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Pearl Harbor

Our Catalog Document #0051 (order now) Contains a souvenir letter written by the Commander of the Pacific Fleet the day of the attack and the postmarked envelope.

High School

The Date That Lives in Infamy: Pearl Harbor Lesson Plans http://www.history.navy.mil/branches/teach/pearl/opening.htm Beginning with the first American treaty with Japan in 1854 though the attacks in 1941, students will use primary sources to synthesize information and draw conclusions about the role of the U.S. Navy in foreign policy and to understand how people in 1941 reacted to the tragic bombing of Pearl Harbor. (History)

Pearl Harbor http://school.discoveryeducation.com/lessonplans/programs/pearlharbor/ Students Will: research the events that took place at Pearl Harbor; write an in-depth article as though they experienced those events firsthand; and discuss what lessons can be learned from Pearl Harbor. (History)

Was the United States Ready for Pearl Harbor? http://www.nationalgeographic.com/xpeditions/lessons/13/g912/ready.html Students will conduct Internet research on Pearl Harbor, and answer some questions about the United States' level of preparedness for the attack; and imagine that they can go back in time, and write letters explaining to American military commanders at Pearl Harbor what they can do to prepare for a Japanese attack. (Geography, U.S. History, World History)

The Road to Pearl Harbor: The United States and East Asia, 1915-1941 http://edsitement.neh.gov/view_lesson_plan.asp?id=748 (History)

Middle School

Pearl Harbor: This is not a drill: http://www.history.navy.mil/branches/teach/pearl/real/realthing.htm In this activity the students will reconstruct the attack on Pearl Harbor and understand why the Japanese attacked the United States.

The Date That Lives in Infamy: Pearl Harbor Lesson Plans http://www.history.navy.mil/branches/teach/pearl/opening.htm Beginning with the first American treaty with Japan in 1854 though the attacks in 1941, students will use primary sources to synthesize information and draw conclusions about the role of the U.S. Navy in foreign policy and to understand how people in 1941 reacted to the tragic bombing of Pearl Harbor. (History)

Pearl Harbor http://school.discoveryeducation.com/lessonplans/programs/pearlharbor/ Students Will: research the events that took place at Pearl Harbor; write an in-depth article as though they experienced those events firsthand; and discuss what lessons can be learned from Pearl Harbor. (History)

Elementary

The Legacy of Pearl Harbor http://www.nationalgeographic.com/xpeditions/lessons/13/g35/legacy.html This lesson introduces students to the Japanese attack on Pearl Harborand asks them to consider the reasons why Japan might have wanted to expand its territory in the early 1940s. (Geography, U.S. History, World History)

Pearl Harbor http://www.instructorweb.com/lesson/pearlharbor.asp A history reading comprehension lesson on Pearl Harbor. The lesson contains information on the attack, the amount of destruction, and the effects of the attack on the United States. Includes a printable teaching lesson worksheet. (History)

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