Our lab is also associated with the Center for Landscape Dynamics, a resource for local land managers and professors wanting to know more about landscape processes and sustainable management



Courses currently being taught by Erica Smithwick

GEOG 001

Global Parks & Sustainability

In this course, we will use parks and protected areas – both in the U.S. and internationally – as a framework for exploring broader themes of sustainability, conservation, and socio-ecological systems.  We will use case-studies that exemplify national (U.S.) and international parkscapes (i.e., parks and protected areas embedded within complex landscapes) that convey story of evolving attitudes and approaches toward conservation.  These stories will help explain the historical, transitioning, and future role of conservation in societies shaped by local ecologies, conflict, and change.  


GEOG 414

Principles and Applications in Landscape Ecology

The objective of this course is for students to apply the methods, theories, approaches and practical applications of landscape ecology to inform landscape decision-making.  Particular emphasis is placed on how humans modify landscapes and how species, ecological communities, and ecosystems have responded to these changes. These objectives will be met through lecture and discussion, computer laboratory exercises, written papers, and group presentations. Central topics will include scale, pattern quantification, spatial analysis tools (remote sensing, models), landscape dynamics, modeling, restoration, and urban ecology.  


 

GEOG 510

Terrestrial Ecosystem Modeling: Concepts & Applications
The goal of this course is to provide a multi-scalar and multi-disciplinary perspective on ecological principles underlying most ecological models, introduce students to the immense range of modeling approaches for understanding ecosystem dynamics in space and time (from ‘gap’ models to Earth System Models), and provide students an opportunity to apply contemporary models to current ecological problems.  Programming skills are not required



Helpful Links for Lab Work

Data management is really important and NSF, as well as many other major agencies and journals, now require that all data is archived and accessible.  Here are some lab guidelines and links that will help you do this:


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Lydia Olson,
Oct 14, 2015, 2:37 PM
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Lydia Olson,
Oct 14, 2015, 2:38 PM