For more information visit: 

Center for Applied Linguistics

National Network for Early Language Learning

American Council for Immersion Education

CARLA (Center for Advanced Research on Language Acquisition)



Language Acquisition Research

  • What do you know about your infant’s brain development? Take this brain quiz from the organization Zero to Three and find out.

  • Petitto observes two groups of bilingual infants: Langue des Signes Quebecoise/French and French/English over a year and concludes that infants are able to distinguish between the two languages long before they are able to produce in either language. This article addresses many parents’ concerns that early bilingualism will cause delays in language production or otherwise interrupt language development. Petitto, L. A., Katerelos, M., Levy, B., Gauna, K., Tétrault, K., & Ferraro, V. (2001). Bilingual signed and spoken language acquisition from birth: Implications for mechanisms underlying bilingual language acquisition.Journal of Child Language, 28 (2), pages 1-44. Reprinted with the permission of Cambridge University Press.

  • New Lessons in How Brain Acquires Language Offered at Seminar
    Notes from a Symposium at the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communicative Disorders. This article summarizes research from Dr. Patricia Kuhl, the William P. and Ruth Gerberding professor at the University of Washington and co-director of the university's Center for Mind, Brain, and Learning; Helen J. Neville, professor of psychology and neuroscience and director of the University of Oregon's Brain Development Lab and Center for Cognitive Neuroscience; Neville, professor of psychology and neuroscience and director of the University of Oregon's Brain Development Lab and Center for Cognitive Neuroscience; Dr. Laura-Ann Pettito professor and director of Dartmouth's Cognitive Neuroscience Laboratory for Language and Child Development.

  • This website is a comprehensive bibliography of books and articles by Stephen D. Krashen about language acquisition, language learning, reading, bilingual education, ELL and foreign language education. A highly acclaimed and controversial linguist, Krashen is credited with the theory of Input+1- the idea that students benefit most from language input that slightly surpasses their output abilities.