Rivoli / Capri Theatre


6258 Van Nuys Blvd. (@ Erwin)    | map

Van Nuys (Los Angeles), CA 91401


Opened: 1921. In the 1921 city directory there's a listing for it as the Van Nuys Theatre at Sherman Way near Erwin. In the 1922, 1923 & 1924 city directories it's listed as the Rivoli Theatre at 260 Sherman Way, Van Nuys.

That chunk of Sherman later got renamed Van Nuys Blvd. The address is listed as 6262 Van Nuys Blvd. in the 1926 city directory, 6260 in 1928, 6258 in the 1939/40 directory with it being called the Fox Rivoli.

Architect: The original architect is unknown. Cinema Treasures researcher Joe Vogel notes that plans for the theatre were announced in the March 18, 1921, issue of Southwest Builder & Contractor. Clifford Balch did a remodel in 1941 that included facade and restroom work. By 1959 or 1960 the building got another remodel and emerged as the Capri Theatre.

Seating: 700

Status: It closed in the early 70s and was demolished for a Federal Building parking lot. The theatre's former location is now part of the site of the Van Nuys / City of LA Braude "Constituent Service Center." The theatre was just north of Erwin which now dead ends at Van Nuys Blvd. What had been Erwin east of Van Nuys Blvd. is a pedestrian walkway between the City of LA building and the Federal Building to the south.

More Information: See the Cinema Treasures page on this one, which they list as the Capri. Joe Vogel has, as usual, contributed some fine research.


    Sean Ault Archives by Osiris Press    



A 1952 look north on Van Nuys Blvd. from Sean's
wonderful collection. The Rivoli is on the right.
 full size view



    Cinema Treasures    

cinematreasures.org/theaters/2163


The Rivoli is over on the right in this 50s
 Christmas scene on Van Nuys Blvd.
 Thanks to Senorsock for the post.
full size view | on Cinema Treasures



A 1976 or 1977 view of the abandoned
Capri Theatre taken by Gary Rabbit, a
contributor to Cinema Treasures.
full size view | on Cinema Treasures

The photo above also appears
on Photos of Los Angeles.



The demolition fence up -- it's
another shot by Gary Rabbit.
Thanks to Bill Gabel for this shot looking south
on Van Nuys Blvd. toward the Rivoli.

    Theatres in Los Angeles    

by Suzanne Tarbell Cooper,
Amy Ronnebeck Hall and Marc Wanamaker.
Arcadia Publishing, 2008.
www.arcadiapublishing.com | google books preview


A 1945 photo of the Rivoli's facade from Bison Archives.
  It's on page 104 of "Theatres in Los Angeles."







Cruise night at the Rivoli -- by this time renamed the Capri.

photo: Jon Haimowitz collection - c.1972

Thanks, Jon! The photo appeared as a post
on the Mid Century Modern Facebook page.



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    B'hend and Kaufmann Collection   

digitalcollections.oscars.org/cdm


A 50s look at the Fox Rivoli snackbar.  It looks like
we're promoting a western. The photo is by Nate Singer.
full size view | on the AMPAS site


The Tom B'hend and Preston Kaufmann Collection is
part of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences
Margaret Herrick Library Digital Collection.


    Los Angeles Public Library    

www.lapl.org


Looking north on Van Nuys Blvd. in
the 40s. The Rivoli is on the right.
full size view


George Mann of the dance team of Barto and Mann took
 this photo of the Rivoli in 1926. His son Brad Smith has it
on Flickr as part of a terrific portfolio of theatre photos.

For many more wonderfully evocative views of a vanished
 theatrical culture, see the George Mann Archive.



    San Fernando Valley Relics    

www.facebook.com/valleyrelics


A c.1959 shot of the theatre, here renamed the
 Capri, running "Black Orpheus." It was added
to the Relics page by Phillip DePauk.

  The view above also appears
on Photos of los Angeles