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  LESSON PLAN FORMAT (Instructional Design Web Page)

1. Who Really Won the War of 1812? (U. S. History lesson plan for grades 6 – 8)                         

2. Overview

Using primary sources from both an American perspective and British perspective students will decide for themselves who really won the War of 1812.

3. Goal

At the end of this lesson, students will have a better understanding of the causes and effects of the War of 1812.

4. Objectives

Students will understand that the war had no clear winner. They should ascertain that neither side was a complete winner; neither side gained any territory.  The original causes of the war were no longer valid.

5.  Investigative Question (s) – Upon completion of the lesson, students will be able to answer this question(s):

Why did the United States declare war on Britain in 1812? 

Why did they think that they could win?  What did the U.S. hope to gain?  What did they actually gain?

What did the British hope to gain?  What did they actually gain?

6. Time Required 

Two, 44 minute class periods

7. Recommended Grade Range 

Grade range 6 - 8

8. Subject / Sub-Subject

Social Studies/History

9. Standards

Reading Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies 6–8

CC.6-8.R.H.2 Key Ideas and Details: Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate summary of the source distinct from prior knowledge or opinions.

CC.6-8.R.H.3 Key Ideas and Details: Identify key steps in a text’s description of a process related to history/social studies (e.g., how a bill becomes law, how interest rates are raised or lowered).

CC.6-8.R.H.4 Craft and Structure: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including vocabulary specific to domains related to history/social studies.

CC.6-8.R.H.5 Craft and Structure: Describe how a text presents information (e.g., sequentially, comparatively, causally).

CC.6-8.R.H.6 Craft and Structure: Identify aspects of a text that reveal an author’s point of view or purpose (e.g., loaded language, inclusion or avoidance of particular facts).

CC.6-8.R.H.7 Integration of Knowledge and Ideas: Integrate visual information (e.g., in charts, graphs, photographs, videos, or maps) with other information in print and digital texts.

CC.6-8.R.H.8 Integration of Knowledge and Ideas: Distinguish among fact, opinion, and reasoned judgment in a text.

CC.6-8.R.H.9 Integration of Knowledge and Ideas: Analyze the relationship between a primary and secondary source on the same topic.

CC.6-8.R.H.10 Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity: By the end of grade 8, read and comprehend history/social studies texts in the grades 6–8 text complexity band independently and proficiently.

 

2.  Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate summary of the source distinct from prior knowledge or opinions.

 

6.  Identify aspects of a text that reveal an author’s point of view or purpose (e.g., loaded language, inclusion or avoidance of particular facts).

 

8.  Distinguish among fact, opinion, and reasoned judgment in a text.

 

10. Credits

Kathy O’Dwyer

PREPARATION

11. Materials Used

Primary Source Picture set from Library of Congress

7th grade Social Studies Text Book (for background information)

12. Resources Used

Primary source Analysis tools from Library of Congress

Creating America: Beginnings through Reconstruction (textbook)

PROCEDURE

13. Description of Procedure

            1.  Assign reading Social Studies textbook pages as homework for background information prior to lesson.

2.  Set-up 6 stations around the room with primary source documents from the Library of Congress. (3 documents favor the British perspective and 3 the American)

3.  Remind students of how we analyze documents.  Divide students into 6 groups.  Explain that each group must have one student to complete each of the following jobs: writer, observer & reflector (x2?), questioner, & task master/helper (to keep the group on task).  Explain that the observer’s job is to tell their observations to the writer.  The questioner should think of questions that relate to the observations.  All members of the group may reflect, but the task master should keep the group focused on their task and help wherever necessary, while the writer records their observations, reflections and questions.

4.  Give each group 6 copies of the Primary Source Analysis Tool, one for each document.  Include 2 copies of the political cartoon analysis tool.  Instruct students to write the Title of each document on a page of the analysis tool as they begin their analysis of that document

5.  Instruct groups to move around the room from station to station, analyzing the source material at each station, and changing positions within the group.  (If the writer always has to do the writing, this may seem unfair and tedious.)  Students will have 36 minutes to complete all stations, 6 minutes per station.  (Connect, Wonder, Reflect)

End of Day one.  Collect and store materials.

DAY 2:

1.       Instruct students to return to their groups, and redistribute student materials: source analysis tools to proper groups.

2.       Instruct students to review their observations, reflections, and questions for each document. (3 min.)  (Reflect)

3.        Show primary source documents to class as a whole (see power point the bottom of the page).  Ask groups to share their questions for each document.  (The writer from each group for each document should read the groups’ observations, reflections and questions)  Invite other groups to comment and share their observations and reflections. (24 min.)n  (Express, Reflect, )

4.       Invite students to decide as individuals who they think won the war based on their observations, reflections, and questions.  Students who believe that the British won should stand on one side of the room.  Students who believe that America won should stand on the other side of the room.  Those who can’t decide or believe that neither side won, stand in the middle of the room.  At this point, I hope that students will begin to debate their decisions, perhaps changing their positions.  (Express, Construct, Investigate)

5.       CLOSURE: Exit ticket.  On notebook paper, explain your choice in 1 or 2 sentences.  Cite the source(s) that influenced your decision (which documents?).  (Express)

13a.  The Inquiry Cycle:

Connect – What do you see?  Do you see any words?  Do you see anything that might be a symbol?  Do you see people in this document? What are they doing? What event is this document related to?

Wonder What do you wonder about?  Who?  What?  When?  Where?  Why?  How?

InvestigateWhat people and objects are shown?  How are they arranged?  Is there any relationship between them?

ConstructWho do you think was the intended audience for this document? 

ExpressDo you think that the artist is trying to persuade the audience?  How?

Reflect Based on your analysis, what conclusions can you draw about the War of 1812?

13b. Management of Students

Students will work in cooperative groups, whole class, and independently.

EVALUATION

14. Evaluation

Formative:

 Grade primary source tool

Summative:

 Analyze exit tickets

15.  Extensions:

Investigate the Treaty of Ghent: terms and conditions.

Students color maps illustrating territory held by British and Americans before and after the war.

Investigate the writing of the National Anthem and the meaning of the words.

Investigate the role of Native Americans in the War of 1812. 

 
 
Ċ
Kathy O'Dwyer,
Nov 25, 2012, 7:00 AM
Ċ
Kathy O'Dwyer,
Nov 25, 2012, 7:00 AM
Ċ
Kathy O'Dwyer,
Nov 25, 2012, 6:51 AM
ć
Kathy O'Dwyer,
Nov 17, 2012, 1:04 PM