South, South Central and Southeast Theatres




Welcome to the South L.A. Theatre Tour!


Can't find what you're looking for?

Well, the south and south central areas were dotted with
several hundred minor theatres (including many early nickelodeons)
 that haven't been written up here. For a more complete list check
 out our Theatres By Address page.



    History Resources    


The Arcadia Publishing book "Downey" by Larry Latimer
and the Downey Historical Society gives an interesting history.

See the Arcadia Publishing book "West Adams."

The website for the West Adams Heritage Association
has some articles on the history of the area. One of
 interest is West Adams and the Movies.

The West Adams - Normandie website has a nice
rundown on theatres in the area and links to LAPL photos.

Wikipedia also has a West Adams article.




    103rd St.   


Largo Theatre



    W. Adams Blvd.    


Adams Theatre


LaSalle Theatre

Luna Theatre

Riviera / Fremont Theatre

Variety Theatre



    Baldwin Hills    


Baldwin Theatre



     Bell     


Alcazar / Liberty Theatre

Alpha Theatre



    Bellflower   


Bellflower / Nubel / HolidayTheatre



    S. Central Ave.    


Florence Mills Theatre

    Crenshaw Blvd.    


Bard's West Adams

Crenshaw / Kokusai Theatre

Gardena Cinema

Mesa Theatre



    Downey    





    S. Figueroa St.    


Fox Figueroa Theatre

On our Downtown site:

1719 S. Figueroa


    Florence   


Castle Theatre


Florencita Theatre

Fox Florence Theatre

Gentry Theatre

Sunbeam Theatre




    Fullerton    





    Gage Ave.    


Alcazar / Liberty Theatre

Alpha Theatre



    Gardena    


Gardena Cinema



    Hawthorne    


Plaza Theatre



    Huntington Park    


California Theatre

Huntington Theatre


Lyric Theatre


Park Theatre




    Inglewood    


5th Avenue Theatre

Academy Theatre

Arcade Theatre

Fox Inglewood

Granada Theatre

Imperial Theatre

Inglewood Theatre

Ritz Theatre

United Artists



    Jefferson Blvd.    


Arlin Theatre

Shrine Auditorium


University / Realart / Trojan




    La Brea Ave.    


Baldwin Theatre


Inglewood Theatre



    La Tijera    

La Tijera Theatre



    Leimert Park    

 
Leimert / Vision Theatre



    Long Beach Blvd.    


Arden Theatre 

Lynwood Theatre 

Tower Theatre

Vogue Theatre
 


Also see our section on
Long Beach Theatres



    Lynwood    


Arden Theatre 

Lynwood Theatre 



    S. Main St.    


Princess Theatre

On our Downtown Theatres site:

1718 S. Main



    Manchester Blvd.    


5th Avenue Theatre

Academy Theatre

Manchester Theatre



     Market St.    


Fox Inglewood

Granada Theatre

Ritz Theatre

United Artists



     Olympic Blvd.    


On our Downtown site:

2361 E. Olympic
(formerly E. 9th St.)



    Pacific Blvd.    


California Theatre

Huntington Theatre

Lyric Theatre

Park Theatre


Warner Bros. Theatre



    Pico Blvd.    


See our Pico Boulevard page
for everything up and down Pico



    S. San Pedro St.   


Castle Theatre

On our Downtown Site:

Garden Theatre
1221 S. San Pedro



    Sepulveda Blvd.    


Loyola Theatre

Paradise Theatre



    South Gate    

 
Allen Theatre


Vogue Theatre 



    Torrance    


On our Theatres Along the Coast page:

Grand Theatre

Stadium/Pussycat Theatre

Torrance Theatre






    Western Ave.    


Carlton Theatre

Rio Theatre

Western Theatre

On the Wilshire Theatres site:

Fox Uptown

Wiltern Theatre

Embassy Theatre

Wilshire Theatre (1923)


Farther north on Western on our main
 [more] L.A. Movie Palaces page:


Cinema Theatre

Clinton Theatre

Sunset Theatre









    Alternate Name List    


This is just for theatres in the South, South Central
and Southeast areas of Los Angeles County. The links at
 the top of the page will direct you to other sections for
Pico Blvd., East Los Angeles and elsewhere

Can't find what you're looking for?

For a wider geographical area you might also check
the main the alphabetical theatre list where you'll
find all of the alternate names a particular
theatre went under are listed.

Also see the main LA theatres by street address list.


5th Avenue Theatre
2541 W. Manchester Blvd., Inglewood

Academy Theatre
3141 W. Manchester Blvd., Inglewood

Adams Theatre
1898 West Adams Blvd  West Adams

Adams Theatre, Fox see Bard's West Adams
4409 W. Adams Blvd. West Adams

Adams West see Bard's West Adams
4409 W. Adams Blvd. West Adams

Alcazar Theatre
4426 Gage Ave., Bell

Allen Theatre
3809 Tweedy Blvd. South Gate

Alpha Theatre
4065 Gage Ave.  Bell

Amusu Theatre see Florence Mills Theatre
3511 S. Central Ave.

Arcade Theatre
Queen St. Inglewood


Arden Theatre
11709 Long Beach Blvd.  Lynwood

Apollo West see Bard's West Adams
4409 W. Adams Blvd. West Adams

Arlin Theatre
2117 W. Jefferson Blvd.


Arlington Theatre
2517 W. Washington Blvd.


Arlington Theatre see Maynard Theatre
2488 W. Washington Blvd.

Avenue Theatre 
11022 Downey Ave., Downey

Balboa Theatre
8713 S. Vermont Ave.

Baldwin Theatre 
3741 S. La Brea Ave. Baldwin Hills

Bard's Theatre see Bard's West Adams
4409 W. Adams Blvd. West Adams

Bard's Adams Street see Bard's West Adams
4409 W. Adams Blvd. West Adams


Bard's Apollo see Bard's West Adams
4409 W. Adams Blvd. West Adams

Bell Theatre see Alcazar Theatre
4426 Gage Ave.  Bell

Bellflower Theatre  see Nubel Theatre
16711 Bellflower Blvd.  Bellflower

Boulevard Theatre
1615 W. Washington Blvd.

Cafe Club Fais Do-Do see Variety Theatre
5253 W. Adams Blvd.

California Theatre
6528 Pacific Blvd. Huntington Park

California 3 Theatres see California Theatre
6528 Pacific Blvd. Huntington Park

Carlton Theatre
5409 S. Western Ave.


Castle Theatre
8518 S. San Pedro St.


Chutes Theatre
Washington
Blvd. at S. Main St.

Cine see Ritz Theatre
226 S. Market St. Inglewood

Civic Auditorium see Shrine Auditorium
665 W. Jefferson

Columbia Theatre see Arlin Theatre
2117 W. Jefferson Blvd.

Compton see Fox Compton
136 E. Compton Blvd.   Compton

Congress Theatre
7506 S. Vermont Ave.

Continental Theatre see Union Theatre
1122 24th St.

Crenshaw Theatre
3020 Crenshaw Blvd.

Downey Theatre see Avenue Theatre 
11022 Downey Ave., Downey

Ebony Repertory Theatre see Rimpau Theatre
4720 W. Washington Blvd.

Ebony Showcase Theatre see Rimpau Theatre
4720 W. Washington Blvd.

Fairyland Theatre see Union Theatre
1122 24th St.

Fais Do-Do see Variety Theatre
5253 W. Adams Blvd.

Fifth Avenue Theatre
2541 W. Manchester Blvd., Inglewood

Figueroa Theatre see Fox Figueroa Theatre 
4011 S. Figueroa St.

Florence Theatre see Fox Florence Theatre 
1536 E. Florence Ave. 

Florence Mills Theatre
3511 S. Central Ave.

Florencita Theatre
1830 E. Florence Ave.   Florence-Graham

Fox Adams see Bard's West Adams
4409 W. Adams Blvd. West Adams

Fox Alcazar see Alcazar Theatre
4426 Gage Ave.  Bell

Fox Balboa see Balboa Theatre
8713 S. Vermont Ave.

Fox California see California Theatre
6528 Pacific Blvd. Huntington Park

Fox Cinema II  see United Artists
148 N. Market St. Inglewood

Fox Compton
136 E. Compton Blvd.   Compton


Fox Figueroa Theatre 
4011 S. Figueroa St.

Fox Florence Theatre 
1536 E. Florence Ave.

Fox Gentry see Gentry Theatre
6525 Compton Ave.

Fox Granada  see Granada Theatre 
107 N. Market St.

Fox Inglewood 
115 N. Market St. Inglewood

Fox Loyola  see Loyola Theatre 
8610 S. Sepulveda  Westchester

Fox Manchester see Manchester Theatre
322 W. Manchester Ave.

Fox Mesa  see Mesa Theatre 
5807 Crenshaw Blvd.

Fox Plaza see Plaza Theatre
12788 Hawthorne Blvd.  Hawthorne

Fox Tower Theatre see Tower Theatre
111 N. Long Beach Blvd.  Compton

Fox Western see Western Theatre
3930 S. Western Ave.

Fremont Theatre see Riviera Theatre
5002 W. Adams Blvd.

Garden Theatre see Allen Theatre
3809 Tweedy Blvd. South Gate

Gardena Cinema
14948 Crenshaw Blvd.  Gardena

Gem Theatre see Maynard Theatre
2488 W. Washington Blvd.

Gentry Theatre
6525 Compton Ave.

Glaum, Louise Playhouse see Union Theatre
1122 24th St.

Globe Theatre see Florence Mills Theatre
3511 S. Central Ave.

Globe #2 see Florence Mills Theatre
3511 S. Central Ave.

Granada Theatre 
107 N. Market St.

Holden Performing Arts Center see Rimpau Theatre
4720 W. Washington Blvd.

Holiday Theatre  see Nubel Theatre
16711 Bellflower Blvd.  Bellflower

Home Theatre see Arlin Theatre
2117 W. Jefferson Blvd.

Huntington Theatre
6044 Pacific Blvd. Huntington Park

Huntington Theatre see Warner Bros. Huntington Park 
6714 Pacific Blvd. Huntington Park

Huntington Park Theatre see Warner Bros. Huntington Park 
6714 Pacific Blvd. Huntington Park

Imperial Theatre
3180 W. Imperial Highway   Inglewood

Inglewood Theatre
115 N. La Brea Ave.  Inglewood

Inglewood Theatre, Fox  see Fox Inglewood 
115 N. Market St. Inglewood

Inner City Repertory  see Boulevard Theatre
1615 W. Washington Blvd.

Jefferson Theatre see Arlin Theatre
2117 W. Jefferson Blvd.

Kabuki Theatre see Bard's West Adams
4409 W. Adams Blvd. West Adams


Kokusai Theatre see Crenshaw Theatre
3020 Crenshaw Blvd.


La Tijera Theatre
6820 La Tijera Blvd. Westchester

La Tosca Theatre
2930 S. Vermont Ave.

Largo Theatre
1827 E. 103rd St.   Watts

LaSalle Theatre
1625 West Adams Blvd.  West Adams

LaSalle Theatre see Adams Theatre
1898 West Adams Blvd.  West Adams

Leimert Theatre see Leimert / Vision Theatre 
3341 W. 43rd Pl.  Leimert Park

Liberty 3 Cinemas see Alcazar Theatre
4426 Gage Ave., Bell


Lincoln Theatre 
2300 S. Central

Loew's Cine see Ritz Theatre
226 S. Market St. Inglewood

Los Angeles Civic Aditorium see Shrine Auditorium
665 W. Jefferson

L.A. Jazz Concert Theatre see Crenshaw Theatre
3020 Crenshaw Blvd.

Los Pinos Theatre see Vogue Theatre 
9325 Long Beach Blvd.  South Gate

Louise Glaum Playhouse see Union Theatre
1122 24th St.

Loyola Theatre 
8610 S. Sepulveda  Westchester

Luna Theatre
1752 W. Adams Blvd.

Luna Park Theatre see Chutes Theatre
Washington
Blvd. at S. Main St.

Lynwood Theatre 
Long Beach Blvd. and Elmwood Ave./Imperial Hwy.
Lynwood

Lynwood Theatre 
11606 Long Beach Blvd.  Lynwood


Lyric Theatre 
7208 Pacific Blvd. Huntington Park

Manchester Theatre
322 W. Manchester Ave.

Maybell Theatre see Alpha Theatre
4065 Gage Ave.  Bell

Maynard Theatre
2488 W. Washington Blvd.

Meralta Theatre
10912 Downey Ave. Downey

Mesa Theatre 
5807 Crenshaw Blvd.

Metro Theatre see Rimpau Theatre
4720 W. Washington Blvd.


Mills Theatre see Florence Mills Theatre
3511 S. Central Ave.

Mitchell Bros.  see United Artists
148 N. Market St. Inglewood

Morning Calm Theatre  see Gardena Cinema
14948 Crenshaw Blvd.  Gardena

Mystic Theatre
see Union Theatre
1122 24th St.

New Allen Theatre see Allen Theatre
3809 Tweedy Blvd. South Gate

New Arlington Theatre  see Arlington Theatre
2517 W. Washington Blvd.

Nubel Theatre
16711 Bellflower Blvd.  Bellflower

Pacific's Warner 2 see Warner Bros. Huntington Park 
6714 Pacific Blvd. Huntington Park

Palace Theatre see Arlin Theatre
2117 W. Jefferson Blvd.

Pan Andreas West see Balboa Theatre
8713 S. Vermont Ave.
9110 S. Sepulveda Blvd.

Park Theatre  see Gardena Cinema
14948 Crenshaw Blvd.  Gardena

Park Theatre
6504 Pacific Blvd.  Huntington Park

Photoplay see  La Tosca Theatre
2930 S. Vermont Ave.

Photoplay No. 2 see  La Tosca Theatre
2930 S. Vermont Ave.

Playhouse see Union Theatre
1122 24th St.


Plaza Theatre
12788 Hawthorne Blvd.  Hawthorne
6107 S. Main St.

Pussycat Theatre see Lyric Theatre 
7208 Pacific Blvd. Huntington Park

Pussycat Theatre see Ritz Theatre
226 S. Market St. Inglewood

Realart Theatre see Trojan Theatre
931 W. Jefferson Blvd.

Rimpau Theatre
4720 W. Washington Blvd.


Rio Theatre
11239 S. Western Ave.

Ritz Theatre
226 S. Market St. Inglewood


Riviera Theatre
5002 W. Adams Blvd.

Rosebud Theatre
1940 S. Central Ave.

Savoy Theatre
5326 S. Central Ave.

Shrine Auditorium
665 W. Jefferson

South Gate Theatre see Allen Theatre
3809 Tweedy Blvd. South Gate

Southside Theatre
11243 S. Vermont Ave.


Sunbeam Theatre
6525 Compton Ave.

Symphony Theatre
212 N. Tamarind Ave.  Compton

Teatro Los Pinos see Vogue Theatre 
9325 Long Beach Blvd.  South Gate

Teatro Variedades  see Gardena Cinema
14948 Crenshaw Blvd.  Gardena

Tower Theatre
111 N. Long Beach Blvd.  Compton

Trojan Theatre
931 W. Jefferson Blvd.

United Theatre see Maynard Theatre
2488 W. Washington Blvd.

United Arlington see Maynard Theatre
2488 W. Washington Blvd.


United Artists
148 N. Market St. Inglewood

Union Theatre
1122 24th St.

Union Square Theatre
see Union Theatre
1122 24th St.

University Theatre see Trojan Theatre
931 W. Jefferson Blvd.

Variedades  see Gardena Cinema
14948 Crenshaw Blvd.  Gardena

Variety Theatre
5253 W. Adams Blvd.

Velaslavasay Panorama  see Union Theatre
1122 24th St.

1718 S. Main St.

Victory Theatre see Avenue Theatre 
11022 Downey Ave., Downey


Vision Theatre see Leimert / Vision Theatre 
3341 W. 43rd Pl.  Leimert Park

Vogue Theatre 
9325 Long Beach Blvd.  South Gate

Warner Bros. Huntington Park 
6714 Pacific Blvd. Huntington Park

Warners see Warner Bros. Huntington Park 
6714 Pacific Blvd. Huntington Park


West, Apollo see Bard's West Adams
4409 W. Adams Blvd. West Adams

West Angeles Performing Arts Center see Crenshaw Theatre
3020 Crenshaw Blvd.

West Coast Balboa see Balboa Theatre
8713 S. Vermont Ave.

West Coast Boulevard Theatre  see Boulevard Theatre
1615 W. Washington Blvd.

West Coast Manchester see Manchester Theatre
322 W. Manchester Ave.


West Coast Mesa  see Mesa Theatre 
5807 Crenshaw Blvd.

Western Theatre
3930 S. Western Ave.






    a mystery theatre...   



A crowd enjoying the show in some theatre in
the South Central area in the 50s. Which one?
Unknown. Thanks to Ken McIntyre for the photo,
 a post of his on Photos of Los Angeles.
full size view | on PoLA




about photos from other
websites that appear on this page...


We've tried to give appropriate credit. Please
contact us if there are incorrect attributions, links that
no longer work or other issues. A link near each image will
direct you to a full size version on the website hosting it.
Assume that all the images are subject to copyright
restrictions. Contact the webmaster of the site in
question concerning reproduction or other use.


5th Avenue Theatre

2541 W.  Manchester Blvd.
  | map

Inglewood, CA 90305

Opened: 1939. The photo here is a 2012 look up the 5th's tower from Ken McIntyre. Click on it for a larger view.

The 5th Avenue was built for Southside Theatres and subsequently operated by Fox West Coast, National General and Mann Theatres. It later took a slip down and became a porno venue before closing.

Architect:
Clifford A. Balch    Seating: 986

Status: The theatre closed in the 80s and is currently sitting vacant. 

More information: See the page on the 5th Avenue.

Academy Theatre

3141 W. Manchester Blvd.   | map

Inglewood, CA 90305     

Opened:  November 7, 1939.

Seating: 1156

Architect: S. Charles Lee. The UCLA S. Charles Lee Archive notes that the inspiration for the tower was that of a spool of film unwinding.

There was talk of building this theatre so it would be suitable for holding the Oscar presentations but it was never used for that purpose. The theatre did host a few premieres and was a major suburban venue for its operator, Fox West Coast Theatres.

Status: It's been a church since 1976. The photo here is from 2010.

More Information: See our page on the Academy Theatre.

Adams Theatre

1898 W. Adams Blvd.


West Adams (Los Angeles),
CA 90018
  | map

Opened: 1914 as the La Salle Theatre. It was announced in the May 3, 1913 issue of Southwest Contractor & Manufacturer that plans were being prepared. Thanks to Joe Vogel for that find. It's in the 1914 city directory with an address of 1896 W. Adams. It's in the 1916 through 1919 and 1921 and 1923 directories as at 1898 W. Adams.

It became the Adams Theatre sometime prior to 1936. The photos are 2015 Google Maps views. The street view at top is looking looking west -- the theatre building is on the south side of the street. At right is a rear view. Click on them to enlarge or head to Google for the interactive version.

This building replaced an earlier LaSalle Theatre at 1625 W. Adams.

Seats: 496       Architect:  A.C. Martin



The front and back of a March 1938 "programette"
 for the Adams. Thanks to Sean Ault for finding
it and sending it our way.

full size view


The inside pages. Shows include "Love
and Hisses," "Rosalie" and "Tovarich."
full size view

Status: It ran until 1955 with a Mr. Stanley Steck operating it. He may have been running it since as early as 1928. There have been lots of additions and remodeling but at least some of the theatre building is still there as retail (an antique store) and storage.

More information: See the Cinema Treasures page on the Adams for some nice research by Joe Vogel. Ken McIntyre has a 2007 photo in one of his Photobucket albums. Also see our listing on this page for another Adams Theatre, Bard's West Adams, later known as the Fox Adams.

Alcazar Theatre

4426 Gage Ave.  | map

Bell, CA 90201

Opened:  In 1925 as the Alcazar Theatre. As the Alcazar it was a longtime Fox West Coast operation. Later it was known as the Bell Theatre. It got triplexed in the late 70s and was then known as the Liberty 3 Cinemas.

Architect: Julian.T. Zeller

Seating: Originally announced as 1,800. Later the count was 1,380.

Status: The building was demolished in the late 80s after sustaining damage in the 1978 Whittier Narrows earthquake.

More information: See our page on the Alcazar Theatre.

    Los Angeles Public Library   

www.lapl.org


A look at the Alcazar's auditorium in 1945
 after the redecorating following a fire.
full size view

Alpha Theatre

4065 Gage Ave.


Bell, CA 90201   | map

Opened: As the Maybell Theatre in 1922. It got the Alpha Theatre name with a major 1938 remodeling.

For decades this was a Fox West Coast operation. The circuit also had the nearby Alcazar. By 1975 the Alpha had closed with the space used for classes by the local parks & rec department. Catering hall use by several different owners followed.

Seats:  656        

Architects: Julian T. Zeller (1922), S. Charles Lee (1938). Zeller also designed the Alcazar Theatre in Bell.

Status: It's currently in use as a banquet hall, the Fiesta Mexicana. The photo is a 2015 Google view. click on it to enlarge or head to the interactive version.

More information: See the Cinema Treasures page on the Alpha. The Cinema Tour page has a 2004 exterior view.  American Classics has a 1983 photo.  Michelle Gerdes has several 2009 photos in her Theatres California album on Flickr.

    Los Angeles Public Library   

www.lapl.org


A look at the Alpha in 1938.

    Photos of Los Angeles    



A 2008 view by Ken McIntyre of the theatre in an
earlier banquet hall incarnation. Thanks, Ken!
Also on Photos of Los Angeles:
| as the "HALL" - 2002 | night view - 2013 |

Ken has some additional 2008 exterior photos on Photobucket.

Allen Theatre

3809 Tweedy Blvd.  | map

South Gate, CA 90280

Opened: 1924 as the Garden Theatre. It was later renamed the South Gate Theatre and, sometime after 1943, became the Allen Theatre. It was still running as a single screen movie house into the 80s and then became a venue for rock performances.

Architect: The original architects are unknown. Clarence G. Smale did a 1936 remodel.

Seating: 673              Status: Still there but closed since 2007.

More Information: See our page on the Allen Theatre.

    South Gate High    

A 1980 look at the Allen on the South Gate
High "Memories of the Allen Theatre" page.
full size view

Arcade Theatre

Queen St.   Inglewood, CA 90301  | map

Opened: Running in the 20s. Opening and closing dates are unknown. We don't have an address. Queen St. runs east and west one block north of Manchester. The map link gets you to a probable location for the theatre between La Brea and Market.

Status: It's been demolished.

More Information: Well, Cinema Treasures has a page on the Arcade, but there's really no data there.

    California State Dominguez Hills    

digitalcollections.archives.csudh.edu/cdm/


A postcard view down Queen St. toward the
 Arcade, half way down the block. Note the vertical
 saying "Theatre." Cal State dates the card, from the
James H. Osborne Photograph Collection, as 1921.
full size view | on the CSUDH site




A detail from the 1921 card, That must have
 been the snack wagon this side of the theatre.
 larger detail view

Arden Theatre

11709 Long Beach Blvd.

Lynwood, CA 90262   | map

Opened: 1942   Seats: 940          Architect: S. Charles Lee

Status: It's gone. It was on the west side of Long Beach Blvd. was just south of where the 105 now crosses. The theatre closed in 1974 and burned in 1988. There's now a used car lot on the site.

More Information: See the Cinema Treasures page on the Arden. Cinema Tour has a page with a small 1942 photo.

    UCLA S. Charles Lee Papers   

calisphere.org | digital2.library.ucla.edu

A 1942 construction photo taken by R.M. Decker.
A 1942 shot by Hoffman-Luckhaus. "In Old California"
with John Wayne was a May 1942 release. The co-feature,
"Topper Takes a Trip," dated from 1939. Note the parking
 lot entrance: driving under the marquee.
full size view



A night shot by Photo Enterprise. "The Verdict"
with Peter Lorre was a November 1946 release.
A lobby photo by Hoffman-Luckhaus.

Also in the UCLA collection:


    Ozfan22 on Flickr    

www.flickr.com/photos/ozfan22


An 80s view of the unused theatre from Ozfan 22.
full size view | on Flickr

Arlin Theatre

2117 W. Jefferson Blvd.


Los Angeles, CA 90018
| map

Opened: Around 1911 -- a Mr. T.A. Russell had a listing under theatres for this address in the 1911 city directory.  In 1912 and in the 1914 through 1918 city directories it's listed as the Columbia Theatre In a 1914 ad from Vokoban on Flickr-- it's listed as the Columbia Theatre at Jefferson and Arlington.

In 1919 it was the Jefferson Theatre. It's in a 1923 Paramount ad and in the 1922, 1923, 1926 and 1927 city directories as the Palace Theatre. In the 1929, 1932 and 1936 city directories it's listed as the Home Theatre. In 1937 it was renamed the Arlin Theatre -- the name coming from the location in the block just west of Arlington Blvd.

Seats: 480 at one time

Architect: Unknown

Status: It's now a pawnshop. The photo is a 2016 Google Maps image. Click on it to enlarge or head to Google for the interactive version.

More Information: See the Cinema Treasures page on the Arlin for some nice research by Joe Vogel. He notes that the city lists a 1930 construction date. Evidently there was either a major remodel or a replacement building was constructed at that time. Also thanks to Joe for finding the date of the name change from Home to Arlin.

The Cinema Tour page on the Arlin has four 2003 facade photos. Ken McIntyre has three 2007 facade views on Photos of Los Angeles.

Arlington Theatre

2517 W. Washington Blvd.
https://sites.google.com/site/lamoviepalaces/south/Arlington-Google-2011.jpg

(at Arlington)    
| map

Los Angeles, CA   90018

Opened:  1923, evidently as the New Arlington. This was a larger, more deluxe replacement for the older Arlington Theatre a block away and on the other side of the street. This new one is listed as the Arlington in the 1923 and 1929 city directories.

Seating:  792        Architect: Unknown

Status: The building is still there but remodeled beyond recognition. Closing date as a theatre is not known. The 2011 photo looking west at the remodeled facade is from Google Maps. Click on it to enlarge or head to the interactive view. A post on Noirish Los Angeles advises that the building was the Skatium from perhaps 1956 until 1980.

More information: The Cinema Treasures page on the Arlington has great research by Joe Vogel, Ken McIntyre and others. See our listing for the earlier Arlington at 2488 W. Washington Blvd, later called the Maynard Theatre.

    L.A. Public Library Collection   

www.lapl.org


A look west on Washington Blvd.
 at the Arlington Theatre.
full size view

Avenue Theatre

11022 Downey Ave.  | map

Downey, CA 90241

Opened: 1925 as the Downey Theatre. In the 40s it was called the Victory Theatre and in 1949 was renamed the Avenue Theatre.  The theatre had a full stage for live shows that originally accompanied the films.The stagehouse on the theatre has been removed. The Avenue slid toward second run status in the 70s. It closed in 2003.

Architect: Schilling and Schilling of Long Beach.     Seating: 850

Status: Sitting vacant with a nice mural on the entrance. It's owned by the City of Downey.

More Information:  See our page on the Avenue Theatre.

    Downey Historical Conservancy    

thedowneyconservancy.org | on Flickr | on Facebook



A 1939 view of the theatre, still called the Downey,
 from the Downey Historical Conservancy's collection.
full size view

Balboa Theatre

8713 S. Vermont Ave.
  | map

Los Angeles, CA 90044

Opened: 1926 as a West Coast Theatres house. We're a block and a half south of Manchester on the west side of Vermont. I has also been known as the West Coast Balboa and the Fox Balboa. The photo is a 2015 Google Maps view looking north on Vermont. Click on it to enlarge or head to Google for the interactive version.

Architect: L.A. Smith    Seating: 1,250

Status: It's still sitting there on a desolate stretch of Vermont looking abandoned. After closing as a film house it was a Nation of Islam mosque (until 2009) and then turned into a still active film production facility, the Pan Andreas West.

More Information: See our page on the Balboa Theatre.

    Los Angeles Public Library    

www.lapl.org


An undated Herald Examiner photo of the
 auditorium from the Library's collection.
 full size view

Baldwin Theatre

3741 S. La Brea Ave.    | map |

Baldwin Hills (Los Angeles) 90016

Opened: August 10, 1949. It was operated initially by Fanchon & Marco and later  by Statewide, Century, Loew's and General Cinema. In the 80s it was triplexed and operated by Inner City Cinemas, a local African-American owned chain.

Architect: Lewis Eugene Wilson designed the innovative structure supported by laminated wood arches.

Seating: 1,800 seats originally, 970 as a triplex.

Status: Closed as a theatre in 1994. The auditorium remains, converted to office space. The front has been demolished and replaced by a branch bank.

More Information: See the page on the Baldwin Theatre for lots of photos.

    Julius Schulman    

flickr.com/photos/srk1941/sets

A 1949 look at the Baldwin by Julius Schulman. The
photo is in a Baldwin Hills 1950s and 1977 set, one of
many architecture related sets posted on Flickr by
SRK1941. We're running "You're My Everything"
and "Mr. Soft Touch."
full size view

Bard's West Adams

https://sites.google.com/site/lamoviepalaces/adams/Adams-Google-141.jpg
4409 W. Adams Blvd. 
| map |  

Los Angeles, CA 90016

Opened:  1925 by Lou Bard as Bard's West Adams. It's also been known as Bard's Adams Street, Fox Adams, Bard's Theatre, Adams West, the Kabuki Theatre, the Apollo West and Bard's Apollo.  The photo is a 2014 Google Maps view. Click on it to enlarge or head to the interactive version.

Seating:  Perhaps 1,325 originally -- 1,100 later. There was no balcony.

Architect: Lewis A. Smith. Inside it was the favorite Bard theme, Egyptian. The facade, lobby and restrooms had received a serious modernizing in the 30s or 40s -- it used to be more exotic. The auditorium evidently was quite intact until the 1990s.

Status: Now a church.

More information:  See our page on Bard's West Adams.  Also see our listing on this page for the other Adams Theatre at 1898 W. Adams.

Boulevard Theatre

1615 W. Washington Blvd.    | map

Los Angeles, CA   90007

Opened: May 27, 1925. The opening film was Joe Weber & Lew Fields in "Friendly Enemies."  On the great stage was "Sally," a Fanchon and Marco Idea. The sign on the side said West Coast Boulevard Theatre.

Fox sold the building and adjacent parking lot to the Thriftimart corporation in 1960. 
The theatre closed for movies in 1964. In 1966 it was converted to a community center with the theatre's last use by a legit group called Inner City Repertory

Architect:  Albert C. Martin

Seating: Estimates vary from 2,160 to 2,300.

Status: Demolished in the mid 80s. After the cultural center ceased using the space, the the auditorium was used for storage.

More information: See our page on the Boulevard Theatre.

    L.A. Public Library Collection   

www.lapl.org


A detail of the Boulevard's proscenium in 1927.
full size view

California Theatre

6528 Pacific Blvd.    | map

Huntington Park, CA 90255

Opened: 1925 and was operated for decades by Fox Theatres as the Fox California Theatre.

The theatre was triplexed in the 80s and known then as the California 3 Theatres.

Architects: Arthur George Lindley and Charles R. Selkirk, who also did the Alex Theatre in Glendale.

Seating: 1500

Status: Closed in 2006.  In 2007 the main floor was converted to retail space. The 2 balcony theatres are still intact but unused.

More Information: See our page on the California Theatre.

Carlton Theatre

5409 S. Western Ave.  | map

Los Angeles, CA 90220

Opened:  1924 or perhaps earlier.  In mid-1924 it was running as a West Coast Theatres operation. This Chesterfield Square neighborhood location was about 4 blocks north of Slauson Ave.

Seats: 1,192          Architect: Unknown

Status:  It's been demolished. The theatre closed in the 50s and was being used as a church in 1958.  Demolition date is unknown but it was gone by 1972.

More Information:  Check out the Cinema Treasures page on the Carlton.

    Los Angeles Public Library    

www.lapl.org


A 60s look at the facade of the Carlton
Theatre from the LAPL collection.
A sidewall shot.
full size view

Castle Theatre

8518 S. San Pedro St.


Los Angeles, CA 90003 
| map

Opened: This Florence area house opened in 1924, just north of Manchester.  Joe Vogel on Cinema Treasures notes that it was built by a Mr. U.G. Hubbs and initially operated by him as well.  The photo is a 2015 Google view. On the right is Manchester, heading east. Click on it to enlarge or head to Google for the interactive version.

Seats:  575                   Architect: Unknown    

Status: It closed around 1954. It's now a church.

More Information: See the Cinema Treasures page on the Castle.

    George Mann Collection    



A 1926 photo of the Castle by George Mann of the
comedy dance team Barto and Mann from
Brad Smith's
 Theatre Marquees set.
Presumably that's Mr. Barto in front 

full size view | on Flickr

Chutes Theatre

Washington Blvd. at S. Main St.   | map

Los Angeles, CA   90015

Opened:  1900 as the Chutes Theatre, later known as the Luna Park Theatre, for a time under the management of Arthur Hyman.

Seating: 1400    Status: Demolished.  The amusement park closed in 1914.

More Information: See our page on the Chutes Theatre.

    California State Library   

www.library.ca.gov



A c. 1900 postcard from the Library's collection.
full size view | data page

Congress Theatre

7506 S. Vermont Ave.


Los Angeles, CA 90044 
| map

Opened: 1939. It's also been listed with an address of 7510 S. Vermont.  We're three blocks south of Florence Blvd. and three blocks west of the 110. 

The photo is a 2015 Google Maps view looking north on scenic Vermont Ave. Click on it to enlarge or head to Google for the interactive version.

Seats: 869      Architect:  Clarence J. Smale

Status: It closed in the early 50s. It's now a church

More information: See the Cinema Treasures page on the Congress. The Cinema Tour page has three 2007 exterior views.  There are several recent facade views on the Roadside Architecture site's Los angeles Theatres page 3.  Steve Milner has a 2015 facade shot on the SoCal historic Architecture Facebook page.

    Don Solosan for the L.A. Conservancy    

www.laconservancy.org | on Facebook


A 2009 facade view by Don Solosan -- part of a survey to
 determine the condition of existing L.A. theatre buildings.
full size view



A look north at the theatre.
A detail of the tower.
The entrance terrazzo in 2009.
 It's a Don Solosan photo.

Thanks, Don! And thanks also to Hillsman Wright
of the LAHTF for sending the photos our way.


Crenshaw Theatre

3020 Crenshaw Blvd.


Los Angeles, CA 90016

| map

Opened: In 1942 as an independent neighborhood house. It's on the west side of the street a block north of Jefferson.

After giving up on Hollywood product in the late 50s, the theatre became a jazz club, the L.A. Jazz Concert Theatre. Later it was the Kokusai, an outlet for Japanese films. The photo is a 2015 view from Google Maps. Click on it to enlarge or head to the interactive version.

Seats:  800           Architect: Paul Laszlo

Status:  It was running as the Kokusai into the late 80s. It's now owned by a church and called the West Angeles Performing Arts Center.

More Information:  See our page on the Crenshaw Theatre.

   Julius Shulman - Getty Research Institute   

| getty.edu/research/institute | Shulman photos |


A lovely 1942 Julius Schulman photo
 of the theatre's entrance.
 full size view |
on the Getty site

Florence Mills Theatre

3511 S. Central Ave. 

Los Angeles, CA 90011  | map

Opened: 1912 as the Globe Theatre. Also known as Globe #2, it was a project of the short-lived Globe Amusement Co. It was on the block south of Jefferson and north of MLK Blvd. (formerly known as Santa Barbara Ave.).

It's in the 1913, 1914 and 1916 city directories as the Globe. In the 1915 directory it's listed as being operated by an "A P Tukwell." In the 1918, 1921, 1922 and 1923 directories the address shows up as 3513 S. Central. "C W Young" gets a listing in 1922 as the operator.  We get a name change with the 1923 listing, it's become the Amusu Theatre.

Sometime prior to 1950 it was renamed the Florence Mills Theatre, named after the famed black theatre and singing star of the 1910s and 20s.  Sometimes it was just listed as the Mills Theatre.

Architect: Arthur Lawrence Valk. Thanks to Joe Vogel on Cinema Treasures for that find. He notes that the April 1912 issue of Moving Picture World said that Valk had designed the new theatre for John Wagner.

Seating: 740

Status:  After closing as a theatre, the lobby became a video store before the building was abandoned. It was demolished in 2013.  There was supposed to be redevelopment with a cultural center and housing on the site -- this didn't happen. The site is a vacant lot.

More Information:  See the Cinema Treasures page on the Florence Mills.  There's a
1950 ad for the theatre with our listing for the Rosebud Theatre.

     Cinema Treasures    

http://cinematreasures.org/theaters/2388

A 2013 view looking north on
Central after demolition has begun.
full size view | on Cinema Treasures

A look around the back during demolition. Thanks to
Cinema Treasures contributor Homeboy for these two photos.
full size view | on Cinema Treasures

See the photos section of the Cinema Treasures page on
the Florence Mills for six more demolition photos by Homeboy.

     Florence Mills    

www.florencemills.com


A pre-demo look at the Florence Mills Theatre.

Florencita Theatre

1830 E. Florence Ave.  | map

Los Angeles, CA 90001

Opened: 1927 or earlier.  The Florence-Graham area house got an organ installation in 1927 and was in the 1929 city directory.  It was on the south side of the street at Walnut Dr. -- that's between Compton Ave. and S. Alameda St. It was only 3 blocks from the Fox Florence.

Seating: 575

Status: It was running at least into 1952.  It's been demolished.  There's now a car wash on the site.

More Information:  There isn't much. See the Cinema Treasures page on the Florencita for a few tidbits.

   Julius Shulman - Getty Research Institute    

 | getty.edu/research/institute | Shulman photos |


A detail from a 1952 look west by Julius Shulman. Thanks to
Hoss C on Noirish Los Angeles for finding the photo in the Getty
collection. It's featured on his post #30563. Shulman's job
#1532 was shooting the nearby Bank of America branch.

Fox Compton

136 E. Compton Blvd.  | map

Compton, CA 90220

Opened: Sometime before 1940 -- maybe in the 20s. It was just the Compton before it became the Fox Compton

Closed: Perhaps the late 50s.  Business plummeted with white flight to the suburbs.

Seating: 618       Architect: Unknown

Status: It's been demolished, along with almost every other vintage building in downtown Compton. The site is now part of a parking lot for a huge strip mall.The town has no movie theatres.

More Information:  See our page on the Fox Compton.

    DLZ127 on Flickr   


Thanks to Nathan / DLZ127 for
this view of the abandoned theatre.

Fox Figueroa Theatre

4011 S. Figueroa St.    | map

Los Angeles, CA   90037

Opened: 1925 as the Figueroa Theatre.  It was operated by Fox West Coast for years and known then as the Fox Figueroa.  The building was on the corner of S. Figueroa and Santa Barbara Ave. (now Martin Luther King Blvd).

Architect:  William Sterling Hebbard, a San Diego architect.

Seating: 1470

Status: Demolished in the 60s. The site now has a branch bank on the corner.

More information: See the Fox Figueroa page for more photos and information.

    L.A. Public Library Collection   

www.lapl.org


The auditorium of the Fox Figueroa in 1945. 
full size view

Fox Florence Theatre

1536 E. Florence Ave.    | map |

Los Angeles, CA  90001

Opened: April 8, 1932 with Leo Carrillo and Lupe Valez staring in "The Broken Wing". It was built for Fox West Coast Theatres.

Architect: Designed by S. Charles Lee, L.A.'s most prolific theatre architect.
Cinema Treasures has a list of 76 other theatres they index that were designed by Mr. Lee. 

Seating:
1707

Status: The theatre closed in 1965 and was demolished in 1968.

More Information: See our page on the Fox Florence Theatre.

    California State Library   

www.library.ca.gov



A c.1933 Mott Studios photo of the

Fox Florence Theatre. 
full size view

Fox Inglewood Theatre

115 N. Market St.    | map |

Inglewood, CA 90301   

Opened: March 31, 1949

Architects: S. Charles Lee and Carl G. Moeller designed the building for Fox West Coast using elements out of Fox's standard "Skouras style" sourcebook.

Seating: 1166

Status: It's been closed since 1984 and is a curious well preserved time capsule. The present owner is trying to sell the building for the best offer he can get above $200,000.   The theatre was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 2013. The photo is a 2010 view.

More Information: See our page on the Fox Inglewood Theatre.

Gardena Cinema

14948 Crenshaw Blvd.
  
| map |

Gardena, CA 90249 

(310) 217-0505 
www.gardenacinema.com

Opened: 1947. At some point is was called the Morning Calm Theatre. In the early 60s as the Park Theatre it was run by Harry Milstein's Grand Theatres as a second run house like their Grand and Stadium theatres in Torrance. Pacific Theatres was later involved. Sometimes it ran Spanish language films as well as occasional Korean and Japanese films.

In the late 70s and into the mid- 80s it was the Teatro Variedades with Mexican films and the occasional live variety show. The photo is a 2015 Google Maps view looking south on Crenshaw. Click on it to enlarge or head to Google for the current interactive version.

Seats: 800           Architect: Unknown

Status: In 1995 the same owners who had owned it since the 70s turned it into the Gardena Cinema, running as an independent single screen house with first run films.

More information: Check out the Cinema Treasures page on the Gardena Cinema. They also have a page for a Gardena Theatre on W. Gardena Blvd. that closed in the 50s.

The Cinema Tour page has several 2003 exterior views. There's a nice minute and a half video tour (even going to the booth) on YouTube, dating from 2012 when the venue was for sale. American Classic Images has a 1983 view of the venue as the Teatro Variedades.

    Cinema Treasures   

http://cinematreasures.org/theaters/2249



Thanks to Cinema Treasures contributor
Granola for this photo of the Gardena's lobby.

full size view | on Cinema Treasures



A look to the rear of the house from Granola.
Note the cry rooms adjacent to the booth.
full size view | on Cinema Treasures



The screen end of the auditorium.
Thanks again to Granola for the photo.
full size view | on Cinema Treasures

    Ken McIntyre on Photobucket   

s132.photobucket.com/user/kencmcintyre/library



A 2008 entrance view. Thanks to Ken McIntyre

for his photo. Head to this one in his Photobucket album
and you can page ahead for two more.

full size view | on Photobucket

Ken also has a 2011 night view on Photos of Los Angeles.

Gentry Theatre

6525 Compton Ave. 

Los Angeles, CA 90001

| map

Opened: 1937 on the site of the Sunbeam Theatre, which had burned in 1931. The location, in the Florence area, is on the west side of Compton Ave. at 66th St, 3 blocks south of Gage Ave.  The photo looking south on Compton Ave. is a 2015 Google Maps view. Click on it to enlarge or head to their interactive version.

Seats: 1,296 originally -- later down to 1,021      

Architect:  S. Charles Lee. See the posts on our LA Theatres Blogspot page for a few others by Mr. Lee.

Status: It's currently vacant and for lease.

More Information:  See the Cinema Treasures page on the Gentry. Photos of Los Angeles has a 2011 street view by Ken McIntyre. Mr. Ethereal Reality's Noirish Los Angeles post #6425 has some nice terrazzo shots.

    Cinema Tour   

A vintage lobby view from the Theatre Catalog of 1949-50. 
At least that's the date we get on the Cinema Tour page.


    Theatres in Los Angeles   

by Suzanne Tarbell Cooper,
Amy Ronnebeck Hall and Marc Wanamaker.
Arcadia Publishing, 2008.
arcadia publishing |
google books preview


This 1938 photo of the Gentry appears on
page 118 of the Arcadia Publishing book "Theatres
in Los Angeles." Most of the photos in the book
are from Mr. Wanamaker's Bison Archives.

Granada Theatre

107 N. Market St.   | map

Inglewood, CA   90301

Opened:  1924. It burned in 1945 and was replaced by the Fox InglewoodOperated by Fox West Coast, it was also known as the Fox Granada.

Seating: 1,000  

Architect: Leonard L. Jones designed the building for Arthur Bennett.

More Information: See the Cinema Treasures page on the Granada for a few stories about the building. Our listing for the Granada Theatre on Temple lists other theatres of the same name in the area.

    Cinema Treasures   

cinematreasures.org/theaters/2400



A 1945 look at the Granada added to the Cinema
Treasures Granada page by Bill Gabel. "Penthouse
Rhythm" was a June 1945 Universal release.
full size view | on Cinema Treasures

    L.A. Public Library Collection   

www.lapl.org



A November 10, 1925 view looking north on
Market Street along the interurban tracks.
The Granada is over on the left.
full size view




A c.1930 look at the entrance of the Granada before
 the new marquee and the stucco job on the facade.
The Library has this one dated as 1938 but "East
is West" was released in October 1930.
full size view | on FB/LATheatres

    Moviemice   

www.moviemice.com


Thanks to John at Moviemice (a site about all things Western
Electric) we have this lovely late 20s or early 30s view of the Granada
booth showing off their equipment. They have both soundheads for sound-
on-film as well as separate turntables for Vitaphone disc reproduction.
Note the long row of dimmer handles high up on the
 front wall. Thanks to Kurt Wahlner for finding this one!

    Theatres in Los Angeles   

by Suzanne Tarbell Cooper,
Amy Ronnebeck Hall and Marc Wanamaker.
Arcadia Publishing, 2008.
arcadia publishing | google books preview


This 1942 photo on page 37 of the Arcadia Publishing book
 "Theatres in Los Angeles" identified as the Granada on Temple
St. is actually the Granada in Inglewood. Most of the photos in
the book are from Mr. Wanamaker's Bison Archives.

Ken McIntyre has a full size view on Photos of Los Angeles
and it's on our Los Angeles Theatres Facebook page as well.

Huntington Theatre

6044 Pacific Blvd.

Huntington Park, CA 90255   | map

Opened:  1920 or 1921 -- and evidently was running into the early 50s. One source notes that in the 40s it was part of the Warner Bros. circuit.  It was still listed in the city directory as late as 1946. There seem to be no photos.

Seats:  650    

Architect:  Edward J. Borgmeyer, also the designer of the Forum Theatre on Pico.

Status: It's gone. The site, on the east side of the street between Randolph and Belgrave, has been redeveloped.

More information: There's not much. The Cinema Treasures page on the Huntington has a few tidbits unearthed by the ever-amazing Joe Vogel.

Imperial Theatre

3180 W. Imperial Highway  | map

Inglewood, CA 90303

Opened: 1949 or 1950. Plans were announced in the July 31, 1948 issue of Boxoffice. The theatre was on the south side of Imperial about a block west of Crenshaw.  At some point in the 50s it was taken over by Phil Isley who evidently didn't do well with it. He also had the La Tijera, which did even worse. In the 60s it was operated by Statewide Theatres, then Century Theatres (not the Syufy chain), Loew's, then General Cinema.

Seats: 800      Architects:  George Vernon Russell; Eduardo J Samaniego

Closing: Sometime in the early 80s. Demolished in 2006. The property has been redeveloped with a Burlington Coat Factory and other tenants on the site.

More Information:  See the Cinema Treasures page on the Imperial where Joe Vogel has done some interesting research on the theatre's architectural team. American Classic Images has a 1984 shot of the closed theatre.

    Photos of Los Angeles    


Thanks to Ken McIntyre for this pre-2006 look
 at the once-luxurious abandoned theatre.
full size view

Also on Photos of LA from Ken McIntyre:

 | another abandoned view |

Inglewood Theatre

115 N. La Brea Ave.  | map |

Inglewood, CA 90301

Opened: 1923. The location is a block west of Market St. and a block and a half south of Florence Ave.  Prior to 1935 this address had been called 103 N. Commercial. In the 1938, 1940 and 1942 city directories it's given an address of 103 N. La Brea. Just a block over on Market were the Fox Inglewood and the United Artists. The theatre was run by Fox West Coast and, at the end, by its successor company National General.    

Architect: Boller Bros. See our Los Angeles Theatres Blogspot posts for more by the Boller Brothers.

Seats: 640    Closing: 1969 -- and demolished the same year. It's a parking lot.

More Information:  See the Cinema Treasures page on the Inglewood.  The theatre appears on the far right in a c.1950 Inglewood Public Library photo.

    Sean Ault Collection   



Thanks to Sean Ault for this 50s (60s?)
view -- our only color photo of the theatre.
full size view

    Cal State Dominguez Hills   

digitalcollections.archives.csudh.edu/cdm



A postcard of the theatre in the CSUDH collection.

    Theatres in Los Angeles   

by Suzanne Tarbell Cooper,
Amy Ronnebeck Hall and Marc Wanamaker.
Arcadia Publishing, 2008.
arcadia publishing | google books preview


A 1944 photo of the Inglewood appearing
on page 115 of "Theatres In Los Angeles."
full size view | on Google Books

    L.A. Public Library Collection   

www.lapl.org


A 1923 look at the newly opened theatre with a nice view
of the stagehouse. We got Frank Mayo in "Afraid To Fight,"
 a July 1922 release, along with a vaudeville show.
full size view

LaSalle Theatre

1625 W. Adams Blvd.

West Adams (Los Angeles), CA 90007  | map |

Opened: This first (of two) theatres called LaSalle was running in 1914. It was on the north side of the street about two blocks east of Normandie.  Opening date is unknown. Perhaps this was just a temporary storefront location until the real theatre got built. This one with the 1625 address doesn't show up in any city directory.

Later in 1914 it was replaced by a newer theatre, also called the LaSalle, at 1898 W. Adams. That's on the south side of the street about 5 1/2 blocks west -- and actually near LaSalle Ave. That one was later renamed the Adams Theatre.

    Jeff Bridges on Flickr   

www.flickr.com/photos/vokoban/


A March 13, 1914 ad for the LaSalle and
many other theatres. Thanks, Jeff!
full ad | on Flickr


La Tijera Theatre

https://sites.google.com/site/lamoviepalaces/la-tijera/LaTijera-TheatreCatalog.jpg
6820 La Tijera Blvd.
  | map

Westchester (Los Angeles), CA 90045

Opened: January 12, 1949. It was an independent venue owned by the Mo-Kan Theatre Co. The poor La Tijera was doomed. It ran only for about four years and was then converted into a bowling alley. The photo is from the 1949-50 issue of Theatre Catalog. Click on it for a larger view.

Architect: S. Charles Lee.  Seating: 1,530

Status: The building was gutted in the early 1980s for use as office space.

More information: See our page on the La Tijera Theatre.

La Tosca Theatre

2930 S. Vermont Ave. 
| map


Los Angeles, CA   90007

Opened: In 1912 as the Photoplay. It was also known as the Photoplay No. 2.

From 1919 onward it was the La Tosca Theatre. The interior decor featured Venetian murals.

By the middle of the 50s the theatre was a thriving foreign film house running German,  Hungarian, Italian and Indian films. The location close to USC helped it survive into the 80s even as the neighborhood went into a serious decline.

Seating: 640

Status: The closing date is not known -- perhaps the mid to late 80s. The building is currently used as retail, storage and a barber shop.  The photo here, by Bill Counter, is from 2012. Click on it to enlarge.

More Information: See the page on the La Tosca Theatre.

Largo Theatre

1827 E. 103rd St.

Watts (Los Angeles), CA 90002   | map

Opened: 1923     Seats: 904    

Architect: Carl Boller, Boller Brothers. See our blogspot post on the Boller Brothers for a list of a few more by the firm.

Status: Closing date is unknown but it ran at least through December 1960 as seen in the photos below. It appears to have been a Fox West Coast operation judging by the look of the boxoffice. The building, on the north side of the street just west of Wilmington Ave., has been demolished. There's a community center on the site.  The location is about 6 blocks north of the Watts Towers.

More information: Well, there's not much more out there. Cinema Treasures has a page on the theatre with a few comments.

    L.A. Public Library Collection   

www.lapl.org



Lining up for a film in 1960. It's a photo by Harry
Adams from the collection of Miriam Matthews.
 full size view





A look west on 103rd toward the Largo.
It's a photo by Harry Adams from the
collection of Miriam Matthews.

full size view

    USC Archives  

digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm


A closer look at the Largo's facade. It's a
detail from USC's version of the Abrams LAPL
photo above. On the USC site we can zoom in.
larger detail view |
on the USC site

Leimert / Vision Theatre

3341 W. 43rd Pl.    | map |

Los Angeles, CA 90008 

Opened: 1932

Architect: Stiles O. Clements of Morgan, Walls & Clements designed the building in an art deco style. The photo is a 2010 shot by Bill Counter.

Seating:
1,155 originally (later down to 1,050), all on one level.

Status: Closed as a movie theatre in 1968. It then had a run as a Jehovah's Witness chapel. It was purchased by actress Marla Gibbs in 1990 and renamed the Vision Theatre.

The theatre is used for occasional live performances. It has been owned by the City of Los Angeles Department of Cultural Affairs since 1999. Funding has been sporadic for the full renovation but the process continues in stages.

More Information: See our page on the Leimert/Vision Theatre.

Lincoln Theatre

2300 S. Central Ave.   | map |  

Los Angeles, CA  90011 

Opened: October 7, 1927.  The opening picture was First National's "Rose of the Golden West" with Mary Astor. 

This was the showplace of  South Central that hosted all the big black touring acts and was famous for its weekly talent shows. 

Architect: John Paxton Perrine designed the building for Adolph Ramish.

Seating: 1960

Status: It's been a church since 1962. The photo here is from 2010.

More Information: See our Lincoln Theatre page. 

Loyola Theatre



8610 S. Sepulveda Blvd.   | map

Westchester (Los Angeles), CA   90045

Opened: October 3, 1946 as a Fox West Coast project.  It was later operated by Fox's successor companies National General and Mann Theatres.

Architect:  Clarence J. Smale designed the Skouras-style building. Carl G. Moeller was the designer of the interior. 

Seating: 1,234

Status: The Loyola closed in 1982 with its final chapter as a revival house. The interior has been gutted to serve as a medical office building.  The photo is a 2010 view by Bill Counter. Click on it to enlarge.

More information: See the page on the Loyola Theatre.

Luna Theatre

1752 W. Adams Blvd.
 

Los Angeles, CA 90018
| map

Opened: All that is known so far is that the Luna was in the 1914 city directory.  The location at Adams and Brighton Ave. is a block and a half west of Normandie Ave. This fuzzy photo of the building that housed the Luna is a 2007 Google Maps view. It's had an unappealing stucco job since then. The theatre entrance was at the far end of the building. On the right, we're looking west on Adams. Click on the photo for a larger view -- or head to Google for the current interactive version.

A 2016 Google look at the back side of the theatre. Click on it for a larger view.

Status: Remodeled. The City of Los Angeles Department of Planning's records note that the theatre building at 1748-50-52 W. Adams dates from 1914.

More Information:  Well, there isn't any yet. 

This third photo is a 2016 Google aerial view. Note the theatre, now with skylights punched into its roof, sticking out beyond the rest of the building.

That's Brighton Ave. at the right. You can click on the photo for a larger view.

Lynwood Theatre

Well, there were two of them. #1:
Long Beach Blvd. at Elmwood Ave.  | map

Lynwood, CA 90262

Opened: 1925. Elmwood has gone missing and has evidently been absorbed into Imperial Highway. The house was a project of Mattie B. Vilven -- she and her husband Richard were local real estate agents. Initially it featured a female orchestra and an all-woman house staff.

Seating: 1,000   Status: Demolished in the 1933 earthquake.

More Information: See our page on the two Lynwood Theatres.

    Los Angeles Public Library    

www.lapl.org



A C.C. Pierce photo of the side of the first
Lynwood Theatre after the 1933 earthquake.
full size view

The replacement, on a different site a few blocks farther south:
11606 Long Beach Blvd.  | map

Lynwood, CA 90262

Opened: 1934, a project of the newly formed Lynwood Theatre Corporation. It was leased to W. J. Zimmerman. This site was just south of where the 105 now is.

Architect: Paul  Kerr    Seats: 715

Status: It's been demolished. Closing date is is unknown -- it became a bowling alley.  No photos of this second Lynwood Theatre have surfaced yet.

Lyric Theatre

7208 Pacific Blvd.    | map

Huntington Park, CA 90255

Opened: In the 20s at the corner of Florence and Pacific in the Walnut Park business district.  The photo here is a 2010 view by Lanna Pian.

Initially a vaudeville theatre, the Lyric eventually went to movies only and was for years under Fox Theatres management as the Fox Lyric. By the late 50s it was already showing softcore exploitation films. When it closed it was a Pussycat Theatre.

Architect: A.H. McCulloh of Walnut Park

Seating: 968

Status: The building still exists. It's unknown what use is currently being made of the auditorium space but there's retail in the lobby.

More Information: See our Lyric Theatre page.

Manchester Theatre

322 W.  Manchester Ave.  | map |  

Los Angeles, CA 90003

Opened: January 30, 1926 with "Bluebeard's Seven Wives." Theda Bara was at the opening.

Seating: 1,668

Architect: L.A. Smith, who did many other similar projects for West Coast Theatres. This one was reported to have an East Indian style interior. 

It was advertised as the West Coast Manchester and after the circuit became Fox West Coast around 1929, as the Fox Manchester Theatre. It was a major neighborhood house for the Fox circuit and was a tryout house for new Fanchon & Marco "Idea" prologues before they moved downtown to Loew's State.

Later as an independent, it was just known as the Manchester Theatre. At the end it got a reputation for being run-down and running marginal product.

Status: Closed in the early 70s -- it's been demolished. "Theatres in Los Angeles" notes that the Wurlitzer was donated to Loyola Marymount University in 1974.

More Information: See our page on the Manchester Theatre.

    Theatres in Los Angeles   

by Suzanne Tarbell Cooper,
Amy Ronnebeck Hall and Marc Wanamaker.
Arcadia Publishing, 2008.
arcadia publishing | google books preview


This 1944 photo of the Manchester appears on
page 114 of the Arcadia Publishing book "Theatres
in Los Angeles." Most of the photos in the book
are from Mr. Wanamaker's Bison Archives.

Maynard Theatre

2488 W. Washington Blvd. (at Arlington)  | map

Los Angeles, CA   90018

Opened:  1914 or earlier. It's in the 1914 through 1922 city directories as the Arlington. The Arlington Theatre name was moved to a newer, larger theatre at 2517 W. Washington Blvd. that opened in 1923 and this one became the United.

In the 1923 directory it's listed as the United Theatre and as the United Arlington in a 1925 L.A. Times ad. According to research by Ken McIntyre, United at the time also had the Anaheim, Eagle Rock, Colonial (at 5421 S. Vermont) and the Strand on Catalina Island,  In the 1929 city directory it's listed as the Gem.

Seating:  567                Architect: Unknown

Status: Demolished.  It was running as late as 1958, perhaps on and off. Joe Vogel found an item in the Boxoffice issue of May 6, 1950 reporting that Joe Vinnicof had closed the theatre at that time due to poor business.

More Information: See the Cinema Treasures page on the Maynard for fine research by Joe Vogel, Ken McIntyre and other contributors. This theatre, as the Arlington, is listed in a 1914 ad in the Jeff Bridges collection on Flickr. Also see our listing for the later Arlington Theatre at 2517 W. Washington Blvd.

    Sean Ault Collection   



A fine 50s view looking east on Washington Blvd. from
the Sean Ault Collection. It's 1956 if that's the Russian film
 "The Grasshopper" that they're advertising. Or it might
 be 1958 with another "The Grasshopper," a film also
known as "The True Story of Lynn Stuart."
A detail of the facade from Sean's photo.
Also from Sean's collection:

    L.A. Public Library Collection   

www.lapl.org


A look at the theatre in its United days from
 the Security Pacific National Bank collection.
full size view

Meralta Theatre

10912 Downey Ave.  | map

Downey, CA 90241 

Opened: 1924 The theatre  was the class place to go for those living in Paramount, Norwalk, Lakewood or Downey.  It was initially operated by Pearl Merrill and Laura Peralta, who each gave a syllable of their last name to the venue. They also operated two other Meralta theatres: the Culver City Meralta and the East L.A. Meralta.

Seating: 853.

Architect: Evan Jones. It got remodels in 1947 and 1961 by Clarence Smale.

Status: Closed in the 70s and demolished in 1978. It's now a parking lot.

More information: See our page on the Meralta Theatre.

    Downey Historical Conservancy    



A 1929 photo of the Meralta from the
collection of the Downey Conservancy.

Mesa Theatre

5807 Crenshaw Blvd.    | map

Los Angeles, CA   90043

Opened: April 1,1926 in the Hyde Park / Angeles Mesa area. It was constructed for West Coast Theatres which later morphed into Fox West Coast. It's also been known as the West Coast Mesa and Fox Mesa

Architect:  Lewis A. Smith

Seating:  1,442

Status: The Fox Mesa closed in September, 1963. It had a fire in April, 1964 and was demolished in 1965.  There's now a gas station and a KFC on the site.

More information: See the page on the Mesa Theatre.

    L.A. Public Library Collection   

www.lapl.org


A 1937 view of the West Coast Mesa
from the Library's collection.
full size view


Nubel Theatre

16711 Bellflower Blvd.
  | map

Bellflower, CA 91203

Opened: 1929 as the Bellflower Theatre. After a big facade remodel it reopened as the Nubel in 1949. In 1973 it got new owners and reopened as the Holiday Theatre.

The photo is a 50s postcard -- click on it for a larger view.

Seating: 960 originally, 1,150 after the 1948-49 remodel.

Architect: unknown

Status: It closed in 1977 and is now a church.

More information: See our page on the Nubell Theatre.

Paradise Theatre

9110 S. Sepulveda Blvd.

| map

Westchester (Los Angeles), CA 90045

Opened: 1950

The initial operator was Fanchon & Marco's Southside Theatres.  The 2013 photo of the re-purposed building is by Bill Counter. Click on it for a larger view.

Seating: 1,314 -- all on a single level

Architects: Arthur Froelich and Ted Rogvoy

Status: The building still stands but it was gutted in 1978 for office use. It's now sort of a two story mini-mall inside the auditorium.

More Information:  See our page on the Paradise Theatre.

     Boxoffice    

pro.boxoffice.com/the_vault



A look toward the screen from the cover
of the September 2, 1950 issue of Boxoffice.
full size view | whole page

Park Theatre

6504 Pacific Blvd.


Huntington Park, CA 90255   | map |

Opened: In the 20s (or earlier?) and ran into the mid-80s. At which point Metropolitan Theatres demolished it and replaced it with a new twin with one auditorium upstairs and one down. The photo is a 2007 view -- click on it to enlarge.

Seats: 850 currently as a twin.     Architects: Unknown

Status: Open as a first run house.

More information:  See the Cinema Treasures page for the original Park Theatre. They have a separate page for the 80s vintage Park Theatres twin.  The Cinema Tour page on the Park features 41 photos of the current theatres.

    American Classic Images    

A 1983 look at the original Park Theatre.
full size view | on the AC site

    L.A. Public Library Collection   

www.lapl.org



A perhaps 30s photo looking north on Pacific toward
Gage Ave. The original Park Theatre is in the middle of
 the block. Thanks to Joe Vogel on Cinema Treasures
 for finding the shot in the LAPL collection.
full size view


Plaza Theatre

12788 Hawthorne Blvd.  | map

Hawthorne, CA 90250

Opened: November 28, 1927 at the intersection of Hawthorne Blvd. and El Segundo Blvd. It was also known for awhile as the Fox Plaza.

Architect: J.J. Frankenfelder, according to one source.    Seats: 891

Status: The Plaza closed in 1964 and was demolished in 1971 for mall construction.

More Information: See our page on the Plaza Theatre for more photos.

    Los Angeles Public Library    

www.lapl.org


The theatre in 1927. Note
the "Grand Opening" banner.
full size view

Princess Theatre

6107 S. Main St.

Los Angeles, CA 90003   | map |

Opened: 1925. Joe Vogel found a mention of it in the May 23, 1924 issue of Southwest Builder & Contractor where it was noted that the theatre and two storefronts were being built for J.A. Piuma at a cost of $35,000.  It got in the 1926 city directory. The location was was two blocks east of the 110, south of Slauson Ave and north of Gage Ave. The area is due west o Huntington Park.  In the 30s it was advertised as the New Princess.

Seats: 800 originally   Architect: Laurence McConville

Status: Closing date is unknown. It was still running as late as 1949. The theatre has been demolished -- the site is now a parking lot.

More information:  See the Cinema Treasures page for the Princess Theatre for some fine research.

    Noirish Los Angeles   



Thanks to Mr. Ethereal Reality for this 1944 shot of the
Princess, evidently a find on eBay. It's on his post #30777.
 full size view | on Noirish LA

The photo later made an appearance on Cinema Treasures.

Rimpau Theatre

4720 W. Washington Blvd.

Los Angeles, CA 90016   | map |

Opened: Presumably 1923 -- it's not in the 1922 or 23 city directories. In a 1923 Paramount ad it's listed as the Rimpau Theatre, Washington & Rimpau. The location is 5 blocks east of La Brea Ave. It was still the Rimpau in the 1929 directory. Sometime in 1932 or earlier it was renamed the Metro Theatre. It's listed that way in the 1932 and later city directories.

In 1950 Nick and Edna Stewart formed a group called Ebony Showcase that initially performed in a converted garage. After using several other venues they took over the Metro in 1965 and renamed it the Ebony Showcase, the first African-American owned legit theatre in Los Angeles. The mission was to allow black actors to perform in roles outside the usual media stereotypes. Nick had previously done comic roles on "Amos 'n Andy."  The couple's daughter Valarie still maintains a website: www.ebonyshowcase.org.

Seats: 750    Architects: Unknown

Status:  In 1998 the theatre, along with adjoining parcels, was seized via eminent domain by the Los Angeles Community Redevelopment Agency. While initially promising to spare the theatre, the CRA demolished it one day without notice. A new brutalist building, the Holden Performing Arts Center is now on the site. The tenant is Ebony Repertory Theatre.

More information:  See the Cinema Treasures page on the theatre, which they list as the Metro Theatre.

    American Classic Images    

A 1983 look at the theatre from
the American Classics collection.

    L.A. Public Library Collection   

www.lapl.org



Nick and Edna Stewart outside the theatre. It's a
1981 Paul Chinn photo for the Herald Examiner.
full size view


A cropped version of the photo appears on
Cinema Treasures and on Photos of Los Angeles.

Rio Theatre

11239 S. Western Ave.  | map

Los Angeles, CA 90047

Opened: 1948 as a project of the Fanchon & Marco Southside Theatres chain.The location was on the west side of Western just north of Imperial Highway.

A year later F&M built the Southside Theatre, a larger house at Vermont & Imperial. 

Seats:  About 1,100.         Architect: Clarence J. Smale

Closing:
Statewide Theatres was the last circuit to run the Rio. By 1968 it was running as an independent. It closed in 1971 after gang activity made business difficult.

Status: It's been demolished. Joe Vogel on Cinema Treasures notes that it was still visible on aerial photos as late as 1994 or 1995. There's a parking lot and a fried chicken place on the site now.

More Information: See the Cinema Treasures page on the Rio for all that is known about this one.

     Cinema Treasures    

cinematreasures.org/theater/5046/


A 1949 view of the Rio on Cinema Treasures,
a contribution from Dallas Movie Theaters.
Thanks to Ken McIntyre for
this shot of the abandoned Rio.

Ritz Theatre

226 S. Market St.

| map |

Inglewood, CA 90301

Opened:  1937 as an independently operated theatre.  The address is listed as 220 S. Market in the 1938 and 1940 directories, at 226 in 1942. 

Ken Mcintyre notes that in the early 60s the Ritz was operated by Allied Theatres of California. The circuit also had the Nubel in Bellflower, the Compton, the Vogue in South Gate, the Boulevard in East L.A., the Arden in Lynwood and the Ritz in Ontario.

In the late 60s it was under Loew's management and after a remodel emerged as the Cine. It later ran as an independent first and second run house and eventually succumbed to the lure of porno as the demographics of the area changed. In the 70s it became a Pussycat Theatre.

After its film days were over, the building was used as a church. It went up for sale in 2007.  The photo is a 2012 Google Maps view. Click on it to enlarge or head to the interactive version.

Architect:  Unknown          Seating: 708

Status: Sitting vacant. It was initially offered for sale at $749,000 in 2007. The price later dropped. The Loopnet listing (calling it the Miracle Theater) reported in mid-2014 that it was off the market.

More Information: See the Cinema Treasures page on the Ritz, where there's a fun history by George Haider and research by Ken McIntyre.  Cinema Tour also has a page on the Ritz with a Ken Roe facade photo.

    American Classic Images    



A 1984 shot of the theatre, when it
 was called the Pussycat.
full size view | on the AC site




A narrower version of the shot above, but without
the watermark appears with Jay Allen Sanford's
Pussycat Theatre History epic on blogspot.

    Calisphere   

www.calisphere.universityofcalifornia.edu


A 1972 look south on Market at the Ritz when it was Loew's
Cine. The photo comes from the Inglewood Public Library
 full size view | on Calisphere

    Huntington Digital Library   

hdl.huntington.org/cdm/landingpage/collection/p16003coll2


A lovely panorama looking north on Market St. in November 1952.
 On the right is the Ritz with the United Artists beyond. On the left
is the Fox Inglewood. The image is a detail from part of a much
 larger photo by Joseph Fadler taken for Southern California Edison.
Thanks to Noirish Los Angeles contributor BifRayRock
 for the find. He has it on his Noirish post #37847.

    L.A. Public Library Collection   

www.lapl.org


A c.1938 view of the Ritz by Herman Schultheis.
full size view

Riviera Theatre

5002 W. Adams Blvd.
 

Los Angeles, CA 90016
| map

Opened: 1925 as the Riviera. The independent house was initially operated by Miguel Montijo. The family lost the property in the early 30s. The location is at Adams and Longwood Ave., a block east of La Brea Ave.

The photo of the Riviera Theatre building is a 2015 Google Maps view. Click on it to enlarge or head to Google for the interactive version. We're sort of looking east -- that's Longwood taking off south just beyond the building.  At some point the house was renamed the Fremont Theatre -- it was running under that name in the mid-40s.

Seating: 801

Status: Closing date is unknown. Joe Vogel on Cinema treasures says it seems to have vanished from listings by 1950. It's still there but remodeled. It's now warehouse space using an address of 5000 W. Adams.

More Information:  See the Cinema Treasures page on the Riviera. Thanks to Joe Vogel for the fine research on this one.  Ken McIntyre has a 1945 L.A. Times directory ad in one of his Photobucket albums that lists the theatre as the Fremont, at Adams and La Brea.

Rosebud Theatre

1940 S. Central Ave. 

Los Angeles, CA 90011  | map

Opened: It's in city directories starting in 1915. The location is about a block south of Washington Blvd.,  three blocks south of the I-10.

Seating: 800

Status: It's been demolished. The Rosebud evidently closed sometime prior to 1956. Joe Vogel reports on Cinema Treasures that it's not in the 1956 city directory.

More Information:  See the Cinema Treasures page on the Rosebud. They have a 1938 ad for the theatre in their photo section.

    L.A. Public Library Collection   

www.lapl.org



A 1945 photo the with Rosebud running "Song of
 the Islands" starring Betty Grable, and "My Friend
Flicka" with Preston Foster. It's from the Library's
 "Shades of L.A." collection.
full size view




The Rosebud's employees in the lobby in 1941.
 full size view


     Photos of Los Angeles    

www.facebook.com/groups/244565982234863/


A 1950 ad for four theatres on S. Central. In addition to the
 Rosebud, we have the Bill Robinson, the Florence Mills
and the Savoy. Thanks to Ken McIntyre for the find.
full size view | on Photos of LA

Savoy Theatre

5326 S. Central Ave.

Los Angeles, CA 91702  | map

Opened: 1913. The Savoy is in the 1914 city directory with a 5026 address, perhaps a typo.  It's in a 1914 ad with "Gore & Anderson, proprietors" at 54th & Central. In 1915 and later directories it's at 5326. Oscar Anderson gets a listing for himself at this address in 1922.

Anderson may have had an earlier theatre in the neighborhood -- he gets a listing in the 1912 directory under Moving Picture Theatres for 5427 S. Central.

Seating: 700             

Architect: Edward J. Borgmeyer. Joe Vogel on Cinema Treasures made the find: "The November 9, 1912, issue of Southwest Contractor & Manufacturer has an item that is about the project that became the Savoy Theatre:

'THEATER AND STORES—E. J. Borgmeyer, 317 Stimson Bldg, has prepared plans for a l-story brick moving picture theater and store building to be built on the northeast corner of Fifty-fourth St. and Central Ave. for S. K. Lindley. Concrete foundation, 50x125 ft., cement floor, brick walls, stucco front, staff work, composition roof, plate and prism glass store fronts, marble and tile lobby, mahogany and pine trim, electric wiring. Bids have been taken.'"

Status:  Closing date is unknown -- it was still running in 1950. See the ad in the Rosebud Theatre listing just above.  The Savoy has been demolished. There's a 1987 vintage building now on the site.

More Information: See the Cinema Treasures page on the Savoy for fine research by Joe Vogel.

   Julius Shulman - Getty Research Institute  


A 1942 facade photo by Mr. Shulman.

An interior view from 1942. Looks like we had
a bit of updated deco work on the side wall.
full size view

These (and one more) are indexed as Shulman's
"Job Lee-T: Savoy Theatre, Terrace Theatre, 1942."
| the photos on the Getty site |

Perhaps the Lee in the title indicates S. Charles Lee was having the place scoped out for a remodel project. The Terrace business is a mystery as the exterior shot is obviously not of the Terrace Cinema in the City Terrace neighborhood. The theatre at 5326 S. Central is the only Savoy in the 1942 city directory. Perhaps the interior view above (and one more showing people onstage that's in the set) are of the Terrace -- but that theatre isn't thought to have opened until the late 40s.

Thanks to Noirish Los Angeles contributor Hoss C for finding the photos on the Getty site. He has them on his Noirish post #37256.

Shrine Auditorium

665 W. Jefferson Blvd.    | map |

Los Angeles, CA   90007

Opened: January 23, 1926 as a replacement for a 1906 Shrine Auditorium that had burned in 1920.  It was first known as the Los Angeles Civic Auditorium.

Architects:  John C. Austin and A.M. Edelman did the building. The auditorium interior is by G. Albert Lansburgh.  

Seating:   6,308 currently. The capacity was originally 6,717.

In addition to the auditorium, the complex includes various basement halls and a vast exposition hall to the north.

Status: Alive and well as a home for the circus, concerts, dance presentations, sports  and other special events.

More information:  See the page on the Shrine Auditorium.

Southside Theatre

11243 S. Vermont Ave.

Los Angeles, CA 90044

| map

Opened: 1949 by the Fanchon & Marco operated chain Southside Theatres. Looking somewhat like a quonset hut, the building has a roof made of laminated wood trusses.

Fanchon & Marco also had the Rio Theatre and the Baldwin. The location is at Vermont just north of Imperial Highway. The photo looking north on Vermont is a 2015 Google Maps view. Click on it to enlarge or head to Google for the interactive version.Thanks to Bill Gabel on Cinema Treasures for providing the text of a trade magazine article:

"...When the new 1466 seat Southside Theatre opened it was designed to cater to a middle class area with a seven day subsequent run of films. Therefore it was desired to accomplish a theatre that was imposing enough to command respect and efficient enough to operate economically. Designed around the use of a Lamella timber roof lined with asbestos limpet on gypsum board, this large theatre follows a construction principle that has become very popular on the West Coast. The bearing walls are buttressed concrete with brick masonry fillers. The lobby has a chartreuse ceiling with walls of chocolate brown and deep green. Carpeting is in a philodendron pattern carried out in beige and maroon, and all lighting is indirect.

Walls of the auditorium are blue green with large philodendron leaves and the ceiling is gold. The proscenium wall is draped from side to side with coral festoons and chartreuse hangings. The traveler curtain is yellow. Lighting is through indirect lighted central ceiling coves and side coves. The ladies lounge is particularly attractive with silver foil paper covered walls adorned with black and red butterflies.
An edge-lighted trap mural depicts a conventional, motion picture themes.The Southside Theatre had 6 stores built on the Vermont Ave. frontage."

Seats: 1,466, all on a single level.            Architect: Clarence J. Smale

Status: It's now a church.  Closing date is unknown. It was running as a theatre as late as1970.

More Information:  See the Cinema Treasures page on the Southside Theatre. Cinema Tour has a 2003 exterior photo on their page.

     Cinema Treasures    



A look at the entrance from the Bill Gabel collection.
full size view | on Cinema Treasures



An interior photo from the Bill Gabel Collection.

    L.A. Public Library Collection   

www.lapl.org


A 1949 pre-opening look at the building.
full size view

Also see:
| 1949 looking north - "My Friend Irma" |

    Roadside Architecture   

Debra Jane's L.A. Theatres page 3 includes
this c.2008 look at the Southside's vertical.
full size view | on the Road Arch site.

Sunbeam Theatre

6525 Compton Ave.  | map

Los Angeles, CA 90001

Opened: It was running in 1920, but the opening date is unknown. It had an explosion in 1923 but was rebuilt. The location, in the Florence area, is on the west side of Compton Ave. at 66th St, 3 blocks south of Gage Ave. The 1929 city directory has an address of 6521 for the theatre. 

Seats:  1,200    Architect:  Unknown

Closing: The wooden structure burned in 1931.  Both the 1923 problems and the 1931 fire may have been the result of labor issues. Franklin Theatres Corporation was the operator at the time of its demise.  The Gentry Theatre was erected on the site in 1937.

More Information:  See the Cinema Treasures page on the Sunbeam for an account of the 1931 fire.  The Cinema Tour page recounts a 1920 news story about the theatre being fined $200 for discrimination.

Symphony Theatre

212 N. Tamarind Ave.  | map

Compton, CA 90220

Opened: May 12, 1924 as a combination film and vaudeville house. 

Seats: 860            Architects: Richard D. King and Frank M. Goodwin

Closing: The 1933 Long Beach earthquake hit Compton hard. It was the end for the Symphony Theatre.  The location is now in the middle of a shopping center.

More Information:  See our page on the Symphony Theatre.

    Cal State Dominguez Hills   

digitalcollections.archives.csudh.edu/cdm/


A view of the Moorish-inspired exterior of
the theatre from a 20s collage showing various
downtown Compton business buildings.
larger detail view | collage on the UCDH site

Tower Theatre

111 N. Long Beach Blvd.
 

Compton, CA 90221  | map

Opened:  1935. The location is just north of E. Compton Blvd. Operated by Fox West Coast, it was also known as the Fox Tower Theatre.

Architect: S. Charles Lee

Seating: 1,000

Status:  The theatre was running into the mid-60s when Compton was still a safe place to go to the movies. After that it turned into a war zone and all the theatres closed. The owner has constructed a series of stores along the front of the property -- the auditorium is still there but unused. The photo is a September 2014 Google Maps view. Click on it to enlarge -- or head to Google for the current interactive version.

More Information:  See the Cinema Treasures page on the Fox Compton with, among other things, links to recent exterior photos of the building by Ken McIntyre. Ken also has a 2011 exterior view on the Facebook page Photos of Los Angeles. Cinema Tour also has a page, with one lounge area photo.

    UCLA S. Charles Lee Papers   

calisphere.org | digital2.library.ucla.edu


A 1935 look at the new theatre's facade.
A 1935 night photo of the Tower running
 "Woman Wanted" and "The 39 Steps."

The two photos above also appear on page 67 and
68 of Maggie Valentine's book about S. Charles Lee,
 "The Show Starts on the Sidewalk."



An entrance detail
A look at the screen end of the auditorium.

Also in the collection:
| rear of the auditorium | a lobby view | another look into the lounge area |

Trojan Theatre

931 W. Jefferson Blvd. 

Los Angeles, CA 90007  | map

Opened: 1913 as the University Theatre, operated by J.O. Canfield and C.J. Wagner. The theatre got a story in the November 22, 1913 Moving Picture World:

"The Inhabitants of the Southern part of California, especially the part near Los Angeles, are particularly proud of the University Theater, located at 931 West Jefferson Street, that city, for the simple reason that it is a moving picture theater of the first order, according to data furnished by the managers, Messrs. J.O. Canfield and C. J. Wagner.  A feature of the house is its large mirror screen installed in the latter part of last April at an expense of $1,000. The measurements of the screen are 12 feet by 16 feet, and the managers claim that is a result of the large increase in patronage...

The University is the only theater in the Southern part of California to exploit a mirror screen, and the managers deserve credit for being the first in that part of the state to recognize the efficiency of this projection surface. Another device that helps to give better projection at the University is the Mercury Arc Rectifier. The operating room, which is large, is built entirely of fire-proof material. In addition to the Mercury Arc Rectifier the projection battery consists of an Edison Model B and a Motiograph machine. On one side of the projection chamber there has been allotted space for a little workshop where all tools and appurtenances pertaining to such a room are carefully laid way and within easy access in case of emergency.    
The auditorium, which is 48 feet by 104 feet in measurement, has a seating capacity of 600 persons. There is a stage 6 feet by 20 feet, with a singers booth on each side. There is a five foot aisle on each side of the auditorium and a wide one running across the  center. The exits are large and conveniently arranged. Fresh air constantly permeates the auditorium for the ventilating system is perfect. Entertainments are given only in the evenings with the exception of the first Saturday of each month when the managers put on a free show for the children in the vicinity. The University is the only house in Southern California to employ uniformed ushers. Moving pictures and songs constitute each entertainment." 

Thanks to Joe Vogel on Cinema Treasures for spotting the story. It's on Google Books. Cezar Del Valle's Theatre Talks blog has the article as the subject of a 2012 post.

the theatre is in the 1913 city directory as the University, in the 1914 directory as "Canfield & Wagner." In the 1915, 19, 19, 21 & 1929 directories it's listed as the University. In the 1922 and 1923 city directories it's listed as the Realart Theatre. A 1923 Paramount ad also lists it as the Realart. By 1941 it had become the Trojan Theatre.

Seating: 600 initially, later down to 453.

Status:  Closed in December 1952. At the time it was run by Bess Midnick, who also had the La Tosca Theatre. The building was later leased out to various commercial tenants and then demolished. For a time there was a strip mall on the site and now it's getting redeveloped again as part of the USC University Village project. The location is about 2 1/2 blocks west of the Shrine Auditorium.

More Information: See the Cinema Treasures page on the Trojan for all that is known about the theatre.

    Motion Picture World   


A look at the new University Theatre from the
March 22, 1913 issue of Moving Picture World.

Union Theatre

1122 24th St.    | map

Los Angeles, CA   90007

Opened: This West Adams/USC area theatre opened around 1915 as the Fairyland Theatre. It's also been the Union Square Theatre, Mystic Theatre, the Louise Glaum Playhouse, the Continental Theatre and lastly, the Union Theatre.

It reopened in June 2005 as a Panorama -- the Velaslavasay Panorama. The founder is Los Angeles artist Sara Velas. The balcony area is devoted to the panorama itself, accessed by a spiral staircase in what would have been the middle of the auditorium. The photo is a 2012 view by Bill Counter -- click on it to enlarge.

Seating: 400 originally. In 1935 it was listed as having 385.  Currently only about 10 rows remain at the front of the original theatre space.

More Information: See our page on the Union Theatre / Velaslavasay Panorama.

United Artists

148 N. Market St.
   | map

Inglewood, CA 90301

Opened:  1931.  As with the other United Artists theatres in the Los Angeles area, it was actually operated by Fox West Coast. In the 70s it was leased out to Mitchell Bros. as a porno venue. In the 80s it was run in conjunction with the Fox Inglewood across the street as the Fox Cinema II.

Architects:  Clifford A. Balch, P.A. Eisen and A.R. Walker. It was similar to other early 30s UA houses.

Seating: 942

Status: Destroyed by fire in the 90s.  The 1955 photo is a detail from a larger view by Alan Weeks. Click on it for the full scene. Thanks to Sean Ault for the find.

More Information: See our page on the United Artists Inglewood.

Variety Theatre

5253 W. Adams Blvd.
 

Los Angeles, CA 90016 
| map
|

Opened: 1934. The location is 5 1/2 blocks west of La Brea Ave. on the north side of the street. The photo is a 2016 Google Maps view. Click on it to enlarge or head to Google for the interactive version.

Seating: 662 at one time.

The Variety Theatre in the Movies:  The Variety's exterior is seen as the theatre where Mia (Emma Stone) stages her one-woman play in Damien Chazelle's "La La Land" (Lionsgate, 2016). Interiors were shot elsewhere. See our Theatres In Movies post about "La La Land"  for more on other theatres seen in the film.

Status: It's now a nightclub space with no fixed seating. The complex, Cafe Club Fais Do-Do, includes the theatre as well as a cafe/club on the corner in a building that used to be a bank. Their website says "Fais Do-Do is a gumbo of eclectic music and diverse people coming together to build a stronger community by offering exposure to new cultures, sounds, and philosophies."

More Information:  See the Cinema Treasures page on the Variety.

   Club Fais Do-Do   

www.faisdodo.com



An classy undated look toward the Variety's

proscenium from the club's website.

full size view



Another proscenium photo.

full size view



A backwall view -- note the projection ports.
See the Fais Do-Do website's gallery page for more views.

Vogue Theatre

9325 Long Beach Blvd.  | map 

South Gate, CA 90280 

Opened: 1937. By the 60s it had become Teatro Los Pinos, a Spanish language house with films and occasional live shows. Later the focus was entirely on music and comedy shows for a Latino audience.

Architect: S. Charles Lee         Seating: 800

Status: Closed in 2014 and still available for lease.

More information: See our page on the Vogue Theatre.

    Huntington Digital Library   

hdl.huntington.org/cdm/landingpage/collection/p16003coll2



A 1938 shot by G. Haven Bishop taken
for Southern California Edison.

full size view


Warner Bros. Huntington Park

6714 Pacific Blvd.  | map 

Huntington Park, CA 90255 

Opened: November 19, 1930

Architect: B. Marcus Priteca 

Seating: 1,468

After Warner Bros. divested, the theatre was operated by Stanley Warner Corp. and (from 1968 on) Pacific Theatres. It has been known as the Huntington Park, the Huntington and Warners.

It was twinned in the 80's by Pacific Theatres and called Pacific's Warner 2

Status: It's getting turned into retail space.

More Information: See our Warner Huntington Park page for lots more.

Western Theatre

3930 S. Western Ave. 

Los Angeles, CA 90062  | map

Opened:  Perhaps late 1926 or early 1927. Joe Vogel on Cinema treasures reports that it's in the 1927 city directory but not earlier. The location is on the east side of Western halfway between Exposition Blvd. and Martin Luther King Blvd.  When operated by Fox West Coast, it was known as the Fox Western.

Seating: 904      

Status: It's been demolished. The site is now part of the MLK Therapeutic Recreation Center.

More Information:  See the Cinema Treasures page on the Western.

    Sean Ault Collection   


A 60s look south on Western toward the closed
 Western Theatre -- it's down there beyond the motel. 
full size view


A detail from the photo above.

Thanks to Sean Ault for sending us this one. This photo, the
only one of the Western to surface so far, has been kicking around in
several versions. Tina Asher posted one on Photos of Los Angeles.
Bill Gabel has another on Cinema Treasures.