CSPL

  • Communications & Signal Processing Lab (CSPL) is directed by Prof. Kyoung-Jae Lee in the Dept. of Electronics and Control Engineering at Hanbat National University.
  • We focus on developing the key technologies for next generation wireless communications by applying communication theory, information theory, and signal processing.

Opening

  • [ M.S./Ph.D. Students ] CSPL is currently recruiting M.S./Ph.D. students. Please send your CV and academic transcripts to Prof. Lee (kyoungjae@hanbat.ac.kr) if you are interested.
  • [ Postdoc Fellow ] CSPL is currently recruiting Postdoc applicants for the NRF postdoctoral fellowship program (See the pdf file ). If you want to work in CSPL, please send your CV to Prof. Lee (kyoungjae@hanbat.ac.kr).

News
  • Dec. 2014, New research project, funded by Korea Electric Power Corporation (KEPCO).
    • CSPL carries out the research project supported by the KEPCO for a study on "Multiple-input multiple-output power line communications based on two-way relaying transmission".
  • Dec. 2014, New research project, funded by National Research Foundation (NRF).
    • CSPL receives the research fund from the Korean government during 3 years for "Cooperative research on appropriate technology for low-power wireless networks based on solar-energy for constructing communication infrastructures in Africa".
  • Dec. 2013, Prof. Lee won IEEE ComSoc APB Outstanding Young Researcher Award and IEEE ComSoc APB Outstanding Paper Award.
    • These two awards honor outstanding young researchers and journal papers in IEEE Communications Society Asia-Pacific region over the last 3 years, respectively. The award ceremony was held at IEEE GLOBECOM, Atlanta, USA in December 2013.
    • Media reports: [1] [2] [3]
  • Oct. 2013, New research project, funded by National Research Foundation (NRF).
    • CSPL is supported with the research fund from the Korean government during 3 years for a study on "Transmission techniques for optimizing spectral efficiency and energy efficiency in relay-based small cells".