They also may conduct health and wellness screenings, provide immunizations, oversee the medications given to patients, and provide advice on healthy lifestyles.

Pharmacists work in pharmacies, including those in grocery and drug stores. They also work in hospitals and other healthcare facilities.

Pharmacists must have a Doctor of Pharmacy (Pharm.D.), a 4-year professional degree. They must also be licensed, which requires passing two exams.

The median annual wage for pharmacists was $121,500 in May 2015.

Job Outlook
Employment of pharmacists is projected to grow 3 percent from 2014 to 2024, slower than the average for all occupations. Increased demand for prescription medications will lead to more demand for pharmaceutical services. Employment of pharmacists in traditional pharmacies is projected to decline slightly.

For more info CLICK HERE.



Week of January 23-27

POLITICAL SCIENTIST

political scientists image
Political scientists study the origin, development, and operation of political systems. They research political ideas and analyze governments, policies, political trends, and related issues.

Political scientists typically work full time in an office. They sometimes work additional hours to finish reports and meet deadlines. More than half worked in the federal government in 2014.

Political scientists need a master’s degree or Ph.D. in political science, public administration, or a related field.

The median annual wage for political scientists was $99,730 in May 2015.

Job Outlook
Employment of political scientists is projected to decline 2 percent from 2014 to 2024. Political scientists should face strong competition for jobs as the number of candidates is expected to exceed the number of available positions.

For more info CLICK HERE.


Week of January 16-20

MARKET RESEARCH ANALYST

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Market research analysts study market conditions to examine potential sales of a product or service. They help companies understand what products people want, who will buy them, and at what price.

Because most industries use market research, these analysts are employed throughout the economy. Most analysts work full time during regular business hours. Some work under pressure of deadlines and tight schedules.

Most market research analysts need at least a bachelor’s degree. Top research positions may require a master’s degree. Strong math and analytical skills are essential.

The median annual wage for market research analysts was $62,150 in May 2015.

Job Outlook
Employment of market research analysts is projected to grow 19 percent from 2014 to 2024, much faster than the average for all occupations. Employment growth will be driven by an increased use of data and market research across all industries, to understand the needs and wants of customers and to measure the effectiveness of marketing and business strategies.

For more info CLICK HERE.



ARCHITECT

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Architects plan and design houses, factories, office buildings, and other structures.

Architects spend much of their time in offices, where they develop plans, meet with clients, and consult with engineers and other architects. They also visit construction sites to prepare initial drawings and review the progress of projects to ensure that clients’ objectives are met. About 1 in 5 were self-employed in 2014.

There are typically three main steps to becoming a licensed architect: completing a professional degree in architecture, gaining relevant experience through a paid internship, and passing the Architect Registration Examination.

The median annual wage for architects was $76,100 in May 2015.

Job Outlook
Employment of architects is projected to grow 7 percent from 2014 to 2024, about as fast as the average for all occupations. Competition for jobs will be very strong because the number of applicants continues to outnumber available positions.

For more info CLICK HERE.



SCHOOL COUNSELOR
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School counselors help students develop academic and social skills and succeed in school. Career counselors assist people with the process of making career decisions by helping them develop skills or choose a career or educational program.

School counselors work in public and private schools. Career counselors work in colleges, government agencies, career centers, and private practices. Both types of counselors generally work full time.

Most school counselors have a master’s degree in school counseling or a related field and have a state-issued credential. Some employers prefer that career counselors have a master’s degree. Career counselors who work in private practices may also need a license.

The median annual wage for school and career counselors was $53,660 in May 2015.

Job Outlook
Employment of school and career counselors is projected to grow 8 percent from 2014 to 2024, about as fast as the average for all occupations. Increasing school enrollments should lead to employment growth of school and career counselors.


For more info CLICK HERE.




FASHION DESIGNER

fashion designers image

Fashion designers create original clothing, accessories, and footwear. They sketch designs, select fabrics and patterns, and give instructions on how to make the products they designed.

Fashion designers work in wholesale or manufacturing establishments, apparel companies, retailers, theater or dance companies, and design firms. Most fashion designers work in New York and California.

Most fashion designers have a bachelor’s degree in a related field, such as fashion design or fashion merchandising. Employers usually seek applicants with creativity, as well as a good technical understanding of the production process for clothing, accessories, or footwear.

The median annual wage for fashion designers was $63,670 in May 2015.

Job Outlook
Employment of fashion designers is projected to grow 3 percent from 2014 to 2024, slower than the average for all occupations. Declining employment in the apparel manufacturing industry is slowing the overall employment growth of fashion designers.


For more info CLICK HERE.



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DENTISTS

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Dentists diagnose and treat problems with patients’ teeth, gums, and related parts of the mouth. They provide advice and instruction on taking care of the teeth and gums and on diet choices that affect oral health.

Dentists held about 151,500 jobs in 2014. Some dentists own their own businesses and work alone or with a small staff.

Dentists must be licensed in the state(s) in which they work. Licensure requirements vary by state, although candidates usually must graduate from an accredited dental school and pass written and practical exams.

The median annual wage for dentists was $158,310 in May 2015.

Employment of dentists is projected to grow 18 percent from 2014 to 2024, much faster than the average for all occupations. The demand for dental services will increase as the population ages, cosmetic dental services become increasingly popular, and access to health insurance continues to grow.

For more info CLICK HERE.


SOCIAL WORKER

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Social workers help people solve and cope with problems in their everyday lives. One group of social workers—clinical social workers—also diagnose and treat mental, behavioral, and emotional issues.

Social workers are employed in a variety of settings, including mental health clinics, schools, child welfare and human service agencies, hospitals, settlement houses, community development corporations, and private practices. They generally work full time and may need to work evenings, weekends, and holidays.

Although most social workers need a bachelor’s degree in social work, clinical social workers must have a master’s degree and 2 years of post-master’s experience in a supervised clinical setting. Clinical social workers must also be licensed in the state in which they practice.

 The median annual wage for social workers was $45,900 in May 2015.

Employment of social workers is projected to grow 12 percent from 2014 to 2024, faster than the average for all occupations. Employment growth will be driven by increased demand for healthcare and social services, but will vary by specialty.

For more info CLICK HERE.


MATERIALS ENGINEER

materials engineers image
Materials engineers develop, process, and test materials used to create a wide range of products, from computer chips and aircraft wings to golf clubs and biomedical devices. They study the properties and structures of metals, ceramics, plastics, composites, nanomaterials (extremely small substances), and other substances to create new materials that meet certain mechanical, electrical, and chemical requirements.

Materials engineers generally work in offices where they have access to computers and design equipment. Others work in factories or research and development laboratories. Materials engineers typically work full time and may work overtime hours when necessary.

Materials engineers must have a bachelor’s degree in materials science and engineering or in a related engineering field. Completing internships and cooperative engineering programs while in school can be helpful in getting hired as a materials engineer.

The median annual wage for materials engineers was $91,310 in May 2015. 

Employment of materials engineers is projected to show little or no change from 2014 to 2024. Materials engineers will be needed to design uses for new materials both in traditional industries, such as aerospace manufacturing, and in industries focused on new medical or scientific products. However, most materials engineers work in manufacturing industries, which are expected to experience employment declines.

For more info CLICK HERE.


REGISTERED NURSE
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What Registered Nurses Do
Registered nurses (RNs) provide and coordinate patient care, educate patients and the public about various health conditions and provide advice and emotional support to patients and their family members. 

Registered nurses work in hospitals, physicians' offices, home healthcare services, and nursing care facilities. Others work in correctional facilities or schools, or serve in the military.

Registered nurses usually take one of three education paths: a Bachelor of Science degree in nursing (BSN), an associate’s degree in nursing (ADN), or a diploma from an approved nursing program. Registered nurses also must be licensed.

The median annual wage for registered nurses was $67,490 in May 2015. 
Employment of registered nurses is projected to grow 16 percent from 2014 to 2024, much faster than the average for all occupations. Growth will occur for a number of reasons, including an increased emphasis on preventive care; growing rates of chronic conditions, such as diabetes and obesity; and demand for healthcare services from the baby-boom population, as they live longer and more active lives.

For more info CLICK HERE.




LAWYER
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Lawyers advise and represent individuals, businesses, and government agencies on legal issues and disputes.

The majority of lawyers work in private and corporate legal offices. Some work for federal, local, and state governments. The majority work full time, and many work more than 40 hours a week.
All lawyers must have a law degree and must also typically pass a state’s written bar examination.
The median annual wage for lawyers was $115,820 in May 2015.
Employment of lawyers is projected to grow 6 percent from 2014 to 2024, about as fast as the average for all occupations. Competition for jobs should continue to be strong because more students graduate from law school each year than there are jobs available.

For more info CLICK HERE.


Week of Oct. 31-Nov. 4
Economists study the production and distribution of resources, goods, and services by collecting and analyzing data, researching trends, and evaluating economic issues. 

Although the majority of economists work independently in an office, some collaborate with other economists and statisticians. Most economists work full time during regular business hours, but occasionally they work overtime to meet deadlines. 
Most economists need a master's degree or Ph.D. However, some entry- level jobs- primarily in the federal government- are available for workers with a bachelor's degree. 
The median annual wage for economists was $99,180 in May 2015. 
Employment of economists is projected to grow 6% from 2014-2024, about as fast as the average for all occupations. Job prospects should be best for those with a master's degree or Ph.D., strong analytical skills, and related work experiences. 

For more info CLICK HERE.


Week of Oct. 24-28th

INSURANCE UNDERWRITER

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What Insurance Underwriters Do 
Insurance underwriters decide whether to provide insurance and under what terms. They evaluate insurance applications and determine coverage amounts and premiums.

Work Environment
Insurance underwriters held about 103,400 jobs in 2014. The industries that employed the most insurance underwriters were as follows:

How to Become an Insurance Underwriter
Employers prefer to hire candidates who have a bachelor’s degree. However, insurance-related work experience and strong computer skills may be enough. Certification is generally necessary for advancement to senior underwriter and underwriter manager positions.

Pay
The median annual wage for insurance underwriters was $65,040 in May 2015

Job Outlook
Employment of insurance underwriters is projected to decline 11 percent from 2014 to 2024. Automated underwriting software allows workers to process applications more quickly than before, reducing the need for underwriters. As this technology improves, more underwriting decisions can be made automatically. However, there still will be a need for underwriters to evaluate automated recommendations, particularly in complex or specific fields, such as marine insurance.


For more info CLICK HERE.


Week of Oct. 16th-20th

SOCIOLOGIST 

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What Sociologists Do 
Sociologists study society and social behavior by examining the groups, cultures, organizations, social institutions, and processes that develop when people interact and work together. 

Work Environment
Most sociologists work in research organizations, colleges and universities, and state and local government. They typically work full time during regular business hours.

How to Become a Sociologist
Most sociology jobs require a master’s degree or Ph.D. Many bachelor’s degreeholders find positions in related fields, such as social services, education, or public policy.

Pay
The median annual wage for sociologists was $73,760 in May 2015.

Job Outlook
Employment of sociologists is projected to show little or no change from 2014 to 2024. Sociologists can expect to face very strong competition because sociology is a popular field of study with a relatively small number of positions.

For more info CLICK HERE.

Week of Oct. 10th-14th
HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGER

human resources managers image

Human resources managers plan, direct, and coordinate the administrative functions of an organization. They oversee the recruiting, interviewing, and hiring of new staff; consult with top executives on strategic planning; and serve as a link between an organization's management and its employees. 


Work Environment
Human resources are employed in nearly every industry. They work in offices, and most work full time during regular business hours. Some must travel to attend professional meetings or to recruit employees.  
work in offices, laboratories, and outdoors. Depending on their job and interests, they may spend considerable time in the field gathering data and studying animals in their natural habitats. Other zoologists and wildlife biologists may spend very little time in the field.

How to Become a Human Resources Manager
Candidates need a combination of education and several years of related work experience to become a human resources manager. Although a bachelor’s degree is sufficient for most positions, some jobs require a master’s degree. Candidates should have strong interpersonal skills.

The median annual wage for human resources managers was $104,440 in May 2015. 
Employment of human resources managers is projected to grow 9 percent from 2014 to 2024, faster than the average for all occupations. As new companies form and organizations expand their operations, they will need human resources managers to oversee and administer their programs, and to ensure firms adhere to changing and complex employment laws. Strong competition can be expected for most positions.

For more info CLICK HERE.

Week of Oct 3-7
WILDLIFE BIOLOGIST

What Wildlife Biologists Do
Zoologists and wildlife biologists study animals and other wildlife and how they interact with their ecosystems. They study the physical characteristics of animals, animal behaviors, and the impacts humans have on wildlife and natural habitats.

Work Environment
They work in offices, laboratories, and outdoors. Depending on their job and interests, they may spend considerable time in the field gathering data and studying animals in their natural habitats. Other zoologists and wildlife biologists may spend very little time in the field.

How to Become a Wildlife Biologist
Zoologists and wildlife biologists need a bachelor’s degree for entry-level positions; a master’s degree is often needed for higher level investigative or scientific work. A Ph.D. is necessary to lead independent research and for most university research positions.

Pay
The median annual wage for zoologists and wildlife biologists was $59,680 in May 2015.

Job Outlook
Employment of zoologists and wildlife biologists is projected to grow 4 percent from 2014 to 2024, slower than the average for all occupations. More zoologists and wildlife biologists will be needed to study the impact of human population growth on wildlife and their natural habitats. However, because most funding comes from governmental agencies, demand for zoologists and wildlife biologists will be limited by budgetary constraints.

For more info CLICK HERE.


Week of Sept 26-30
SOFTWARE DEVELOPERS

What Software Developers Do
Software developers are the creative minds behind computer programs. Some develop the applications that allow people to do specific tasks on a computer or another device. Others develop the underlying systems that run the devices or that control networks.

Work Environment
Many software developers work for firms that deal in computer systems design and related services or for software publishers.

How to Become a Software Developer
Software developers usually have a bachelor’s degree in computer science and strong computer programming skills.

Pay
The median annual wage for software developers was $100,690 in May 2015.

Job Outlook
Employment of software developers is projected to grow 17 percent from 2014 to 2024, much faster than the average for all occupations. The main reason for the rapid growth is a large increase in the demand for computer software.

For more information CLICK HERE.


Week of Sep 19-23
MATHEMATICIANS

Mathematicians conduct research to develop and understand mathematical principles. They also analyze data and apply mathematical techniques to help solve real-world problems.

Mathematicians work in the federal government and in private science and engineering research companies. They may work on teams with engineers, scientists, and other professionals.

Mathematicians typically need at least a master’s degree in mathematics. However, some positions are available for those with a bachelor’s degree.

The median annual wage for mathematicians was $111,110 in May 2015.

Employment of mathematicians is projected to grow 21 percent from 2014 to 2024, much faster than the average for all occupations. Businesses will need mathematicians to analyze the increasing volume of digital and electronic data.

For more info CLICK HERE


Week of Sep 12-16
ARCHIVISTS, CURATORS & MUSEUM WORKERS

What Archivists, Curators, and Museum Workers Do
Archivists appraise, process, catalog, and preserve permanent records and historically valuable documents. Curators oversee collections of artwork and historic items, and may conduct public service activities for an institution. Museum technicians and conservators prepare and restore objects and documents in museum collections and exhibits.

Work Environment
Archivists, curators, museum technicians, and conservators typically work in museums, historical sites, governments, colleges and universities, corporations, and other institutions that require their skills. Most work full time.

How to Become an Archivist, Curator, or Museum Worker
Most archivist, curator, and conservator positions require a master’s degree related to the position’s field. Museum technicians must have a bachelor’s degree. People often gain experience through an internship or by volunteering in archives and museums.

Pay
The median annual wage for archivists, curators, and museum workers was $46,710 in May 2015.

Job Outlook
Employment of archivists, curators, museum technicians, and conservators is projected to grow 7 percent from 2014 to 2024, about as fast as the average for all occupations. The need to store information in archives and public interest in science, art, and history, will continue to spur demand for archivists, curators, museum technicians, and conservators. Applicants should expect very strong competition for jobs.

For more info CLICK HERE

Week of Sep 5-9
PUBLIC RELATIONS SPECIALISTS


What Public Relations Specialists Do
Public relations specialists create and maintain a favorable public image for the organization they represent. They design media releases to shape public perception of their organization and to increase awareness of its work and goals.

Work Environment
Public relations specialists usually work in offices. Some attend community activities. Long workdays are common, as is overtime.

How to Become a Public Relations Specialist
Public relations specialists typically need a bachelor’s degree in public relations, journalism, communications, English, or business.

Pay
The median annual wage for public relations specialists was $56,770 in May 2015.

Job Outlook
Employment of public relations specialists is projected to grow 6 percent from 2014 to 2024, about as fast as the average for all occupations. The need for organizations to maintain their public image will continue to drive employment growth. Candidates can expect strong competition for jobs at advertising and public relations firms and organizations with large media exposure.

For more info CLICK HERE

Week of June 6 - 10
ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERS

What Environmental Engineers Do:
Environmental engineers use the principles of engineering, soil science, biology, and chemistry to develop solutions to environmental problems. They are involved in efforts to improve recycling, waste disposal, public health, and water and air pollution control.
Environmental engineers work in a variety of settings because of the nature of the tasks they do. When they are working with other engineers and urban and regional planners, environmental engineers are likely to be in offices. When they are carrying out solutions through construction projects, they are likely to be at construction sites.

How to Become an Environmental Engineer:
Environmental engineers must have a bachelor’s degree in environmental engineering or a related field, such as civil, chemical, or general engineering. Employers also value practical experience. Therefore, cooperative engineering programs, which provide college credit for structured job experience, are valuable as well.

Pay:
The median annual wage for environmental engineers was $84,560 in May 2015.

Job Outlook:
Employment of environmental engineers is projected to grow 12 percent from 2014 to 2024, faster than the average for all occupations. State and local government concerns regarding water availability, and quality, should lead to efforts to increase the efficiency of water use.

For more info CLICK HERE

Week of May 23 - 27

CHIROPRACTORS

What Chiropractors Do
Chiropractors treat patients with health problems of the neuromusculoskeletal system, which includes nerves, bones, muscles, ligaments, and tendons. They use spinal adjustments and manipulation, and other techniques to manage patients’ health concerns, such as back and neck pain.

Work Environment
Most chiropractors work in a solo or group chiropractic practice. A large number are self-employed.

How to Become a Chiropractor
Chiropractors must earn a Doctor of Chiropractic (D.C.) degree and get a state license. Doctor of Chiropractic programs typically take 4 years to complete and require at least 3 years of undergraduate college education for admission.

Pay
The median annual wage for chiropractors was $64,440 in May 2015.

Job Outlook
Employment of chiropractors is projected to grow 17 percent from 2014 to 2024, much faster than the average for all occupations. People across all age groups are increasingly becoming interested in alternative or complementary healthcare. Chiropractic care is appealing to patients because chiropractors use nonsurgical methods of treatment and do not prescribe drugs.

For more information CLICK HERE


Week of May 16 - 20

CARTOGRAPHERS AND PHOTOGRAMMETRISTS


What Cartographers and Photogrammetrists Do
Cartographers and photogrammetrists collect, measure, and interpret geographic information in order to create and update maps and charts for regional planning, education, emergency response, and other purposes.

Work Environment
Although cartographers and photogrammetrists spend much of their time in offices, certain jobs require extensive travel to locations that are being mapped.

How to Become a Cartographer or Photogrammetrist
A bachelor’s degree in cartography, geography, geomatics (the discipline that combines the science, engineering, math, and art of collecting and managing geographically referenced information), or surveying is the most common path of entry into this occupation. Cartographers and photogrammetrists must be licensed in some states.

Pay
The median annual wage for cartographers and photogrammetrists was $61,880 in May 2015.

Job Outlook
Employment of cartographers and photogrammetrists is projected to grow 29 percent from 2014 to 2024, much faster than the average for all occupations. The increasing use of maps for government planning should fuel employment growth. For this reason, job prospects are likely to be excellent.

For more information CLICK HERE



Week of May 9 - 13

OCCUPATIONAL THERAPISTS
What Occupational Therapists Do
Occupational therapists treat injured, ill, or disabled patients through the therapeutic use of everyday activities. They help these patients develop, recover, and improve the skills needed for daily living and working.

Work Environment
About half of occupational therapists work in offices of occupational therapy or in hospitals. Others work in schools, nursing homes, and
home health services. Therapists spend a lot of time on their feet while working with patients.

How to Become an Occupational Therapist
Occupational therapists typically have a master’s degree in occupational therapy. All states require occupational therapists to be licensed.

Pay
The median annual wage for occupational therapists was $80,150 in May 2015.

Job Outlook
Employment of occupational therapists is projected to grow 27 percent from 2014 to 2024, much faster than the average for all occupations. Occupational therapy will continue to be an important part of treatment for people with various illnesses and disabilities, such as Alzheimer’s disease, cerebral palsy, autism, or the loss of a limb.

For more information CLICK HERE

Week of May 2 - 6
HYDROLOGISTS

What Hydrologists Do
Hydrologists study how water moves across and through the Earth’s crust. They use their expertise to solve problems in the areas of water quality or availability.

Work Environment
Hydrologists work in offices and in the field. In offices, hydrologists spend much of their time using computers to analyze data and model their findings. In the field, hydrologists may have to wade into lakes and streams to collect samples or to read and inspect monitoring equipment.

How to Become a Hydrologist
Hydrologists need at least a bachelor’s degree for entry-level positions; however, some workers begin their careers with a master’s degree. 

Pay
The median annual wage for hydrologists was $79,550 in May 2015.

Job Outlook
Employment of hydrologists is projected to grow 7 percent from 2014 to 2024, about as fast as the average for all occupations. Population growth and environmental concerns are expected to increase demand for hydrologists.

For more information CLICK HERE

Week of April 11 - 15

                                                                                                    PERSONAL FINANCIAL ADVISORS

What Personal Financial Advisors Do
Personal financial advisors provide advice on investments, insurance, mortgages, college savings, estate planning, taxes, and retirement to help individuals manage their finances.  

Work Environment
Most personal financial advisors work in the finance and insurance industry or are self-employed. They typically work full time and may meet
with clients in the evenings or on weekends.

How to Become a Personal Financial Advisor
Personal financial advisors typically need a bachelor’s degree. A master’s degree and certification can improve one’s chances for advancement in the occupation.

Pay
The median annual wage for personal financial advisors was $81,060 in May 2014.

Job Outlook
Employment of personal financial advisors is projected to grow 30 percent from 2014 to 2024, much faster than the average for all occupations. As the population ages and life expectancies rise, demand for financial planning services should increase.

Week of April 4 - 8 

MIDDLE SCHOOL TEACHERS

What Middle School Teachers Do
Middle school teachers educate students, typically in sixth through eighth grades. Middle school teachers help students build on the fundamentals they learned in elementary school and prepare them for the more difficult curriculum they will face in high school.

Work Environment
Middle school teachers work in public and private schools. They generally work school hours when students are present, and use nights and weekends to prepare lessons and grade papers. Most do not work during the summer.

How to Become a Middle School Teacher
Middle school teachers must have at least a bachelor’s degree. In addition, public school teachers must have a state-issued certification or license.

Pay
The median annual wage for middle school teachers was $54,940 in May 2014.

Job Outlook
Employment of middle school teachers is projected to grow 6 percent from 2014 to 2024, about as fast as the average for all occupations. Growth is projected because of expected increases in enrollment. However, employment growth will vary by region.

For More Information CLICK HERE

Week of March 28 - April 1

POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION ADMINISTRATORS

What Postsecondary Education Administrators Do
Postsecondary education administrators oversee student services, academics, and faculty research at colleges and universities. Their job duties vary depending on the area of the college they manage, such as admissions, student life, or the office of the registrar.

Work Environment
Postsecondary education administrators work in colleges, universities, community colleges, and technical and trade schools. Most work full time.

How to Become a Postsecondary Education Administrator
Although a bachelor’s degree may be acceptable for some entry-level positions, a master’s degree or Ph.D. is often required. Employers typically prefer to hire candidates who have experience working in the field, especially for occupations such as registrars and academic deans.

Pay
The median annual wage for postsecondary education administrators was $88,390 in May 2014.

Job Outlook
Employment of postsecondary education administrators is projected to grow 9 percent from 2014 to 2024, faster than the average for all occupations. Expected growth is due to increases in enrollments.

For More Information CLICK HERE.

Week of March 21 - 25 

PUBLIC RELATIONS SPECIALIST

What Public Relations Specialists Do
Public relations specialists create and maintain a favorable public image for the organization they represent. They design media releases to shape public perception of their organization and to increase awareness of its work and goals.

Work Environment
Public relations specialists usually work in offices. Some attend community activities. Long workdays are common, as is overtime.

How to Become a Public Relations Specialist
Public relations specialists typically need a bachelor’s degree in public relations, journalism, communications, English, or business.

Pay
The median annual wage for public relations specialists was $55,680 in May 2014.

Job Outlook
Employment of public relations specialists is projected to grow 6 percent from 2014 to 2024, about as fast as the average for all occupations. The need for organizations to maintain their public image will continue to drive employment growth. Candidates can expect strong competition for jobs at advertising and public relations firms and organizations with large media exposure.

For more information CLICK HERE.


Week of March 14 - 18 

PRODUCERS AND DIRECTORS



What Producers and Directors Do
Producers and directors create motion pictures, television shows, live theater, commercials, and other performing arts productions. They interpret a writer’s script to entertain or inform an audience.

Work Environment
Producers and directors work under a lot of pressure, and many are under stress to finish their work on time.

How to Become a Producer or Director
Most producers and directors have a bachelor’s degree and several years of experience in motion picture, TV, or theater production, working as an actor, film and video editor, cinematographer, or another related occupation.

Pay
The median annual wage for producers and directors was $69,100 in May 2014.

Job Outlook
Employment of producers and directors is projected to grow 9 percent from 2014 to 2024, faster than the average for all occupations. Job growth in the motion picture and video industry is expected to stem from strong demand from the public for more movies and television shows, as well as an increased demand from foreign audiences for U.S.-produced films.

For more information CLICK HERE


Week of March 7 - 11 

                                                                                                NUCLEAR ENGINEERS

What Nuclear Engineers Do
Nuclear engineers research and develop the processes, instruments, and systems used to derive benefits from nuclear energy and radiation. Many of these engineers find industrial and medical uses for radioactive materials—for example, in equipment used in medical diagnosis and treatment.

Work Environment
Nuclear engineers typically work in offices; however, their work setting varies with the industry in which they are employed.
Most nuclear engineers work full time.

How to Become a Nuclear Engineer
Nuclear engineers must have a bachelor’s degree in nuclear engineering. Employers also value experience, and this can be gained through cooperative-education engineering programs.

Pay
The median annual wage for nuclear engineers was $100,470 in May 2014.

Job Outlook
Employment of nuclear engineers is projected to decline 4 percent from 2014 to 2024. Employment in several of the industries that employ nuclear engineers is projected to decline, including electric power distribution, research and development in engineering, and the federal government.


Week of February 29 - March 4 

INTERPRETERS AND TRANSLATORS

What Interpreters and Translators Do
Interpreters and translators convert information from one language into another language. Interpreters work in spoken or sign language; translators work in written language.

Work Environment
Interpreters work in schools, hospitals, courtrooms, and conference centers. Some work for translation companies or individual organizations, and many translators also work from home. Self-employed interpreters and translators frequently have variable work schedules. Most interpreters and translators work full time during regular business hours.

How to Become an Interpreter or Translator
Although interpreters and translators typically need at least a bachelor’s degree, the most important requirement is to have native-level proficiency in English and at least one other language. Many complete job-specific training programs.

Pay
The median annual wage for interpreters and translators was $43,590 in May 2014.


Job Outlook
Employment of interpreters and translators is projected to grow 29 percent from 2014 to 2024, much faster than the average for all occupations. Employment growth will be driven by increasing globalization and by large increases in the number of non-English-speaking people in the United States. Job prospects should be best for those who have professional certification.

For more information CLICK HERE


Week of February 22-26

INTERIOR DESIGNERS

What Interior Designers Do
Interior designers make interior spaces functional, safe, and beautiful by determining space requirements and selecting decorative items, such as colors, lighting, and materials. They read blueprints and must be aware of building codes and inspection regulations, as well as universal accessibility standards.

Work Environment
Many interior designers work for the specialized design services industry or for the architectural, engineering, and related services industry. In 2014, about 1 in 4 were self-employed.

How to Become an Interior Designer
Interior designers usually need a bachelor’s degree with a focus on interior design.

Pay
The median annual wage for interior designers was $48,400 in May 2014.

Job Outlook
Employment of interior designers is projected to grow 4 percent from 2014 to 2024, slower than the average for all occupations. Designers will be needed to respond to consumer expectations that the interiors of homes and offices meet certain conditions, such as being environmentally friendly and more easily accessible.

For more information CLICK HERE.


Week of February 15-19

FILM AND VIDEO EDITORS AND CAMERA OPERATORS


What Film and Video Editors and Camera Operators Do
Film and video editors and camera operators manipulate moving images that entertain or inform an audience.

Work Environment
Film and video editors and camera operators typically work in studios or in office settings. Camera operators and videographers often shoot raw footage on location.

How to Become a Film and Video Editor or Camera Operator
Film and video editors and camera operators typically need a bachelor’s degree in a field related to film or broadcasting.

Pay
The median annual wage for film and video editors and camera operators was $52,470 in May 2014.

Job Outlook
Employment of film and video editors and camera operators is projected to grow 11 percent from 2014 to 2024, faster than the average for all occupations. Production companies and video freelancers are working with new content delivery methods, such as mobile devices or through online TV, which may lead to more work for editors and camera operators.


Week of February 8 - 12

POSTSECONDARY TEACHERS

What Postsecondary Teachers Do
Postsecondary teachers instruct students in a wide variety of academic and career and technical subjects beyond the high school level. They also conduct research and publish scholarly papers and books.

Work Environment
Postsecondary teachers work in public and private colleges and universities, professional schools, junior or community colleges, and career and technical schools. Outside of class time, their schedules are generally flexible, and they may spend that time in administrative, student advising, and research activities.

How to Become a Postsecondary Teacher
Educational requirements vary by subject and the type of educational institution. Most commonly, postsecondary teachers must have a Ph.D. However, a master's degree may be enough for some postsecondary teachers at community colleges. In career and technical schools, work experience may be important for getting a postsecondary teaching job.

Pay
The median annual wage for postsecondary teachers was $70,790 in May 2014.

Job Outlook
Employment of postsecondary teachers is projected to grow 13 percent from 2014 to 2024, faster than the average for all occupations. Growth is expected as enrollments at postsecondary institutions continue to rise, although it will be at a slower rate than it has been in the past. Many jobs are expected to be for part time faculty.

For more information CLICK HERE.



Week of February 1-5

                                                                                    EXERCISE PHYSIOLOGISTS

What Exercise Physiologists Do
Exercise physiologists develop fitness and exercise programs that help patients recover from chronic diseases and improve cardiovascular function, body composition, and flexibility.

Work Environment
About half of exercise physiologists were self-employed in 2014. Most others worked for hospitals, offices of physicians, and other healthcare providers.

How to Become an Exercise Physiologist
Exercise physiologists typically need at least a bachelor’s degree. Degree programs include science and health-related courses, such as biology, anatomy, kinesiology, and nutrition, as well as clinical work.

Pay
The median annual wage for exercise physiologists was $46,270 in May 2014.

Job Outlook
Employment of exercise physiologists is projected to grow 11 percent from 2014 to 2024, faster than the average for all occupations. Demand may rise as hospitals emphasize exercise and preventive care as part of their treatment and long-term rehabilitation from chronic diseases, such as cardiovascular and pulmonary diseases.

For more information CLICK HERE.


Week of January 25-29

GEOGRAPHERS

What Geographers Do
Geographers study the Earth and its land, features, and inhabitants. They also examine phenomena such as political or cultural structures and study the physical and human geographic characteristics of regions ranging in scale from local to global.

Work Environment
More than half of all geographers are employed by the federal government. Most work full time during standard business hours. Many geographers do fieldwork, which may include travel to foreign countries or remote locations.

How to Become a Geographer
Geographers need a bachelor’s degree for most entry-level positions and for positions within the federal government. Work experience and a master’s degree are typically required for more advanced positions.

Pay
The median annual wage for geographers was $76,420 in May 2014.

Job Outlook
Employment of geographers is projected to decline 2 percent from 2014 to 2024. Geographers should face strong competition for jobs as the number of candidates is expected to exceed the number of available positions.




Week of January 18 -22 
AUDIOLOGISTS

What Audiologists Do
Audiologists diagnose, manage, and treat a patient’s hearing, balance, or ear problems.

Work Environment
Most audiologists work in healthcare facilities, such as hospitals, physicians’ offices, and audiology clinics. Some work in schools or for school districts and travel between facilities. Others work in health and personal care stores.

How to Become an Audiologist
Audiologists need a doctoral degree and must be licensed in all states. Requirements for licensure vary by state.

Pay
The median annual wage for audiologists was $73,060 in May 2014.

Job Outlook
Employment of audiologists is projected to grow 29 percent from 2014 to 2024, much faster than the average for all occupations. Hearing loss increases as people age, so the aging population is likely to increase demand for audiologists.


Week of January 11 - 15 
                                                                                                  BUDGET ANALYSTS

What Budget Analysts Do
Budget analysts help public and private institutions organize their finances. They prepare budget reports and monitor institutional spending.

Work Environment
Budget analysts work in a variety of settings, including government agencies, universities, and companies. Most work full time.

How to Become a Budget Analyst
Budget analysts typically must have a bachelor’s degree, although some employers prefer candidates with a master’s degree.

Pay
The median annual wage for budget analysts was $71,220 in May 2014.

Job Outlook
Employment of budget analysts is projected to grow 3 percent from 2014 to 2024, slower than the average for all occupations. Budget analysts should be needed for their ability to manage the allocation of funds in both governments and businesses.



Week of January 4 - 8

                                                                              AGRICULTURAL AND FOOD SCIENTISTS 

What Agricultural and Food Scientists Do
Agricultural and food scientists research ways to improve the efficiency and safety of agricultural establishments and products.

Work Environment
Agricultural and food scientists work in various industries, including colleges and universities, manufacturing, and in scientific research and development. They work in offices, laboratories, and, sometimes, food production facilities. Most agricultural and food scientists work full time.

How to Become an Agricultural or Food Scientist
Agricultural and food scientists need at least a bachelor’s degree from an accredited postsecondary institution, although many get advanced degrees.

Pay
The median annual wage for agricultural and food scientists was $60,690 in May 2014.

Job Outlook
Employment of agricultural and food scientists is projected to grow 5 percent from 2014 to 2024, about as fast as the average for all occupations. Employment of agricultural and food scientists is projected to grow as research into agricultural production methods and techniques continues.



Week of December 14 -18 

SPECIAL EDUCATION TEACHERS
What Special Education Teachers Do
Special education teachers work with students who have a wide range of learning, mental, emotional, and physical disabilities. They adapt general education lessons and teach various subjects, such as reading, writing, and math, to students with mild and moderate disabilities. They also teach basic skills, such as literacy and communication techniques, to students with severe disabilities.

Work Environment
Most special education teachers work in public schools, teaching students at the preschool, elementary, middle, and high school level. Others work in private schools, childcare services, and other institutions. Many work the traditional 10-month school year, but some work year round.

How to Become a Special Education Teacher
Special education teachers in public schools are required to have a bachelor’s degree and a state-issued certification or license. Teachers in private schools also need a bachelor’s degree, but may not be required to have a state license or certification.

Pay
The median annual wage for special education teachers was $55,060 in May 2012.

Job Outlook
Employment of special education teachers is projected to grow 6 percent from 2012 to 2022, slower than the average for all occupations. Employment growth will be driven by continued demand for special education services. Many job opportunities will stem from the need to replace teachers who leave the occupation.




Week of December 7 - 11
ARCHITECTS

What Architects Do
Architects plan and design houses, office buildings, and other structures.

Work Environment
Architects spend much of their time in offices, where they meet with clients, and consult with engineers and other architects. They also visit construction sites to review the progress of projects. About 1 in 5 were self-employed in 2012.

How to Become an Architect
There are typically three main steps to becoming a licensed architect: completing a professional degree in architecture, gaining relevant experience through a paid internship, and passing the Architect Registration Exam.

Pay
The median annual wage for architects was $73,090 in May 2012.

Job Outlook
Employment of architects is projected to grow 17 percent from 2012 to 2022, faster than the average for all occupations. Competition for jobs will be strong as the number of applicants continues to outnumber available positions.



Week of November 30 - December 4

ELECTRICAL AND ELECTRONICS ENGINEERS 

What Electrical and Electronics Engineers Do
Electrical engineers design, develop, test, and supervise the manufacturing of electrical equipment, such as electric motors, radar and navigation systems, communications systems, and power generation equipment. Electronics engineers design and develop electronic equipment, such as broadcast and communications systems—from portable music players to global positioning systems (GPS).

Work Environment
Electrical and electronics engineers work primarily in research and development industries, engineering services firms,
manufacturing, and the federal government. Electrical and electronics engineers generally work indoors in offices. However, they may have to visit sites to observe a problem or a piece of complex equipment.

How to Become an Electrical or Electronics Engineer
Electrical and electronics engineers must have a bachelor’s degree. Employers also value practical experience, so participation in cooperative engineering programs, in which students earn academic credit for structured work experience, is valuable as well.

Pay
The median annual wage for electrical engineers was $87,920 in May 2012. The median annual wage for electronics engineers was $91,820 in May 2012.

Job Outlook
Employment of electrical and electronics engineers is projected to grow 4 percent from 2012 to 2022, slower than the average for all occupations. Job growth is expected because of electrical and electronics engineers’ versatility in developing and applying emerging technologies.



Week of November 23 - 27

RECREATIONAL THERAPISTS

What Recreational Therapists Do
Recreational therapists plan, direct, and coordinate recreation-based treatment programs for people with disabilities, injuries, or illnesses. Recreational therapists use a variety of modalities, including arts and crafts, drama, music, dance, sports, games, and community reintegration field trips to help maintain or improve a patient’s physical, social, and emotional well-being.


Work Environment
Recreational therapists work in a variety of settings. Most therapists work full time.

How to Become a Recreational Therapist
Recreational therapists typically need a bachelor’s degree. Many employers require therapists to be certified.

Pay
The median annual wage for recreational therapists was $42,280 in May 2012.

Job Outlook
Employment of recreational therapists is projected to grow 13 percent from 2012 to 2022, about as fast as the average for all occupations. As the large baby-boom generation ages, they will need recreational therapists to help treat age-related injuries and illnesses, such as strokes. Recreational therapists will also be needed to help patients manage chronic conditions such as diabetes and obesity.


Week of November 16-20 

COMPUTER AND INFORMATION RESEARCH SCIENTISTS

What Computer and Information Research Scientists Do
Computer and information research scientists invent and design new approaches to computing technology and find innovative uses for existing technology. They study and solve complex problems in computing for business, medicine, science, and other fields.

Work Environment
Most computer and information research scientists work full time. Those working on independent research may have flexible work schedules.

How to Become a Computer and Information Research Scientist
Most jobs for computer and information research scientists require a Ph.D. in computer science or a related field. In the federal government, a bachelor’s degree may be sufficient for some jobs.

Pay
The median annual wage for computer and information research scientists was $102,190 in May 2012.

Job Outlook
Employment of computer and information research scientists is projected to grow 15 percent from 2012 to 2022, faster than the average for all occupations. Computer scientists are likely to enjoy excellent job prospects, because many companies report difficulties finding these highly skilled workers.




Week of November 9-13 

GENETIC COUNSELOR

What Genetic Counselors Do
Genetic counselors assess individual or family risk for a variety of inherited conditions, such as genetic disorders and birth defects. They provide information and advice to other healthcare providers, or to individuals and families concerned with the risk of inherited conditions.

Work Environment
Genetic counselors work in university medical centers, private and public hospitals, physicians’ offices, and diagnostic laboratories. They work with families, patients, and other medical professionals. Most genetic counselors work full time.

How to Become a Genetic Counselor
Genetic counselors typically need at least a master’s degree in genetic counseling or genetics. Although most genetic counselors have a master’s degree, some earn a Ph.D.

Pay
The median annual wage for genetic counselors was $56,800 in May 2012.

Job Outlook
Employment of genetic counselors is projected to grow 41 percent from 2012 to 2022, much faster than the average for all occupations. Genetic counselors should have better than average job prospects overall.




Week of November 2-6 

                                                                                                 FINANCIAL ANALYSTS 
What Financial Analysts Do
Financial analysts provide guidance to businesses and individuals making investment decisions. They assess the performance of stocks, bonds, and other types of investments.

Work Environment
Financial analysts work in offices. Most work full time, and many work more than 40 hours per week.

How to Become a Financial Analyst
Financial analysts typically must have a bachelor’s degree, but a master’s degree is often required for advanced positions.

Pay
The median annual wage for financial analysts was $76,950 in May 2012.

Job Outlook
Employment of financial analysts is projected to grow 16 percent from 2012 to 2022, faster than the average for all occupations. A growing range of financial products and the need for in-depth knowledge of geographic regions are expected to lead to strong employment growth.




Week of October 26-30 

                                                                                                   OPTOMETRISTS

What Optometrists Do
Optometrists examine the eyes and other parts of the visual system. They also diagnose, and treat visual problems, and manage diseases, injuries, and other disorders of the eyes. They prescribe eyeglasses or contact lenses as needed.

Work Environment
Most optometrists work in stand-alone offices of optometry. A small number of optometrists work in doctors’ offices, retail stores, outpatient clinics, and hospitals. Most work full time, and some work evenings and weekends to accommodate patients’ needs.

How to Become an Optometrist
Optometrists must complete a Doctor of Optometry (O.D.) degree program and obtain a license to practice in a particular state. Doctor of Optometry programs take 4 years to complete, and most students have a bachelor’s degree before entering an O.D. program.

Pay
The median annual wage for optometrists was $97,820 in May 2012.

Job Outlook
Employment of optometrists is projected to grow 24 percent from 2012 to 2022, much faster than the average for all occupations. Because vision problems tend to occur more frequently later in life, an aging population will require more optometrists.




Week of October 19-24


                                                                                                                            PHYSICIAN ASSISTANT

What Physician Assistants Do
Physician assistants, also known as PAs, practice medicine on a team under the supervision of physicians and surgeons. They are formally educated to examine patients, diagnose injuries and illnesses, and provide treatment.

Work Environment
Physician assistants work in physicians’ offices, hospitals, and other healthcare settings. Most work full time.

How to Become a Physician Assistant
Physician assistants must complete an accredited EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM. These programs usually lead to a master’s degree. All states require physician assistants to be licensed.

Pay
The median annual wage for PHYSICIAN assistants was $90,930 in May 2012.

Job Outlook
Employment of physician assistants is projected to grow 38 percent from 2012 to 2022, much faster than the average for all occupations. Increased demand for healthcare services from the growing and aging population and widespread chronic disease, combined with a shortage of physicians, will result in increased demand for healthcare providers, such as physician assistants.




Week of October 12 - 16

STATISTICIAN

What Statisticians Do
Statisticians use statistical methods to collect and analyze data and help solve real-world problems in business, engineering, the sciences, or other fields.

Work Environment

Although statisticians work mostly in offices, they may travel to oversee a survey’s design or implementation or to collect data. About a quarter of statisticians work for government; many others work for private businesses.

How to Become a Statistician
Statisticians typically need a graduate degree in statistics or mathematics. However, there are an increasing number of positions available for those with only a bachelor’s degree.

Pay
The median annual wage for statisticians was $75,560 in May 2012.

Job Outlook
Employment of statisticians is projected to grow 27 percent from 2012 to 2022, much faster than the average for all occupations. Growth is expected to result from more widespread use of statistical analysis to make informed business, healthcare, and policy decisions.




Week of October 5 - 9

                                                                                                    LANDSCAPE ARCHITECT 

What Landscape Architects Do
Landscape architects plan and design land areas for parks, recreational facilities, private homes, campuses, and other open spaces.

Work Environment
Landscape architects spend much of their time in offices, creating plans and designs, preparing models and cost estimates, doing research, and attending meetings with clients and workers involved in designing or planning a project. They spend the rest of their worktime at jobsites.

How to Become a Landscape Architect
Most states require landscape architects to be licensed. Licensing requirements vary by state, but usually include a degree in landscape architecture from an accredited school, internship experience, and passing the Landscape Architect Registration Exam.

Pay
The median annual wage for landscape architects was $64,180 in May 2012.

Job Outlook
Employment of landscape architects is projected to grow 14 percent from 2012 to 2022, about as fast as the average for all occupations. Planning and development of new commercial, industrial, and residential construction projects and redevelopment of existing landscapes will drive employment growth.



Week of September 27 - October 2 

                                                                                                   FASHION DESIGNERS 

What Fashion Designers Do
Fashion designers create original clothing, accessories, and footwear. They sketch designs, select fabrics and patterns, and give instructions on how to make the products they designed.

Work Environment
Fashion designers work in wholesale or manufacturing establishments, apparel companies, retailers, theater or dance companies, and design
firms. Most fashion designers work in New York and California.

How to Become a Fashion Designer
Most fashion designers have a bachelor’s degree in a related field, such as fashion design or fashion merchandising. Employers usually seek applicants with creativity, as well as a good technical understanding of the production process for clothing, accessories, or footwear.

Pay
The median annual wage for fashion designers was $62,860 in May 2012.

Job Outlook
Employment of fashion designers is projected to decline 3 percent from 2012 to 2022. Declining employment in the apparel manufacturing industry is preventing overall employment of fashion designers from increasing.



Week of September 21 - September 25

                                                                                                        PARALEGAL

What Paralegals and Legal Assistants Do
Paralegals and legal assistants do a variety of tasks to support lawyers, including maintaining and organizing files, conducting legal research, and drafting documents.

Work Environment
Paralegals and legal assistants are found in all types of organizations, but most work for law firms, corporate legal departments, and government agencies. They usually work full
time, and overtime is sometimes needed to meet deadlines.

How to Become a Paralegal or Legal Assistant
Most paralegals and legal assistants have an associate’s degree or a certificate in paralegal studies. In some cases, employers may hire college graduates with a bachelor’s degree with no legal experience or specialized education and train them on the job.

Pay
The median annual wage for paralegals and legal assistants was $46,990 in May 2012.

Job Outlook
Employment of paralegals and legal assistants is projected to grow 17 percent from 2012 to 2022, faster than the average for all occupations. This occupation attracts many applicants, and competition for jobs will be strong. Experienced, formally trained paralegals with strong computer and database management skills should have the best job prospects.




Week of September 14-September 18 

                                                                                                            EDITORS

What Editors Do
Editors plan, review, and revise content for publication.

Work Environment
Although most editors work in offices, a growing number work remotely from home. The work can be stressful because editors often have tight deadlines. More than half worked in the publishing industry in 2012.

How to Become an Editor
Proficiency with computers and a bachelor’s degree in communications, journalism, or English is typically required to be an editor.

Pay
The median annual wage for editors was $53,880 in May 2012.

Job Outlook
Employment of editors is projected to show little or no change from 2012 to 2022, as print media continue to face strong pressure from online publications. Competition for jobs with established newspapers and magazines will be particularly strong.



Week of April 20-April 25

                                                                                                                  NURSES


What Registered Nurses Do
Registered nurses (RNs) provide and coordinate patient care, educate patients and the public about various health conditions, and provide advice and emotional support to patients and their family members.

Work Environment
Registered nurses work in hospitals, physicians' offices, home healthcare services, and nursing care facilities. Others work in correctional facilities, schools, or serve in the military.

How to Become a Registered Nurse
Registered nurses usually take one of three education paths: a bachelor's degree in nursing, an associate’s degree in nursing, or a diploma from an approved nursing program. Registered nurses must also be licensed.

Pay
The median annual wage for registered nurses was $65,470 in May 2012.

Job Outlook
Employment of registered nurses is projected to grow 19 percent from 2012 to 2022, faster than the average for all occupations. Growth will occur for a number of reasons, including an increased emphasis on preventative care; growing rates of chronic conditions, such as diabetes and obesity; and demand for healthcare services from the baby boomer population, as they live longer and more active lives.

For More Information Click Here


Week of March 30-April 3
                                                                                                           EPIDEMIOLOGISTS

What Epidemiologists Do
Epidemiologists are public health professionals who investigate patterns and causes of disease and injury in humans. They seek to reduce the risk and occurrence of negative health outcomes through research, community education, and health policy.

Work Environment
Epidemiologists work in offices and laboratories, usually at health departments for state and local governments, in hospitals, and at colleges and universities. Some do fieldwork to conduct interviews and collect samples for analyses. Fieldwork may bring epidemiologists into contact with infectious disease, but they very rarely get sick or suffer contagion.

How to Become an Epidemiologist
Epidemiologists need at least a master’s degree from an accredited postsecondary institution. Most epidemiologists have a master’s in public health (MPH) or a related field, and some have a doctoral training in epidemiology.

Pay
The median annual wage for epidemiologists was $65,270 in May 2012.

Job Outlook
Employment of epidemiologists is projected to grow 10 percent from 2012 to 2022, about as fast as the average for all occupations. Epidemiologists are likely to have good job prospects overall.



Week of March 23-27
                        AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERS

What Agricultural Engineers Do
Agricultural engineers—also known as biological and agricultural engineers—work on a variety of activities. These activities range from aquaculture (raising food, such as fish, that thrive in water) to land farming to forestry; from developing biofuels to improving conservation; from planning animal environments to finding better ways to process food.

Work Environment
Agricultural engineers work much of the time in offices. They also spend time at a variety of worksites, both indoors and outdoors, traveling to agricultural settings to see that equipment and machinery are functioning according to both the manufacturers’ instructions and federal and state regulations.

How to Become an Agricultural Engineer
Agricultural engineers must have a bachelor’s degree, preferably in agricultural engineering or biological engineering. Employers also value practical experience, so cooperative-education engineering programs at universities are valuable as well.

Pay
The median annual wage for agricultural engineers was $74,000 in May 2012.

Job Outlook
Employment of agricultural engineers is projected to grow 5 percent from 2012 to 2022, slower than the average for all occupations. Agricultural engineers are pursuing new areas related to agriculture, such as high-tech applications to agricultural products, water resource management, and alternative energies.

For More Information Click Here



Week of March 9-13

                                                                                                                VETERINARIANS 
What Veterinarians Do
Veterinarians care for the health of animals and work to improve public health. They diagnose, treat, and research medical conditions and diseases of pets, livestock, and other animals.

Work Environment
Although most veterinarians work in private clinics and hospitals, others travel to farms, work in laboratories or classrooms, or work for the government.

How to Become a Veterinarian
Veterinarians must have a Doctor of Veterinary Medicine degree from an accredited veterinary college and a state license.

Pay
The median annual wage for veterinarians was $84,460 in May 2012.

Job Outlook
Employment of veterinarians is projected to grow 12 percent from 2012 to 2022, about as fast as the average for all occupations. Candidates can expect very strong competition for available veterinarian positions. Those with specializations and prior work experience should have the best job opportunities.

For More Information Click Here



Week of February 9-13
                                                                                                                WEB DEVELOPERS
What Web Developers Do
Web developers design and create websites. They are responsible for the look of the site. They are also responsible for the site’s technical aspects, such as performance and capacity, which are measures of a website’s speed and how much traffic the site can handle. They also may create content for the site.

Work Environment
About a quarter of web developers were self-employed in 2012. Non-self-employed developers work primarily in the computer systems design and related services industry.

How to Become a Web Developer
The typical education needed to become a web developer is an associate’s degree in web design or related field. Web developers need knowledge of both programming and graphic design.

Pay
The median annual wage for web developers was $62,500 in May 2012.

Job Outlook
Employment of web developers is projected to grow 20 percent from 2012 to 2022, faster than the average for all occupations. Demand will be driven by the growing popularity of mobile devices and ecommerce.

For More Information Click Here


Week of February 2-6
                                                                                                              PHARMACISTS

What Pharmacists Do
Pharmacists dispense prescription medications to patients and offer expertise in the safe use of prescriptions. They also may provide advice on how to lead a healthy lifestyle, conduct health and wellness screenings, provide immunizations, and oversee the medications given to patients.

Work Environment
Pharmacists work in pharmacies, including those in grocery and drug stores. They also work in hospitals and clinics.

How to Become a Pharmacist
Pharmacists must have a Doctor of Pharmacy (Pharm.D.), a 4-year professional degree. They also must be licensed, which requires passing two exams.

Pay
The median annual wage for pharmacists was $116,670 in May 2012.

Job Outlook
Employment of pharmacists is projected to grow 14 percent from 2012 to 2022, about as fast as the average for all occupations. Increased demand for prescription medications will lead to more demand for pharmaceutical services.

For More Information Click Here


Week of January 26-30
                                                                                 CONSERVATION SCIENTISTS AND FORESTERS


What Conservation Scientists and Foresters Do
Conservation scientists and foresters manage overall land quality of forests, parks, rangelands, and other natural resources.

Work Environment
Conservation scientists and foresters work for governments (federal, state, or local), on privately owned lands, or in social advocacy organizations.

How to Become a Conservation Scientist or Forester
Conservation scientists and foresters typically need a bachelor’s degree in forestry or a related field. 

Pay
In May 2012, the median annual wage for conservation scientists was $61,100. The median annual wage for foresters was $55,950 in May 2012.

Job Outlook
Employment of conservation scientists and foresters is projected to grow 3 percent from 2012 to 2022, slower than the average for all occupations. Heightened demand for American timber and wood pellets will help increase the overall job prospects for conservation scientists and foresters.

For More Information Click Here


Week of January 12-15
                                                                                                            CIVIL ENGINEERS

What Civil Engineers Do
Civil engineers design, construct, supervise, operate, and maintain large construction projects and systems, including roads, buildings, airports, tunnels, dams, bridges, and systems for water supply and sewage treatment.

Work Environment
Civil engineers generally work indoors in offices. However, many spend time outdoors at construction sites so they can monitor operations or solve problems onsite. Most work full time.

How to Become a Civil Engineer
Civil engineers need a bachelor’s degree, either in civil engineering or civil engineering technology. They typically need a graduate degree and licensure for promotion to senior positions. Though licensure requirements vary within the U.S., civil engineers must usually be licensed in the locations where they provide services publicly.

Pay
The median annual wage for civil engineers was $79,340 in May 2012.

Job Outlook
Employment of civil engineers is projected to grow 20 percent from 2012 to 2022, faster than the average for all occupations. As infrastructure continues to age, civil engineers will be needed to manage projects to rebuild bridges, repair roads, and upgrade levees and dams.

For More Information Click Here


Week of January 5-9
AIRLINE AND COMMERCIAL PILOTS

What Airline and Commercial Pilots Do
Airline and commercial pilots fly and navigate airplanes, helicopters, and other aircraft. Airline pilots fly for airlines that transport people and cargo on a fixed schedule. Commercial pilots fly aircraft for other reasons, such as charter flights, rescue operations, firefighting, aerial photography, and aerial application, also known as crop dusting.

Work Environment
Pilots work primarily in aircraft. They may spend a considerable amount of time away from home because of overnight layovers. Many pilots have variable schedules.

How to Become an Airline or Commercial Pilot
Most airline pilots begin their careers as commercial pilots. Commercial pilots typically need a high school diploma or equivalent. Airline pilots typically need a bachelor’s degree. All pilots who are paid to fly must have at least a commercial pilot’s license from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). Additionally, airline pilots must have the Airline Transport Pilot (ATP) certificate. Pilots may need instrument and other ratings.

Pay
In May 2012, the median annual wage for airline pilots, copilots, and flight engineers was $114,200. The median annual wage for commercial pilots was $73,280 in May 2012.

Job Outlook
Employment of airline and commercial pilots is projected to show little or no change from 2012 to 2022. Low-cost regional airlines and nonscheduled aviation services will provide the most job opportunities. Pilots seeking jobs at the major airlines will face strong competition.

For More Information Click Here

Week of Dec 15-19
    
                                                                                            CHEFS AND HEAD COOKS
What Chefs and Head Cooks Do
Chefs and head cooks oversee the daily food preparation at restaurants and other places where food is served. They direct kitchen staff and handle any food-related concerns.

Work Environment
Chefs and head cooks work in restaurants, private households, and other establishments where food is served. They often work early mornings, late evenings, weekends, and holidays. The work can be hectic and fast paced. Most chefs and head cooks work full time.

How to Become a Chef or Head Cook
Most chefs and head cooks learn their skills through work experience. Others receive training at a community college, technical school, culinary arts school, or a 4-year college. A small number learn through apprenticeship programs or in the armed forces.

Pay
The median annual wage for chefs and head cooks was $42,480 in May 2012.

Job Outlook
Employment of chefs and head cooks is projected to grow 5 percent from 2012 to 2022, slower than the average for all occupations. Job opportunities will result from the need to replace workers who leave the occupation. Candidates can expect strong competition for jobs at upscale restaurants, hotels, and casinos, where the pay is typically highest.

For More Information Click Here



Week of Dec 8-12
                                                                        MULTIMEDIA ARTISTS AND ANIMATORS

What Multimedia Artists and Animators Do
Multimedia artists and animators create animation and visual effects for television, movies, video games, and other forms of media.

Work Environment
Multimedia artists and animators held about 68,900 jobs in 2012. In 2012, about 57 percent of workers were self-employed.

How to Become a Multimedia Artist or Animator
Most multimedia artists and animators need a bachelor’s degree in computer graphics, art, or a related field to develop a strong portfolio of work and learn the strong technical skills that many employers prefer. 

Pay
The median annual wage for multimedia artists and animators was $61,370 in May 2012.

Job Outlook
Employment of multimedia artists and animators is projected to grow 6 percent from 2012 to 2022, slower than the average for all occupations. Projected growth will be due to increased demand for animation and visual effects in video games, movies, and television.
 
For More Information Click Here

Week of Nov 24-28

POLICE AND DETECTIVES


What Police and Detectives Do
Police officers protect lives and property. Detectives and criminal investigators, who are sometimes called agents or special agents, gather facts and collect evidence of possible crimes.

Work Environment
Police and detective work can be physically demanding, stressful, and dangerous. Police officers have one of the highest rates of injuries and illnesses of all occupations. Working around the clock in shifts is common.

How to Become a Police Officer or Detective
Education requirements range from a high school diploma to a college, or higher, degree. Most police and detectives must graduate from their agency’s training academy before completing a period of on-the-job training. Candidates must be U.S. citizens, usually at least 21 years old, and able to meet rigorous physical and personal qualifications.

Pay
The median annual wage for police and detectives was $56,980 in May 2012.

Job Outlook
Employment of police and detectives is projected to grow 5 percent from 2012 to 2022, slower than the average for all occupations. Continued interest for public safety will lead to new openings for officers; however, jobs may be competitive, depending on location.

Similar Occupations
Compare the job duties, education, job growth, and pay of police and detectives with similar occupations.

For More Information Click Here



Week of Nov 17-21
        GEOSCIENTISTS

What Geoscientists Do
Geoscientists study the physical aspects of the Earth, such as its composition, structure, and processes, to learn about its past, present, and future.

Work Environment
Most geoscientists split their time between working in offices and laboratories, and working outdoors. Doing research and investigations outdoors is commonly called fieldwork and can require extensive travel to remote locations and irregular working hours.

How to Become a Geoscientist
Most geoscientist jobs require at least a bachelor’s degree. In several states, geoscientists may need a license to offer their services to the public.

Pay
The median annual wage for geoscientists was $90,890 in May 2012.

Job Outlook
Employment of geoscientists is projected to grow 16 percent from 2012 to 2022, faster than the average for all occupations. The need for energy, environmental protection, and responsible land and resource management is projected to spur demand for geoscientists in the future.

For More Information Click Here



Week of Nov 10-15
                                                                                                            ACTUARIES
What Actuaries Do
Actuaries analyze the financial costs of risk and uncertainty. They use mathematics, statistics, and financial theory to assess the risk that an event will occur and they help businesses and clients develop policies that minimize the cost of that risk. Actuaries’ work is essential to the insurance industry.

Work Environment
Most actuaries work full time in an office setting. Actuaries who work as consultants may frequently travel to meet with clients.

How to Become an Actuary
Actuaries need a bachelor’s degree and must pass a series of exams to become certified professionals. They must have a strong background in mathematics, statistics, and business.

Pay
The median annual wage for actuaries was $93,680 in May 2012.

Job Outlook
Employment of actuaries is projected to grow 26 percent from 2012 to 2022, much faster than the average for all occupations. Actuaries will be needed to develop, price, and evaluate a variety of insurance products and calculate the costs of new risks.

For More Information Click Here




Week of Nov 3-7
                                                                                                    INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERS

What Industrial Engineers Do
Industrial engineers find ways to eliminate wastefulness in production processes. They devise efficient ways to use workers, machines, materials, information, and energy to make a product or provide a service.

Work Environment
Depending on their tasks, industrial engineers work both in offices and in the settings they are trying to improve. For example, when observing problems, they may watch workers assembling parts in a factory or staff carrying out their tasks in a hospital. When solving problems, they may be in an office at a computer looking at data that they or others have collected.

How to Become an Industrial Engineer
Industrial engineers need a bachelor's degree, typically in industrial engineering. However, many industrial engineers have degrees in mechanical engineering, manufacturing engineering, industrial engineering technology, or general engineering.

Pay
The median annual wage for industrial engineers was $78,860 in May 2012.

Job Outlook
Employment of industrial engineers is projected to grow 5 percent from 2012 to 2022, slower than the average for all occupations. This occupation is versatile both in the kind of work it does and in the industries in which its expertise can be put to use.

Similar Occupations
Compare the job duties, education, job growth, and pay of industrial engineers with similar occupations.

For More Information Click Here



Week of Oct 27-31
DENTISTS
What Dentists Do
Dentists diagnose and treat problems with a patient’s teeth, gums, and related parts of the mouth. They provide advice and instruction on taking care of teeth and gums and on diet choices that affect oral health.

Work Environment
Dentists held about 146,800 jobs in 2012. Some dentists own their own businesses and work alone or with a small staff.

How to Become a Dentist
Dentists must be licensed in all states; requirements vary by state. To qualify for a license in most states, applicants must graduate from an accredited dental school and pass written and practical exams.

Pay
The median annual wage for dentists was $149,310 in May 2012.

Job Outlook
Employment of dentists is projected to grow 16 percent from 2012 to 2022, faster than the average for all occupations.

Similar Occupations
Compare the job duties, education, job growth, and pay of dentists with similar occupations.

For More Information Click Here




Week of Oct 20-25
                                                                     AEROSPACE ENGINEERS

What Aerospace Engineers Do
Aerospace engineers design aircraft, spacecraft, satellites, and missiles. In addition, they test prototypes to make sure that they
function according to design.

Work Environment
Aerospace engineers are employed in industries whose workers design or build aircraft, missiles, systems for national defense, or spacecraft. Aerospace engineers are employed primarily in analysis and design, manufacturing, industries that perform research and development, and the federal government.

How to Become an Aerospace Engineer
Aerospace engineers must have a bachelor’s degree in aerospace engineering or another field of engineering or science related to aerospace systems. Some aerospace engineers work on projects that are related to national defense and thus require security clearances.

Pay
The median annual wage for aerospace engineers was $103,720 in May 2012.

Job Outlook
Employment of aerospace engineers is projected to grow 7 percent from 2012 to 2022, slower than the average for all occupations. Some aerospace engineers work on projects that are related to national defense and thus require security clearances. This requirement will help to keep jobs in the United States.

For More Information Click Here


Week of Oct 14-18
                                    REPORTERS, CORRESPONDENTS, AND BROADCAST NEWS ANALYSTS


What Reporters, Correspondents, and Broadcast News Analysts Do
Reporters, correspondents, and broadcast news analysts inform the public about news and events happening internationally, nationally, and locally. They report the news for newspapers, magazines, websites, television, and radio.

Work Environment
Reporters and correspondents spend a lot of time in the field, conducting interviews and investigating stories. The work is often fast paced, with constant demands to meet deadlines and to be the first reporter to publish a news story on a subject.

How to Become a Reporter, Correspondent, or Broadcast News Analyst
Employers generally prefer workers who have a bachelor’s degree in journalism or communications along with an internship or work experience from a college radio or television station or a newspaper.

Pay
In May 2012, the median annual wage for reporters and correspondents was $35,870. The median annual wage for broadcast news analysts was $55,380 in May 2012.

Job Outlook
Employment of reporters, correspondents, and broadcast news analysts is projected to decline 13 percent from 2012 to 2022. Declining advertising revenue in radio, newspapers, and television will negatively impact the employment growth for these occupations.

Similar Occupations
Compare the job duties, education, job growth, and pay of reporters, correspondents, and broadcast news analysts with similar occupations. 

For More Information Click Here



Week of Oct 6-10
COMPUTER PROGRAMMER


What Computer Programmers Do
Computer programmers write code to create software programs. They turn the program designs created by software developers and engineers into instructions that a computer can follow.

Work Environment
Programmers usually work in offices, most commonly in the computer systems design and related services industry.

How to Become a Computer Programmer
Most computer programmers have a bachelor’s degree; however, some employers hire workers with an associate’s degree. Most programmers specialize in a few programming languages.

Pay
The median annual wage for computer programmers was $74,280 in May 2012.

Job Outlook
Employment of computer programmers is projected to grow 8 percent from 2012 to 2022, about as fast as the average for all occupations. Computer programming can be done from anywhere in the world, so companies sometimes hire programmers in countries where wages are lower.

Similar Occupations
Compare the job duties, education, job growth, and pay of computer programmers with similar occupations.

For More Information Click Here



Week of Sept 29-Oct 3
BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERS
What Biomedical Engineers Do
Biomedical engineers analyze and design solutions to problems in biology and medicine, with the goal of improving the quality and effectiveness of patient care.

Work Environment
Biomedical engineers work in manufacturing, universities, hospitals, research facilities of companies and educational and medical institutions, and government regulatory agencies. They usually work full time.

How to Become a Biomedical Engineer
Biomedical engineers typically need a bachelor’s degree in biomedical engineering from an accredited program to enter the occupation. Alternatively, they can get a bachelor’s degree in a different field of engineering and then either get a graduate degree in biomedical engineering or get on-the-job training in biomedical engineering.

Pay
The median annual wage for biomedical engineers was $86,960 in May 2012.

Job Outlook
Employment of biomedical engineers is projected to grow 27 percent from 2012 to 2022, much faster than the average for all occupations. Demand will be strong because an aging population is likely to need more medical care and because of increased public awareness of biomedical engineering advances and their benefits.

Similar Occupations
Compare the job duties, education, job growth, and pay of biomedical engineers with similar occupations.

For More Information Click Here


Week of Sept 22-26
                                                EMERGENCY MEDICAL TECHNICIANS AND PARAMEDICS


What EMTs and Paramedics Do
Emergency medical technicians (EMTs) and paramedics care for the sick or injured in emergency medical settings. People’s lives often depend on their quick reaction and competent care. EMTs and paramedics respond to emergency calls, performing medical services and transporting patients to medical facilities.

Work Environment
Most EMTs and paramedics work full time. EMTs and paramedics experience a much larger than average number of work-related injuries or illnesses.

How to Become an EMT or Paramedic
All emergency medical technicians (EMTs) and paramedics must complete a postsecondary educational program. All states require EMTs and paramedics to be licensed; requirements vary by state.

Pay
The median annual wage for emergency medical technicians (EMTs) and paramedics was $31,020 in May 2012.

Job Outlook
Employment of emergency medical technicians (EMTs) and paramedics is projected to grow 23 percent from 2012 to 2022, much faster than the average for all occupations.

Similar Occupations
Compare the job duties, education, job growth, and pay of EMTs and paramedics with similar occupations.

For More Information Click Here

Week of Sept 15-19
                                                                                   FORENSIC SCIENCE TECHNICIANS


What Forensic Science Technicians Do
Forensic science technicians help investigate crimes by collecting and analyzing physical evidence. Many technicians specialize in either crime scene investigation or laboratory analysis. Most forensic science technicians spend some time writing reports.

Work Environment
Most laboratory forensic science technicians work full time during normal business hours. Crime scene investigators may work long hours, and travel to crime scenes within their jurisdiction.

How to Become a Forensic Science Technician
Forensic science technicians typically need at least a bachelor’s degree in the natural sciences, such as chemistry or biology. On-the-job training is usually required for both those who investigate crime scenes and those who work in labs.

Pay
The median annual wage for forensic science technicians was $52,840 in May 2012.

Job Outlook
Employment of forensic science technicians is projected to grow 6 percent from 2012 to 2022, slower than the average for all occupations. Competition for jobs will be strong because of substantial interest in forensic science.

Similar Occupations
Compare the job duties, education, job growth, and pay of forensic science technicians with similar occupations.

For More Information Click Here


Week of Sept 8-12

                                                                                        ACCOUNTANTS AND AUDITORS

What Accountants and Auditors Do
Accountants and auditors prepare and examine financial records. They ensure that financial records are accurate and that taxes are paid properly and on time. Accountants and auditors assess financial operations and work to help ensure that organizations run efficiently.

Work Environment
Most accountants and auditors work full time. In 2012, about 1 in 5 worked more than 40 hours per week. Longer hours are typical at certain times of the year, such as at the end of the budget year or during tax season.

How to Become an Accountant or Auditor
Most employers require a candidate to have a bachelor’s degree in accounting or a related field. Certification within a specific field of accounting improves job prospects. For example, many accountants become Certified Public Accountants (CPAs).

Pay
The median annual wage for accountants and auditors was $63,550 in May 2012.

Job Outlook
Employment of accountants and auditors is projected to grow 13 percent from 2012 to 2022, about as fast as the average for all occupations. In general, employment growth of accountants and auditors is expected to be closely tied to the health of the overall economy. As the economy grows, these workers will continue to be needed to prepare and examine financial records.

Similar Occupations
Compare the job duties, education, job growth, and pay of accountants and auditors with similar occupations.

For More Information Click Here


Week Of Sept 2-5                                                               
 MICROBIOLOGISTS

What Microbiologists Do
Microbiologists study microorganisms such as bacteria, viruses, algae, fungi, and some types of parasites. They try to understand how these organisms live, grow, and interact with their environments.


Work Environment
Microbiologists work in laboratories and offices, where they conduct scientific experiments and analyze the results. Most microbiologists work full time and keep regular hours.


How to Become a Microbiologist
A bachelor’s degree in microbiology or a closely related field is needed for entry-level microbiologist jobs. A Ph.D. is typically needed to carry out independent research and to work in colleges and universities.


Pay
The median annual wage for microbiologists was $66,260 in May 2012.


Job Outlook
Employment of microbiologists is projected to grow 7 percent from 2012 to 2022, slower than the average for all occupations. More microbiologists will be needed to contribute to basic research, solve problems encountered in industrial production processes, and monitor environmental conditions to ensure the public’s health and safety.


Similar Occupations
Compare the job duties, education, job growth, and pay of microbiologists with similar occupations.


For more information CLICK HERE.


Week of May 12-16
ATMOSPHERIC SCIENTISTS & METEOROLOGISTS

What Atmospheric Scientists, Including Meteorologists Do:
Atmospheric scientists study the weather and climate, and how it affects human activity and the earth in general.

Work Environment:
Most atmospheric scientists work indoors in weather stations, offices, or laboratories. Occasionally, they do fieldwork, which means working outdoors to examine the weather. Some atmospheric scientists may have to work extended hours during weather emergencies.

How to Become an Atmospheric Scientist:
Atmospheric scientists need a bachelor’s degree in atmospheric science or a closely related field for most positions. Those who work in research usually need a master’s degree or a Ph.D.

Pay:
The median annual wage for atmospheric scientists was $89,260 in May 2012.

Job Outlook:
Employment of atmospheric scientists is projected to grow 10 percent from 2012 to 2022, about as fast as the average for all occupations. The best job prospects for atmospheric scientists will be in private industry.

For more information CLICK HERE.



Week of May 5-9
ANTHROPOLOGISTS & ARCHAEOLOGISTS

What Anthropologists and Archaeologists Do:

Anthropologists and archaeologists study the origin, development, and behavior of humans. They examine the cultures, languages, archaeological remains, and physical characteristics of people in various parts of the world.

Work Environment:
Although most anthropologists and archaeologists work in an office, some analyze samples in laboratories or work in the field. They typically work in research organizations, colleges and universities, museums, consulting firms, private corporations, and government. Fieldwork in remote areas usually requires travel for extended periods.

How to Become an Anthropologist or Archaeologist:
Anthropologists and archaeologists need a master’s degree or Ph.D. in anthropology or archaeology. Experience doing anthropological or archaeological fieldwork is also important. Bachelor’s degree holders may find work as assistants or fieldworkers.

Pay:
The median annual wage for anthropologists and archaeologists was $57,420 in May 2012.

Job Outlook:
Employment of anthropologists and archaeologists is projected to grow 19 percent from 2012 to 2022, faster than the average for all occupations. However, because it is a small occupation, the fast growth will result in only about 1,400 new jobs over the 10-year period. Job seekers will likely face very strong competition.

For more information CLICK HERE.




Week of Apr 21-25
ATHLETIC TRAINERS & EXERCISE PHYSIOLOGISTS

What Athletic Trainers and Exercise Physiologists Do:
Athletic trainers specialize in preventing, diagnosing, and treating muscle and bone injuries and illnesses. Exercise physiologists develop fitness and exercise programs that help patients recover from chronic diseases and improve cardiovascular function, body composition, and flexibility.

Work Environment:
Many athletic trainers work in educational settings, such as colleges or universities. Others work in physicians' offices or for professional sports teams. Exercise physiologists work in hospitals, outpatient clinics, and university laboratories.

How to Become an Athletic Trainer or Exercise Physiologist:
Athletic trainers and exercise physiologists need at least a bachelor’s degree. In most states, athletic trainers need a license or certification; requirements vary by state.

Pay:
In May 2012, the median annual wage for athletic trainers was $42,090. The median annual wage for exercise physiologists was $44,770 in May 2012.

Job Outlook:
Employment of athletic trainers and exercise physiologists is projected to grow 19 percent from 2012 to 2022, faster than the average for all occupations. As people become more aware of sports-related injuries at a young age, demand for athletic trainers is expected to increase, most significantly in colleges, universities, and youth leagues.

For more information CLICK HERE.




Week of Mar 31-Apr 4
COMPUTER SYSTEM ANALYSTS

What Computer Systems Analysts Do:
Computer systems analysts study an organization’s current computer systems and procedures and design information systems solutions to help the organization operate more efficiently and effectively. They bring business and information technology (IT) together by understanding the needs and limitations of both.

Work Environment:
Most systems analysts work full time. About a quarter worked more than 40 hours per week in 2012.

How to Become a Computer Systems Analyst:
A bachelor’s degree in a computer or information science field is common, although not always a requirement. Some firms hire analysts with business or liberal arts degrees who have skills in information technology or computer programming.

Pay:
The median annual wage for computer systems analysts was $79,680 in May 2012.

Job Outlook:
Employment of computer systems analysts is projected to grow 25 percent from 2012 to 2022, much faster than the average for all occupations. Growth in cloud computing, cybersecurity, and mobile networks will increase demand for these workers.

For more information CLICK HERE.




Week of Mar 26-28
VETERINARIANS

What Veterinarians Do:
Veterinarians care for the health of animals and work to improve public health. They diagnose, treat, and research medical conditions and diseases of pets, livestock, and other animals.

Work Environment:
Although most veterinarians work in private clinics and hospitals, others travel to farms, work in laboratories or classrooms, or work for the government.

How to Become a Veterinarian:
Veterinarians must have a Doctor of Veterinary Medicine degree from an accredited veterinary college and a state license.

Pay:
The median annual wage for veterinarians was $84,460 in May 2012.

Job Outlook:
Employment of veterinarians is projected to grow 12 percent from 2012 to 2022, about as fast as the average for all occupations. Candidates can expect very strong competition for available veterinarian positions. Those with specializations and prior work experience should have the best job opportunities.


For more information CLICK HERE.




Week of Mar 17-21

LAWYERS

What Lawyers Do:
Lawyers advise and represent individuals, businesses, and government agencies on legal issues and disputes.

Work Environment:
The majority of lawyers work in private and corporate legal offices. Some work for local, state, and federal governments. The majority work full time, and many work long hours.

How to Become a Lawyer:
All lawyers must have a law degree and must also typically pass a state’s written bar examination.

Pay:
The median annual wage for lawyers was $113,530 in May 2012.

Job Outlook:
Employment of lawyers is projected to grow 10 percent from 2012 to 2022, about as fast as the average for all occupations. Competition for jobs should continue to be strong because more students graduate from law school each year than there are jobs available.


For more information CLICK HERE.




Week of Marc 10-14
NATURAL SCIENCES MANAGERS

What Natural Sciences Managers Do:
Natural sciences managers supervise the work of scientists, including chemists, physicists, and biologists. They direct activities related to research and development, and coordinate activities such as testing, quality control, and production.

Work Environment:
Natural sciences managers spend most of their time in offices, but they also may spend time in laboratories. Most natural sciences managers work full time.

Natural sciences managers need at least a bachelor’s degree in a natural science or a related field. Most natural sciences managers work as scientists before becoming managers.

Pay:
The median annual wage for natural sciences managers was $115,730 in May 2012.

Job Outlook:
Employment of natural sciences managers is projected to grow 6 percent from 2012 to 2022, slower than the average for all occupations. Employment growth should be affected by many of the same factors that affect employment growth for the scientists whom these managers supervise.

For more information CLICK HERE.



Week of Mar 3-7
DENTISTS

What Dentists Do:
Dentists diagnose and treat problems with a patient’s teeth, gums, and related parts of the mouth. They provide advice and instruction on taking care of teeth and gums and on diet choices that affect oral health.

Work Environment:
Dentists held about 146,800 jobs in 2012. Some dentists own their own businesses and work alone or with a small staff.

How to Become a Dentist:
Dentists must be licensed in all states; requirements vary by state. To qualify for a license in most states, applicants must graduate from an accredited dental school and pass written and practical exams.

Pay:
The median annual wage for dentists was $149,310 in May 2012.

Job Outlook:
Employment of dentists is projected to grow 16 percent from 2012 to 2022, faster than the average for all occupations.

For more information CLICK HERE.


Week of Feb 24-28
PHYSICIANS & SURGEONS

What Physicians and Surgeons Do:
Physicians and surgeons diagnose and treat injuries or illnesses. Physicians examine patients; take medical histories; prescribe medications; and order, perform, and interpret diagnostic tests. They counsel patients on diet, hygiene, and preventive healthcare. Surgeons operate on patients to treat injuries, such as broken bones; diseases, such as cancerous tumors; and deformities, such as cleft palates.

Work Environment:
Physicians and surgeons held about 691,400 jobs in 2012. Many physicians work in private offices or clinics, often with administrative and healthcare personnel.

How to Become a Physician or Surgeon:
Physicians and surgeons have demanding education and training requirements. Almost all physicians complete at least 4 years of undergraduate school, 4 years of medical school, and, depending on their specialty, 3 to 8 years in internship and residency programs.

Pay:
Wages for physicians and surgeons are among the highest of all occupations. According to the Medical Group Management Association’s Physician Compensation and Production Survey, median total compensation for physicians varied with their type of practice. In 2012, physicians practicing primary care received total median annual compensation of $220,942 and physicians practicing in medical specialties received total median annual compensation of $396,233.

Job Outlook:
Employment of physicians and surgeons is projected to grow 18 percent from 2012 to 2022, faster than the average for all occupations. Job growth will occur because of the continued expansion of healthcare-related industries.

For more information CLICK HERE.


Week of Feb 17-21
WEB DEVELOPERS

What Web Developers Do:
Web developers design and create websites. They are responsible for the look of the site. They are also responsible for the site’s technical aspects, such as performance and capacity, which are measures of a website’s speed and how much traffic the site can handle. They also may create content for the site.

Work Environment:
About a quarter of web developers were self-employed in 2012. Non-self-employed developers work primarily in the computer systems design and related services industry.

How to Become a Web Developer:
The typical education needed to become a web developer is an associate’s degree in web design or related field. Web developers need knowledge of both programming and graphic design.

Pay:
The median annual wage for web developers was $62,500 in May 2012.

Job Outlook:
Employment of web developers is projected to grow 20 percent from 2012 to 2022, faster than the average for all occupations. Demand will be driven by the growing popularity of mobile devices and ecommerce.

For more information CLICK HERE.



Week of Feb 10-14
SPEECH-LANGUAGE PATHOLOGISTS

What Speech-Language Pathologists Do:
Speech-language pathologists (sometimes called speech therapists) assess, diagnose, treat, and help to prevent communication and swallowing disorders in 
patients. Speech, language, and swallowing disorders result from a variety of causes, such as a stroke, brain injury, hearing loss, developmental delay, a cleft palate, cerebral palsy, or emotional problems.

Work Environment:
Speech-language pathologists held about 134,100 jobs in 2012. Most speech-language pathologists work full time and almost half work in schools.

How to Become a Speech-Language Pathologist:
Speech-language pathologists typically need at least a master’s degree. They must be licensed in most states; requirements vary by state.

Pay:
The median annual wage for speech-language pathologists was $69,870 in May 2012.

Job Outlook:
Employment of speech-language pathologists is projected to grow 19 percent from 2012 to 2022, faster than the average for all occupations. As the large baby-boom population grows older, there will be more instances of health conditions that cause speech or language impairments, such as strokes and hearing loss.

For more information CLICK HERE.



Week of Feb 3-7
ARCHITECTURAL & ENGINEERING MANAGERS

What Architectural and Engineering Managers Do:
Architectural and engineering managers plan, coordinate, and direct activities in architectural and engineering companies.

Work Environment:
Most architectural and engineering managers spend their workday in an office. Some also may work in industrial plants and laboratories or at construction sites. Although most work full time, about half worked more than 40 hours a week in 2012.

How to Become an Architectural or Engineering Manager:
Architectural and engineering managers typically need at least a bachelor’s degree and considerable work experience as an architect or engineer.

Pay:
The median annual wage for architectural and engineering managers was $124,870 in May 2012.

Job Outlook:
Employment of architectural and engineering managers is projected to grow 7 percent from 2012 to 2022, slower than the average for all occupations. Employment growth will largely reflect the growth of the industries in which these managers are employed. Very strong competition for jobs can be expected.

For more information CLICK HERE.




Week of Jan 27-31

EPIDEMIOLOGISTS

What Epidemiologists Do:
Epidemiologists are public health professionals who investigate patterns and causes of disease and injury in humans. They seek to reduce the risk and occurrence of negative health outcomes through research, community education, and health policy.

Work Environment:
Epidemiologists work in offices and laboratories, usually at health departments for state and local governments, in hospitals, and at colleges and universities. Some do fieldwork to conduct interviews and collect samples for analyses. Fieldwork may bring epidemiologists into contact with infectious disease, but they very rarely get sick or suffer contagion.

Epidemiologists need at least a master’s degree from an accredited postsecondary institution. Most epidemiologists have a master’s in public health (MPH) or a related field, and some have a doctoral training in epidemiology.

Pay
The median annual wage for epidemiologists was $65,270 in May 2012.

Job Outlook: Employment of epidemiologists is projected to grow 10 percent from 2012 to 2022, about as fast as the average for all occupations. Epidemiologists are likely to have good job prospects overall.

For more information CLICK HERE.


Week of Jan 20-24

POLITICAL SCIENTISTS

What Political Scientists Do:
Political scientists study the origin, development, and operation of political systems. They research political ideas and analyze governments, policies, political trends, and related issues.

Work Environment:
Political scientists work full time in an office. They sometimes work overtime to finish reports and meet deadlines. About half worked in the federal government in 2012.

How to Become a Political Scientist:
Political scientists need a master’s degree or Ph.D. in political science, public administration, or a related field.

Pay:
The median annual wage for political scientists was $102,000 in May 2012.

Job Outlook:
Employment of political scientists is projected to grow 21 percent from 2012 to 2022, faster than the average for all occupations. However, because it is a small occupation, the fast growth will result in only about 1,400 new jobs over the 10-year period. Political scientists should face strong competition for jobs as the number of candidates is expected to exceed the number of available positions.

For more information CLICK HERE.




Week of Jan 13-17

PHYSICISTS & ASTRONOMERS

What Physicists and Astronomers Do:
Physicists and astronomers study the ways in which various forms of matter and energy interact. Theoretical physicists and astronomers may study the nature of time or the origin of the universe. Physicists and astronomers in applied fields may develop new military technologies or new sources of energy, or monitor space debris that could endanger satellites.

Work Environment:
Physicists and astronomers spend much of their time working in offices, but they also conduct research in laboratories and observatories. Most physicists and astronomers work full time.

How to Become a Physicist or Astronomer:
Physicists and astronomers need a Ph.D. for most research jobs. Many physics and astronomy Ph.D. holders typically begin their careers in temporary postdoctoral research positions.

Pay
In May 2012, the median annual wage for physicists was $106,840. The median annual wage for astronomers was $96,460 in May 2012.

Job Outlook:
Employment of physicists and astronomers is projected to grow 10 percent from 2012 to 2022, about as fast as the average for all occupations. Expected growth in federal government spending for physics and astronomy research should increase the need for physicists and astronomers, especially at colleges and universities and national laboratories.

For more information CLICK HERE.




Week of Jan 6-10

URBAN & REGIONAL PLANNERS

What Urban and Regional Planners Do:
Urban and regional planners develop plans and programs for the use of land. Their plans help create communities, accommodate population growth, and revitalize physical facilities in towns, cities, counties, and metropolitan areas. 

Work Environment:
About 2 in 3 urban and regional planners worked in local government in 2012. They often attend meetings with neighborhood groups that take place during evenings and weekends. 

How to Become an Urban or Regional Planner:
Urban and regional planners usually need a master’s degree from an accredited planning program to qualify for most positions. 

Pay: 
The median annual wage for urban and regional planners was $65,230 in May 2012. 

Job Outlook :
Employment of urban and regional planners is projected to grow 10 percent from 2012 to 2022, about as fast as the average for all occupations. Population growth, economic conditions, and environmental concerns will drive employment growth for planners in cities, suburbs, and other areas.

For more information CLICK HERE.



Week of Dec 16-20

ZOOLOGISTS & WILDLIFE BIOLOGISTS


What Zoologists and Wildlife Biologists Do:
Zoologists and wildlife biologists study the characteristics and habitats of animals and wildlife.

Work Environment:
Zoologists and wildlife biologists work in offices, laboratories, and outdoors. Most zoologists and wildlife biologists work full time.

How to Become a Zoologist or Wildlife Biologist:
Zoologists and wildlife biologists need a bachelor’s degree for entry-level jobs, but a master’s degree is often needed for advancement. A Ph.D. is necessary for most independent research and for college teaching jobs.

Pay:
The median annual wage of zoologists and wildlife biologists was $57,430 in May 2010.

Job Outlook:
Employment of zoologists and wildlife biologists is projected to grow by 7 percent from 2010 to 2020, slower than the average for all occupations. More zoologists and wildlife biologists will be needed to study the impact of human population growth and development on wildlife and its habitats.
For more information CLICK HERE.



Week of Dec 9-13

GRAPHIC DESIGNERS

What Graphic Designers Do:
Graphic designers create visual concepts, by hand or using computer software, to communicate ideas that inspire, inform, or captivate consumers. They help to make an organization recognizable by selecting color, images, or logo designs that represent a particular idea or identity to be used in advertising and promotions.

Work Environment:
Most of these workers are employed in specialized design services, publishing, or advertising, public relations and related services. In 2010, about 29 percent of graphic designers were self-employed.

How to Become a Graphic Designer:
A bachelor’s degree in graphic design or a related field is usually required for jobs in this field. Candidates should demonstrate their creativity and originality through a professional portfolio that features their best designs.

Pay:
The median annual wage of graphic designers was $43,500 in May 2010.

Job Outlook:
Employment of graphic designers is projected to increase by 13 percent from 2010 to 2020, about as fast as the average for all occupations. High job turnover should result in numerous openings. However, competition for senior graphic designer positions will be very strong.

For more information CLICK HERE.



Week of Dec 2-6

GEOLOGICAL & PETROLEUM TECHNICIANS

What Geological and Petroleum Technicians Do:
Geological and petroleum technicians provide support to scientists and engineers in exploring and extracting natural resources, such as minerals, oil, and natural gas.

Work Environment:
Geological and petroleum technicians work in offices, laboratories, and the field. Most geological and petroleum technicians work full time.

How to Become a Geological or Petroleum Technician:
Most employers prefer applicants who have at least an associate’s degree or 2 years of postsecondary training in applied science or a science-related technology. Geological and petroleum technicians also receive on-the-job training.

Pay:
The median annual wage of geological and petroleum technicians was $54,020 in May 2010.

Job Outlook:
Employment of geological and petroleum technicians is expected to increase by 15 percent from 2010 to 2020, about as fast as the average for all occupations. High prices and growing demand for natural resources, especially oil and natural gas, are expected to increase demand for geological exploration and extraction in the future.For more information CLICKHERE.



Week of Nov 18-22

ATHLETIC TRAINERS

What Athletic Trainers Do :
Athletic trainers specialize in preventing, diagnosing, and treating muscle and bone injuries and illnesses. They work with people of all ages and all skill levels, from young children to soldiers and professional athletes. 

Work Environment:
Many athletic trainers work in educational settings, such as secondary schools or colleges. Others work in physicians' offices or for professional sports teams. Some spend much of their time working outdoors on sports fields in all types of weather. 

How to Become an Athletic Trainer:
Athletic trainers need at least a bachelor’s degree, although both bachelor’s and master's degrees are common. In most states, athletic trainers need a license or certification; requirements vary by state. 

Pay :
The median annual wage of athletic trainers was $41,600 in May 2010. 

Job Outlook:
Employment of athletic trainers is expected to grow by 30 percent from 2010 to 2020, much faster than the average for all occupations. As people become more aware of sports-related injuries at a young age, demand for athletic trainers is expected to increase, most significantly in schools and youth leagues.

For more information CLICK HERE.



Week of Nov 11-15

PSYCHOLOGISTS

What Psychologists Do :
Psychologists study mental processes and human behavior by observing, interpreting, and recording how people and other animals relate to one another and the environment.

Work Environment:
Some psychologists work independently, doing research or working only with patients or clients. Others work as part of a healthcare team, collaborating with physicians, social workers, and others to treat illness and promote overall wellness. Those in private practice have their own offices and set their own schedules, often working evenings and weekends.

How to Become a Psychologist:
Psychologists need a master’s, specialist, or doctoral degree in psychology. Practicing psychologists also need a license or certification.

Pay:
The median annual wage of psychologists was $68,640 in May 2010.

Job Outlook:
Employment of psychologists is expected to grow 22 percent from 2010 to 2020, faster than the average for all occupations. Job prospects should be best for those who have a doctoral degree in an applied specialty and those with a specialist or doctoral degree in school psychology.

For more information CLICK HERE.



Week of Nov 4-8

SET & EXHIBIT DESIGNERS

What Set and Exhibit Designers Do:
Set designers create sets for movie, television, theater, and other productions. They analyze scripts or other research documents to determine how many sets will be needed and how each set can best support the story. Exhibit designers create spaces to display products, art, or artifacts.

Work Environment:
Many set and exhibit designers move from one short-term full-time job to another, working for a series of employers rather than only one employer. About 30 percent were self-employed in 2010.

How to Become a Set or Exhibit Designer:
Set and exhibit designers often need a bachelor’s degree in set design, scenic design, or theater.

Pay:
The median annual wage of set and exhibit designers was $46,680 in May 2010.

Job Outlook:
Employment of set and exhibit designers is expected to grow by 10 percent from 2010 to 2020, about as fast as the average for all occupations. Scripted television programming is expected to grow as the number of cable channels expand, and set and exhibit designers will continue to be needed to create sets for shows on these channels.

For more information CLICK HERE.



Week of Oct 28- Nov 1

MECHANICAL ENGINEERS

What Mechanical Engineers Do:
Mechanical engineering is one of the broadest engineering disciplines. Mechanical engineers design, develop, build, and test mechanical devices, including tools, engines, and machines.

Work Environment:
Mechanical engineers generally work in professional office settings. They may occasionally visit worksites where a problem or piece of equipment needs their personal attention. Mechanical engineers work mostly in engineering services, research and development, manufacturing industries, and the federal government.

How to Become a Mechanical Engineer:
Mechanical engineers need a bachelor’s degree. A graduate degree is typically needed for promotion into managerial positions. Mechanical engineers who sell services publicly must be licensed in all states and the District of Columbia.

Pay:
The median annual wage of mechanical engineers was $78,160 in May 2010.

Job Outlook:
Employment of mechanical engineers is expected to grow 9 percent from 2010 to 2020, slower than the average for all occupations. Job prospects may be best for those who stay abreast of the most recent advances in technology.

For more information CLICK HERE.



Week of Oct 21-25

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENTISTS AND SPECIALISTS


What Environmental Scientists and Specialists Do: 
Environmental scientists and specialists use their knowledge of the natural sciences to protect the environment. They identify problems and find solutions that minimize hazards to the health of the environment and the population. 

Work Environment:
Environmental scientists and specialists work in offices and laboratories. They also may spend time in the field gathering data and monitoring environmental conditions firsthand. Most environmental scientists and specialists work full time. 

How to Become an Environmental Scientist or Specialist:
Environmental scientists and specialists need at least a bachelor’s degree in a natural science for most entry-level jobs. 

Pay:
The median annual wage of environmental scientists and specialists was $61,700 in May 2010. 

Job Outlook:
Employment of environmental scientists and specialists is projected to grow by 19 percent from 2010 to 2020, about as fast as the average for all occupations. Heightened public interest in the hazards facing the environment, as well as the increasing demands placed on the environment by population growth, are expected to spur demand for environmental scientists and specialists.

For more information CLICK HERE.



Week of Oct 14-18

AIRLINE AND COMMERCIAL PILOTS

What Airline and Commercial Pilots Do:
Airline and commercial pilots fly and navigate airplanes or helicopters. Airline pilots fly for airlines that transport people and cargo on a fixed schedule. Commercial pilots fly aircraft for other reasons, such as charter flights, rescue operations, firefighting, aerial photography, and crop dusting.

Work Environment:
Pilots spend a considerable amount of time away from home because flights often involve overnight layovers. Those who fly international routes may experience jetlag. Many have variable schedules.

How to Become an Airline or Commercial Pilot:
Many pilots learn to fly in the military, but a growing number have an associate’s or bachelor’s degree from a civilian flight school. All pilots who are paid to transport passengers or cargo must have a commercial pilot's license and an instrument rating.

Pay:
In May 2010, median annual wages of airline pilots, copilots, and flight engineers were $103,210, and median annual wages of commercial pilots were $67,500.

Job Outlook:
Employment of airline and commercial pilots is expected to grow 11 percent from 2010 to 2020, about as fast as the average for all occupations. Regional airlines and low-cost carriers will present the best job opportunities. Pilots seeking jobs at the major airlines will face strong competition.

For more information CLICK HERE.



Week of Oct 7-11
ART DIRECTOR


What Art Directors Do: 
Art directors are responsible for the visual style and images in magazines, newspapers, product packaging, and movie and television productions. They create the overall design and direct others who develop artwork or layouts. 

Work Environment: 
About 12 percent of art directors work for advertising and public relations firms. Others work for newspaper and magazine publishers, specialized design services firms, and the motion picture and video industries. 

How to Become an Art Director:
Art directors need at least a bachelor’s degree in an art or design subject and previous work experience. Depending on the industry, they may have worked as graphic designers, illustrators, copyeditors, or photographers, or in another art or design occupation, before becoming art directors. 

Pay:
The median annual wage of art directors was $80,630 in May 2010. 

Job Outlook:
Employment of art directors is expected to increase 9 percent from 2010 to 2020, slower than the average for all occupations. Art directors will continue to be needed to oversee the work of graphic designers, illustrators, photographers, and others who design in artwork or layouts.

For more information CLICK HERE.



Week of September 30-October 4


BIOLOGICAL TECHNICIANS



What Biological Technicians Do:
Biological technicians help biological and medical scientists conduct laboratory tests and experiments.

Work Environment:
Biological technicians typically work in laboratories. Most biological technicians work full time.

How to Become a Biological Technician:
Biological technicians typically need a bachelor’s degree in biology or a closely related field. It is important for prospective biological technicians to gain laboratory experience while in school.

Pay:
The median annual wage of biological technicians was $39,020 in May 2010.

Job Outlook:
Employment of biological technicians is projected to grow 14 percent from 2010 to 2020, as fast as the average for all occupations. Continued growth in biotechnology and medical research is expected to increase demand for these workers.

For more information CLICK HERE.




Week of September 23-27

SOCIAL WORKERS


What Social Workers Do :
There are two main types of social workers: direct-service social workers, who help people solve and cope with problems in their everyday lives, and clinical social workers, who diagnose and treat mental, behavioral, and emotional issues.

Work Environment:
Social workers work in a variety of settings, including mental health clinics, schools, hospitals, and private practices. They generally work full time and may need to work evenings and weekends.

How to Become a Social Worker:
A bachelor’s degree is required for most direct-service social work positions, but some positions and settings require a master’s degree. Clinical social workers must have a master’s degree. Licensure for social workers varies by state. Clinical social workers must be licensed.

Pay:
The median annual wage of social workers was $42,480 in May 2010.

Job Outlook :
Employment of social workers is expected to grow by 25 percent from 2010 to 2020, faster than the average for all occupations. Growth will be due to an increase in demand for health care and social services but will vary by specialty.

For more information CLICK HERE.



Week of September 16-20
NUCLEAR TECHNICIANS



What Nuclear Technicians Do :
Nuclear technicians assist physicists, engineers, and other professionals in nuclear research and nuclear production. They operate special equipment used in these activities and monitor the levels of radiation that are produced.

Work Environment :
Most nuclear technicians work full time in the nuclear power industry. Nuclear technicians must take safety precautions to avoid exposure to radiation.

How to Become a Nuclear Technician :
Nuclear technicians typically enter the occupation with an associate’s degree in nuclear science or a nuclear-related technology. Nuclear technicians also go through extensive on-the-job training.

Pay:
The median annual wage of nuclear technicians was $68,090 in May 2010.

Job Outlook:
Employment of nuclear technicians is projected to grow by 14 percent from 2010 to 2020, as fast as the average for all occupations, because of greater demand for nuclear energy.

For more information CLICK HERE.



Week of September 9-13

ECONOMISTS



What Economists Do :
Economists study the production and distribution of resources, goods, and services. 

Work Environment :
Economists often work independently in an office. Although most work full time, some must work overtime to meet deadlines. 

How to Become an Economist :
Most economist jobs require an advanced degree, but some entry-level jobs are available with a bachelor’s degree. 

Pay:
The median annual wage of economists was $89,450 in May 2010. 

Job Outlook :
Employment of economists is projected to grow 6 percent from 2010 to 2020, slower than the average for all occupations. Those with a master’s degree or Ph.D. should have the best job opportunities.

For more information CLICK HERE.




Week of September 2-6

MARINE ENGINEERS AND NAVAL ARCHITECTS


What Marine Engineers and Naval Architects Do :
Marine engineers and naval architects design, build, and maintain ships from aircraft carriers to submarines, from sailboats to tankers. Marine engineers work on the mechanical systems, such as propulsion and steering. Naval architects work on the basic design, including the form and stability of hulls.

Work Environment :
Marine engineers and naval architects held about 5,900 jobs in 2010. They typically work in offices, where they have access to computer software and other tools necessary for analyzing projects and designing solutions. Sometimes, they must go to sea on the ships to test them or maintain them.

How to Become a Marine Engineer or Naval Architect:
Marine engineers and naval architects must have a bachelor’s degree in marine engineering, naval architecture, or marine systems engineering. Employers also value practical experience, so cooperative engineering programs, which provide college credit for structured job experience, are valuable.

Pay :
The median annual wage of marine engineers and naval architects was $79,920 in May 2010.

Job Outlook :
Employment of marine engineers and naval architects is expected to grow 17 percent from 2010 to 2020, about as fast as the average for all occupations. The need to design ships and systems to transport energy products, such as liquefied natural gas, across the globe will help to spur employment growth for this occupation.

For more information CLICK HERE.



Week of August 26-30

RESPIRATORY THERAPISTS



What Respiratory Therapists Do:
Respiratory therapists care for patients who have trouble breathing; for example, from a chronic respiratory disease, such as asthma or emphysema. They also provide emergency care to patients suffering from heart attacks, stroke, drowning, or shock.

Work Environment:
Most respiratory therapists work in hospitals. Others may work in nursing care facilities or travel to patients’ homes.

How to Become a Respiratory Therapist:
Respiratory therapists need at least an associate’s degree, although both associate’s and bachelor’s degrees are common. Respiratory therapists are licensed in all states except Alaska; requirements vary by state.

Pay:
The median annual wage of respiratory therapists was $54,280 in May 2010.

Job Outlook:
Employment is expected to grow by 28 percent from 2010 to 2020, faster than the average for all occupations. Growth in the middle-aged and elderly population will lead to greater demand for respiratory therapy services and treatments, mostly in hospitals and nursing homes.

For more information CLICK HERE.



Week of June 17 - June 21
TECHNICAL WRITERS


Technical writers, also called technical communicators, produce instruction manuals and other supporting documents to communicate complex and technical information more easily. They also develop, gather, and disseminate technical information among customers, designers, and manufacturers.

Work Environment: 
Most technical writers work full time in offices. Although technical writers work in a variety of industries, they are concentrated in the computer and engineering industries.

How to Become a Technical Writer
:
A college degree is usually required for a position as a technical writer. In addition, experience with a technical subject, such as computer science, Web design, or engineering, is important.

Pay: 
The median annual wage of technical writers was $63,280 in May 2010.

Job Outlook:
 
Employment of technical writers is expected to grow 17 percent from 2010 to 2020, about as fast as the average for all occupations. Job opportunities, especially for applicants with technical skills, are expected to be good.

For more info CLICK HERE.



Week of June 3 - June 7
MARKET RESEARCH ANALYSTS


Market research analysts study market conditions in local, regional, or national areas to examine potential sales of a product or service. They help companies understand what products people want, who will buy them, and at what price.

Work Environment: 
Market research analysts work in nearly every industry. They may work with the public to gather information and data, but they generally work at a computer, collecting and analyzing marketing data and preparing reports. Although most work full time during regular business hours, some may work long hours to meet deadlines.

How to Become a Market Research Analyst
:
Market research analysts need strong math and analytical skills. Most need at least a bachelor’s degree, and top research positions often require a master’s degree.

Pay: 
The median annual wage of market research analysts was $60,570 in May 2010.

Job Outlook:
 
Employment of market research analysts is expected to grow 41 percent from 2010 to 2020, much faster than the average for all occupations. Job prospects should be best for those with a master’s degree.

For more info CLICK HERE.



Week of May 20 - May 24
ZOOLOGISTS & WILDLIFE BIOLOGISTS


Zoologists and wildlife biologists study the characteristics and habitats of animals and wildlife.

Work Environment: 
Zoologists and wildlife biologists work in offices, laboratories, and outdoors. Most zoologists and wildlife biologists work full time.

How to Become a Zoologist or Wildlife Biologist
:
Zoologists and wildlife biologists need a bachelor’s degree for entry-level jobs, but a master’s degree is often needed for advancement. A Ph.D. is necessary for most independent research and for college teaching jobs.

Pay: 
The median annual wage of zoologists and wildlife biologists was $57,430 in May 2010.

Job Outlook:
 
Employment of zoologists and wildlife biologists is projected to grow by 7 percent from 2010 to 2020, slower than the average for all occupations. More zoologists and wildlife biologists will be needed to study the impact of human population growth and development on wildlife and its habitats.

For more info CLICK HERE.



Week of May 13 - May 17
COMPUTER PROGRAMMERS


Computer programmers write code to create software programs. They turn the program designs created by software developers and engineers into instructions that a computer can follow.

Work Environment: 
Computer programmers usually work in offices, most commonly in the computer systems design and related services industry and information services industry.

How to Become a Computer Programmer
:
Most computer programmers have a bachelor’s degree; however, some employers hire workers with an associate’s degree. Most programmers specialize in a few programming languages.

Pay: 
The median annual wage of computer programmers was $71,380 in May 2010.

Job Outlook:
 
Employment of computer programmers is expected to increase 12 percent from 2010 to 2020, about as fast as the average for all occupations. Since computer programming can be done from anywhere in the world, companies often hire programmers in countries that have lower wages.

For more info CLICK HERE.



Week of May 6 - May 10
DIETICIANS & NUTRITIONISTS


Dietitians and nutritionists are experts in food and nutrition. They advise people on what to eat in order to lead a healthy lifestyle or achieve a specific health-related goal.

Work Environment: 
Dietitians and nutritionists work in many settings, including hospitals, cafeterias, nursing homes, and schools. Some are self-employed with their own practice.

How to Become a Dietician or Nutritionist
:
Most dietitians and nutritionists have a bachelor’s degree and have participated in supervised training. Also, many states require dietitians and nutritionists to be licensed.

Pay: 
The median annual wage of dietitians and nutritionists was $53,250 in May 2010.

Job Outlook:
 
Employment of dietitians and nutritionists is expected to increase 20 percent from 2010 to 2020, faster than the average for all occupations.

For more info CLICK HERE.



Week of Apr 29 - May 3
SOCIAL & COMMUNITY SERVICE MANAGERS


Social and community service managers coordinate and supervise social service programs and community organizations. They direct and lead staff who provide services to the public.

Work Environment: 
Social and community service managers work for nonprofit organizations, private for-profit social service agencies, and government agencies. Most work full time.

How to Become a Social & Community Service Manager
:
Social and community service managers need at least a bachelor’s degree and some work experience. However, many employers prefer candidates who have a master’s degree.

Pay: 
The median annual wage of social and community service managers was $57,950 in May 2010.

Job Outlook:
 
Employment of social and community service managers is expected to grow by 27 percent from 2010 to 2020, faster than the average for all occupations. Growth is expected because increases in the aging population, increases in demand for substance abuse treatment, and overall population growth.

For more info CLICK HERE.



Week of Apr 21-25
COMPUTER HARDWARE ENGINEERS


Computer hardware engineers research, design, develop, and test computer equipment such as chips, circuit boards, or routers. By solving complex problems in computer hardware, these engineers create rapid advances in computer technology.

Work Environment: 
Computer hardware engineers usually work in research laboratories that build and test various types of computer models. Most work in high-tech manufacturing firms. Some work in computer systems design firms, research and development firms, or for the federal government.

How to Become a Computer Hardware Engineer
:
Most entry-level computer hardware engineers have a bachelor’s degree in computer engineering, although a degree in electrical engineering generally is acceptable.

Pay: 
The median annual wage of computer hardware engineers was $98,810 in May 2010.

Job Outlook:
 
Employment of computer hardware engineers is expected to increase 9 percent from 2010 to 2020, slower than the average for all occupations. A limited number of computer hardware engineers will be needed to meet the demand for new types of computer hardware because more innovation in computers now takes place with software than with hardware.

For more info CLICK HERE.



Week of Apr 8-12
MULTIMEDIA ARTISTS and ANIMATORS


Multimedia artists and animators create animation and visual effects for television,movies, video games, and other media. They create two- and three-dimensional models and animation.

Work Environment: 
Although most multimedia artists are self-employed, some work for the motion picture and video industry. They often work long hours, especially when deadlines are approaching.

How to Become a Multimedia Artist or Animator
:
Many multimedia artists and animators pursue a bachelor’s degree in computer graphics, art, or a related field to develop a good portfolio of work and learn the strong technical skills that many employers prefer.

Pay: 
The median annual wage of multimedia artists and animators was $58,510 in May 2010.

Job Outlook:
 
Employment of multimedia artists and animators is expected to grow by 8 percent from 2010 to 2020, slower than the average for all occupations. Expected growth will be due to increased demand for animation and visual effects in video games, movies, and television. However, growth will be slow as companies increasing hire animators who are overseas. In addition, competition for jobs will be tough because there are many people interested in entering the occupation.

For more info CLICK HERE.



Week of Apr 1-5
HEALTH AND SAFETY ENGINEERS


Health and safety engineers develop procedures and design systems to keep people from getting sick or injured and to keep property from being damaged. They combine knowledge of health or safety and of systems engineering to make sure that chemicals, machinery, software, furniture, and other products are not going to cause harm to people or buildings.

Work Environment: 
Health and safety engineers typically work in offices. However, they also must spend time at worksites when necessary, which sometimes requires travel.

How to Become a Health and Safety Engineer
:
Health and safety engineers must have a bachelor’s degree, typically in electrical, chemical, mechanical, industrial, or some other engineering discipline.

Pay: 
The median annual wage of health and safety engineers was $75,430 in May 2010.

Job Outlook:
 
Employment of health and safety engineers is expected to grow 13 percent between 2010 and 2020, about as fast as the average for all occupations. Although manufacturing and engineering companies will still be the main users of their services, health and safety engineers are being employed in new areas, such as health care, to prevent costly accidents involving people and equipment.

For more info CLICK HERE.



Week of Mar 18-22
PHYSICAL THERAPISTS


Physical therapists help people who have injuries or illnesses improve their movement and manage their pain. They are often an important part of rehabilitation and treatment of patients with chronic conditions or injuries.

Work Environment: 
Physical therapists typically work in private offices and clinics, hospitals, and nursing homes. They spend much of their time on their feet, actively working with patients.

How to Become a Physical Therapist
:
Physical therapists typically need a doctoral degree in physical therapy. All states require physical therapists to be licensed.

Pay: 
The median annual wage of physical therapists was $76,310 in May 2010.

Job Outlook:
 
Employment of physical therapists is expected to increase 39 percent from 2010 to 2020, much faster than the average for all occupations. Demand for physical therapy services will come, in large part, from the aging baby boomers, who are staying active later in life than previous generations did.

For more info CLICK HERE.



Week of Mar 11-15
ATMOSPHERIC SCIENTISTS


Atmospheric scientists (including Meteorologists) study weather, climate, and other aspects of the atmosphere. They develop reports and forecasts from their analysis of weather and climate data.

Work Environment: 
Most atmospheric scientists work indoors in weather stations, offices, or laboratories. Occasionally, they do fieldwork, which means working outdoors to examine the weather. Some atmospheric scientists may have to work extended hours during weather emergencies.

How to Become an Atmospheric Scientist
:
Atmospheric scientists need a bachelor’s degree in atmospheric science or a closely related field for most positions. Those who work in research usually need a master’s degree or a Ph.D.

Pay: 
The median annual wage of atmospheric scientists was $87,780 in May 2010.

Job Outlook:
 
Employment of atmospheric scientists is projected to increase by 11 percent from 2010 to 2020, about as fast as the average for all occupations. The best job prospects for atmospheric scientists will be in private industry.

For more info CLICK HERE.



Week of Mar 4-8
INDUSTRIAL DESIGNERS

What Industrial Designers Do:
Industrial designers develop the concepts for manufactured products, such as cars, home appliances, and toys. They combine art, business, and engineering to make products that people use every day.

Work Environment: 
Industrial designers work in offices in a variety of industries. Although they design manufactured products, only about 29 percent of industrial designers are employed directly by manufacturers.

How to Become an Industrial Designer
:
A bachelor’s degree is usually required for most entry-level industrial design jobs. It is also important for industrial designers to have a professional portfolio with examples of their best design projects.

Pay: 
The median annual wage of industrial designers was $58,230 in May 2010.

Job Outlook:
 
Employment of industrial designers is expected to grow by 10 percent from 2010 to 2020, about as fast as the average for all occupations. Increasing consumer demand for new products and new product styles should increase demand for industrial designers.

For more info CLICK HERE.




Week of Feb 25 - Mar 1
CHEMICAL ENGINEERS

What Chemical Engineers Do:
Chemical engineers apply the principles of chemistry, biology, and physics to solve problems. These problems involve the production or use of chemicals, fuel, drugs, food, and many other products. They design processes and equipment for large-scale safe and sustainable manufacturing, plan and test methods of manufacturing products and treating byproducts, and supervise production. 

Work Environment: 
Chemical engineers work mostly in offices or laboratories. They may spend time at industrial plants, refineries, and other locations, where they monitor or direct operations or solve onsite problems. Nearly all chemical engineers work full time. 

How to Become a Chemical Engineer
:
Chemical engineers must have a bachelor’s degree in chemical engineering, now sometimes known as a bachelor’s degree in chemical and biomolecular engineering. Employers also value practical experience, so cooperative engineering programs, in which students earn college credit for structured job experience, are valuable as well. Having a Professional Engineer license may increase chances for employment. 

Pay: 
The median annual wage of chemical engineers was $90,300 in May 2010. 

Job Outlook:
 
Employment of chemical engineers is expected to grow 6 percent from 2010 to 2020, slower than the average for all occupations. Demand for chemical engineers’ services depends largely on demand for the products of various manufacturing industries. 

For more info CLICK HERE.




Week of Feb 18-22
CHEMISTS & MATERIAL SCIENTISTS

What Chemists and Materials Scientists Do:
Chemists and materials scientists study the structures, compositions, reactions, and other properties of substances. They use their knowledge to develop new and improved products, processes, and materials.

Work Environment
:
Chemists and materials scientists work in laboratories and offices. They typically work full time and regular hours.

How to Become a Chemist or Materials Scientist:
Chemists and materials scientists need at least a bachelor’s degree in chemistry or a related field. However, a master’s degree or Ph.D. is needed for many research jobs.

Pay
:
The median annual wage of chemists was $68,320 in May 2010. The median annual wage of materials scientists was $84,720 in May 2010.

Job Outlook
:
Employment of chemists and materials scientists is expected to increase by 4 percent from 2010 to 2020, slower than the average for all occupations. Chemists and materials scientists with an advanced degree, particularly those with a Ph.D., are expected to experience better opportunities.
 
For more info CLICK HERE.
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